New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up!
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up!

New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up!

This is a discussion on New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Note: Unfortunately, the 4-5 paragraph summary of my brief history with fish got deleted somehow, and so I will just stick to the facts ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Diamond Tetra
Diamond Tetra
Sailfin Molly
Sailfin Molly
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up!
Old 04-04-2009, 07:09 PM   #1
 
steveh's Avatar
 
New fish owner seeks advice on tank set up!

Note: Unfortunately, the 4-5 paragraph summary of my brief history with fish got deleted somehow, and so I will just stick to the facts this time around.

First, let me say Hi! I'm new to this forum, and to fish ownership in general. I started out like many, with not-so-great advice from Petco and a tank that was much too small for my two goldfish (a Black Moor and a Shubunkin), and ended up losing the Shubunkin. After much research and deliberation, I ended up getting the following today:

15 Gallon glass aquarium
Marineland Emperor 280 Bio-Wheel (rated at 50 gallons)
The original filter/pump from the 2.5 gallon "starter kit" from Petco
30 lbs of natural rock

A bottle of starter bacteria, and some sort of anti-ammonia/chlorine/nitrate/nitrite stuff

This along with the Black Moor and a new, larger Shubunkin, completes my current setup. The 2.5 gallon tank they were in was killing them with ammonia that I couldn't get rid of, and so I felt that it would likely be better for the fish to just get into the new aquarium as fast as I could, keeping in mind temperature differences and such.

So far, they seem to be happier, although the Black Moor is swimming quite quickly up the side of the aquarium on occasion. It seems to be happy, but I worry because that's what I do. The Shubunkin, who seemed to be doing poorly in the 2.5 gallon tank, swimming vertically in a corner as though trying to get to the top for air or something, is currently happily hiding behind a plant, with the occasional short outing due to prodding from the Black Moor.

All in all, does it sound like this setup could work? Assuming I get regular water testings at the great local fish store about 10 minutes from my house, "A World of Fish" in Minneapolis.

Thanks!
steveh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 07:40 PM   #2
 
Twistersmom's Avatar
 
Hello & welcome to the forum.
Congrats on the new awsome filter! One of the best filters they make!
I think the fish will be fine for a while, lots of water changes may be needed to keep the ammonia and nitrites under contol while the tank is cycling.
They may need more room as they grow, a 35 gal would give two full grown goldfish some room to move around. You could keep an eye out for a deal on a used tank from Craigslist. Sometimes you can find awsome deals.
Whats your plan for the small tank? It could make a nice home for a betta.
Good luck with the fish and new tank!
Twistersmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 09:07 PM   #3
 
steveh's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twistersmom View Post
Hello & welcome to the forum.
Congrats on the new awsome filter! One of the best filters they make!
I think the fish will be fine for a while, lots of water changes may be needed to keep the ammonia and nitrites under contol while the tank is cycling.
They may need more room as they grow, a 35 gal would give two full grown goldfish some room to move around. You could keep an eye out for a deal on a used tank from Craigslist. Sometimes you can find awsome deals.
Whats your plan for the small tank? It could make a nice home for a betta.
Good luck with the fish and new tank!
I trusted the helpful salesman at "A World of Fish," and judging by reviews, it sounds like my faith was well-placed! It looks almost sort of ridiculous on such a small tank, but I'd heard Goldfish needed extra filtration and so I hope this will help with their less-than-ideal tank size. I'd like to eventually move to something bigger, but this one fits really nicely onto a TV stand I already had in my room, and anything larger would've required an even bigger investment (I spent around $200 thus-far, which is likely over 10x less than some of the setups I've seen on here, but still a good chunk of change for a musician such as myself!)

I was thinking of cycling the little tank fishless, and either using it as a sick-tank, or potentially for something like a betta or some smaller, less dirty fishies. It really is quite a nice little tank!

Here's a picture for those interested in seeing what I've got!

Last edited by steveh; 04-04-2009 at 09:09 PM..
steveh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 09:40 PM   #4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveh View Post
A bottle of starter bacteria, and some sort of anti-ammonia/chlorine/nitrate/nitrite stuff

This along with the Black Moor and a new, larger Shubunkin, completes my current setup. The 2.5 gallon tank they were in was killing them with ammonia that I couldn't get rid of, and so I felt that it would likely be better for the fish to just get into the new aquarium as fast as I could, keeping in mind temperature differences and such.
Ummm, so the reason you couldn't get rid of the NH3 is because your tank wasn't cycled. Your new tank will have the same problems while you cycle this larger one. You won't be performing an efficient cycle if you do water changes during the cycle. Since you're using the fish you ACTUALLY want to keep to cycle you're tank, you can only hope they don't die from the NH3. If they die, remove the dead fish and I would suggest not doing a water change after removing the dead fish. I strongly recommend doing a fishless cycle with aqueous ammonia instead of using a fish you don't even want, and will probably get removed after the cycle, to cycle your tank.
plessans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 09:48 PM   #5
 
