New Guy to site and aquariums
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » New Guy to site and aquariums

New Guy to site and aquariums

This is a discussion on New Guy to site and aquariums within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Hello all, Myself and daughter just started the aquarium about 2 months ago. Had no idea what we were doing so took the advise ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Sailfin Molly
Sailfin Molly
Lemon Tetra
Lemon Tetra
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
New Guy to site and aquariums
Old 04-26-2011, 08:46 PM   #1
 
New Guy to site and aquariums

Hello all,

Myself and daughter just started the aquarium about 2 months ago. Had no idea what we were doing so took the advise of Petsmart employee. We have a 10gal freshwater tank. Started with 3 zebra danios and all three died within 2 weeks. Replaced them with more zebras all but one died. Replaced them with 2 more (which makes three) and still alive. Was told we could add more fish so we did, 2 cory catfish. All fish seem to being doing well, except I noticed today that one zebra has a bloated belly. What's up with this?

Ammonia is reading 2.0ppm
Nitrites 0ppm
Nitrates 0ppm
pH 7.6
Temp. 72-74 degrees F
Feeding flakes

Did a water change today (1gallon) of distilled water.
Am I on the right track or not. Please help.

Thanks,
Ashey
Ashey20002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2011, 03:56 PM   #2
 
kane chisholme's Avatar
 
I think danios need a ph Of 6.5-7 so yours is a bit high. There are ways to take it down though
kane chisholme is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to kane chisholme For This Useful Post:
Ashey20002 (04-28-2011)
Old 04-27-2011, 07:06 PM   #3
Rip
 
Rip's Avatar
 
danios don't need a specific ph. they are the hardiest of the hardy. but it sounds like you didn't let your tank cycle properly, and possibly didn't do proper water changes while it was cycling, and allowed the levels to remain at lethal levels for far too long. even now, i wonder if your tank is cycled, with Ammonia levels of 2.0, which is too high, and zero reading for nitrite and nitrate.
Rip is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rip For This Useful Post:
Ashey20002 (04-28-2011)
Old 04-27-2011, 08:14 PM   #4
 
Thoth's Avatar
 
^ yeah, with a cycled tank, you usually only see nitrate levels unless you have nitrites or ammonia in the newly added (tap)water.
Thoth is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Thoth For This Useful Post:
Ashey20002 (04-28-2011)
Old 04-27-2011, 08:52 PM   #5
 
Romad's Avatar
 
Hi Ashey,

Welcome to TFK and the fishkeeping hobby. Your tank is trying to cycle and the good news is that danios are pretty hardy fish and are often used in a "fish in" cycle. Your corys - not so much but stay on top of changing the water.

You really don't need distilled water. Your tap water will contain minerals needed but you'll have to condition the water before adding it to the tank. A really good one is Seachem Prime.

And which kit are you using to test the water?

Here's a helpful link on how to cycle your tank. We've all been there and done that and we're here to help so ask whatever you need to.

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...m-cycle-38617/
Romad is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Romad For This Useful Post:
Ashey20002 (04-28-2011)
Old 04-27-2011, 10:24 PM   #6
 
iamtetsuo's Avatar
 
Main problem here is you shouldn't be using distilled water. Fish need there to be some natural minerals in the water. Use spring water or preferably tap water with added water conditioner (I use Tetra AquaSafe, but there are plenty to choose from).

Is your tank planted? Adding live plants will help decrease the ammonia as the plants will absorb it directly. Java ferns are very easy going hardy plants, and don't even need to be buried in the gravel, simply attach them to a rock or piece of wood. At my local Petsmart they were also selling Anubis Nana already attached to a rock.

The water temperature is a little on the low side as well. Do you have a heater? If you don't that should be your second concern. Primary is getting the Ammonia levels down.
iamtetsuo is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to iamtetsuo For This Useful Post:
Ashey20002 (04-28-2011)
Old 04-27-2011, 11:14 PM   #7
 
jeaninel's Avatar
 
With ammonia at 2ppm you should do a bit larger water change...about 3-4 gallons is what I would do. And I agree about using tap water rather than distilled. Just be sure to use a conditioner to remove the chlorine and chloramines. Because your tank is still cycling be prepared to do frequent water changes (possibly daily) to keep ammonia and nitrite levels down. Once your tank is fully cycled and you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and some reading for nitrates weekly water changes are all that will be needed.
jeaninel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 04:48 PM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtetsuo View Post
Main problem here is you shouldn't be using distilled water. Fish need there to be some natural minerals in the water. Use spring water or preferably tap water with added water conditioner (I use Tetra AquaSafe, but there are plenty to choose from).

Is your tank planted? Adding live plants will help decrease the ammonia as the plants will absorb it directly. Java ferns are very easy going hardy plants, and don't even need to be buried in the gravel, simply attach them to a rock or piece of wood. At my local Petsmart they were also selling Anubis Nana already attached to a rock.

The water temperature is a little on the low side as well. Do you have a heater? If you don't that should be your second concern. Primary is getting the Ammonia levels down.

Thanks for the help. We have not added any more fish to the tank after the Pepper Cory Catfish. Don't want to be cruel to any more fish than we have too.

Last edited by Ashey20002; 04-28-2011 at 05:01 PM.. Reason: add more infor
Ashey20002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 08:21 PM   #9
 
Thanks for all the info.. I went and got a fern and seachem prime. Changed water (1 1/2 gallon). Hope everything is good.

Ashey
Ashey20002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2011, 12:04 AM   #10
 
iamtetsuo's Avatar
 
Well don't just hope! Be proactive about it

With a 10 gallon tank the more plants you add the better they'll be able to control the Ammonia levels. One plant isn't going to be able to handle a 10 gallon tank by itself, the more the merrier! Plus your fish will love it, creates lots of hiding places for them.

Make sure to check the ammonia levels often, once the ammonia stabilizes to 0 you can probably add a couple of more fish but not many.
iamtetsuo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advantages Of Acrylic Aquariums Versus Glass Aquariums dustinwilliams Member Submitted Articles 5 04-18-2011 11:03 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:28 PM.