steveh's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by plessans View Post
Ummm, so the reason you couldn't get rid of the NH3 is because your tank wasn't cycled. Your new tank will have the same problems while you cycle this larger one. You won't be performing an efficient cycle if you do water changes during the cycle. Since you're using the fish you ACTUALLY want to keep to cycle you're tank, you can only hope they don't die from the NH3. If they die, remove the dead fish and I would suggest not doing a water change after removing the dead fish. I strongly recommend doing a fishless cycle with aqueous ammonia instead of using a fish you don't even want, and will probably get removed after the cycle, to cycle your tank.
Right, I know the first tank wasn't cycled, but I got the bigger tank with the significantly better filtering mechanism with the intention of smoothing out some of the chemical spikes that occur during said cycle. Because I had already purchased the fish, I figured it'd be at least a little more likely that they'd live through the cycle if they were in the bigger tank.

What would you recommend that I do, keeping in mind that the fish are already in the tank, and that I don't have a cycled tank to put them in while the new tank cycles?

I appreciate the advice, but you are coming off as a bit harsh, considering I'm new at this...
steveh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 11:38 PM   #6
 
Twistersmom's Avatar
 
I have cycled quite a few tanks with fish and no deaths occurred.
I know you already spent alot of money on your setup, (FISH KEEPING CAN GET EXPENSIVE) but if you can buy one more thing, I would recommend buying an API freshwater testing kit.
It will save you daily trips to the fish store for test.
It will not take long to start getting ammonia reading. When doing a fish cycle, I try to keep ammonia under .25ppm. Maybe a week or two after the ammonia readings, you will start to get nitrite reading. I also try to keep nitrites under .25ppm.
Keeping the toxic ammonia and nitrites this low will be a lot of hard work for a while. May have to do 25% or 50% water changes everyday till the cycle kicks in, but this will inflict less stress on the fish and help them live through it.
The ammonia is the first to drop to zero, a week or two latter nitrites will drop to zero. Then you are on easy street!! After you have a cycled tank, weekly 25-50% water changes will keep them nice and healthy!
Also, your tank will cycle even with the water changes and keeping levels low. I have done it this way on a few tanks and all my tanks cycled in 6 weeks or less.

You say you are a musician. What do you do? Very interesting. I live with a musician that builds guitar amps for a living.
Twistersmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2009, 05:45 AM   #7
 
I vote you use the 2.5 gallon tank for Dwarf African Frogs....so charming they are and a pair would like that space!

but of course having a quarentine tank is immensly wise.

:)
Katydid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2009, 06:21 AM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveh View Post
What would you recommend that I do, keeping in mind that the fish are already in the tank, and that I don't have a cycled tank to put them in while the new tank cycles?

I appreciate the advice, but you are coming off as a bit harsh, considering I'm new at this...
I apologize for seeming harsh. I don't mean to be. Okay, so getting down to business. I would suggest feeding your fish a little less than normal especially since you have gold fish...they are poop machines. This should decrease the amount of poop and thus ammonia. Other than this I can't think of anything that will not stress the fish. If you know the temperature range specific for your fishes (if you don't, then stop reading, find out the ranges and make sure your tank temp is in that range) crank the heat to the top of that range. Increased temperature will increase the reaction rate. That's about it. If you have any more questions about aquariums and/or cycling you can PM me.
plessans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2009, 08:17 AM   #9
 
steveh's Avatar
 
Thanks all for the advice! Unfortunately, I lost the Shubunkin ("Jack") last night, presumably due to the somewhat unhappy state he had been in in the previous tank. However, the Black Moor is now exhibiting odd, somewhat erratic behavior, and doesn't seem interested in eating the shelled/cooked pea I put in there for him. I'm worried that by the time the fish store opens and I can get the water tested (and the water testing kit, as recommended by Twistersmom), the fish will be gone. I realize somewhat morbidly that this would be an excellent time to cycle the tank fishless, but I'd really like to save the poor guy. I guess without a test kit, all I can do is hope (unless y'all think it would be OK to add some more de-ammonia stuff?)
steveh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2009, 09:24 AM   #10
 
Twistersmom's Avatar
 
Adding more de- ammonia stuff will not hurt, but if I have fish not acting healthy, I do a water changes. Clean water is the best meds for you fish.
Hopefully he is just sad and lonely. Keep us posted on the test results.
Twistersmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New BiUbe owner seeks general advice ldsdbomber Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 6 01-13-2010 12:04 AM
National Geographic Seeks Tiger Fish Footage National Geographic Freshwater and Tropical Fish 6 07-26-2008 01:35 AM
I would love some advice. NEW FISH OWNER here! bchballer86 Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 6 04-13-2008 07:42 AM
Novice seeks advice. DIY or reef ready tank? Greshman Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 1 03-25-2008 12:03 AM


Tags
beginner, black moor, goldfish, shubunkin

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:29 PM.