New aquarium... sort of (HELP!)
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New aquarium... sort of (HELP!)

This is a discussion on New aquarium... sort of (HELP!) within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I just lost the last fish in my tank to ick yesterday after what I'm guessing was an accidental overdose of Ick-Guard II . ...

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New aquarium... sort of (HELP!)
Old 11-26-2011, 09:56 PM   #1
 
Exclamation New aquarium... sort of (HELP!)

I just lost the last fish in my tank to ick yesterday after what I'm guessing was an accidental overdose of Ick-Guard II . I had 3 amano shrimp in the tank and was able to isolate them to a 2 gallon bowl with water acquired from the fish store. I have completely cleaned the tank top to bottom, boiling and rinsing off all the rocks, tubes, ornaments, etc. that went in the tank, so it's a clean slate. I've put everything back together and refilled the tank with the addition of some Jungle Start Right, and it has been running for a day now.

So my question is: What steps should I take to get the shrimp back to the tank, and how soon can I add new fish?

It's a 4 gallon bowl (small, I know, but it functioned perfectly for 2 years while supporting 3 fish and 3 shrimp without a hitch until introducing a new fish with ick about week ago.) And the water the shrimp are currently residing in came from the same fish store that sold me the ick fish, so I'm not sure how to avoid re-introducing the ick to the tank. I'm also wondering if it would be better to get a new fish in the tank to build up some bio-debris for the shrimp to munch on before placing them back in the tank. If the fish store uses the same nets in all their tanks, wouldn't all their tanks be infected now?

Sorry for all the questions, but I've found myself in quite a predicament
and I don't know how long the shrimp will last without aeration! They're living off a piece of plant the store gave me with their water when I purchased the Ick Guard II. (I had a yoyo botia)
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:26 AM   #2
 
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Welcome to the forum. Sorry for your problems, but the good news is, ick won't survive without a host. I'd reset the bowl and let it go for for at least a couple of weeks with only the shrimp. Ich life cycle can run 1-8 weeks, depending on ambient temperature. If your bowl is at 78F/25C or so, the parasite should clear in less than 2 weeks maximum. Realize virtually any fish you get from a store will carry ick, it's the "common cold" of fishkeeping, but a cold won't typically kill you! Perhaps this is a good opportunity to upgrade to a 10-gallon and use the bowl as a quarantine tank for future fishes?

Ick won't bother the shrimp. but some ick treatments will!
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:45 AM   #3
 
So I should be able to move the shrimp back to the tank now, or should I let it process with the Start Right for a few more days? Thanks for your help!

I don't have the space for a larger tank right now, otherwise I would gladly set one up. We've got a 55, a 50, two 45's, and a 30 hex in the basement, but we're remodeling the house right now and putting on an addition, so there's no room to spare at the moment.
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Old 11-28-2011, 06:56 AM   #4
 
I've not moved the shrimp back over yet, I'm still trying to figure out if it's safe. A friend told me most LFS's will do a water test for free if you bring in a sample; has anyone had any similar experience with this?
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Old 11-28-2011, 07:50 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajgrabenstein View Post
So I should be able to move the shrimp back to the tank now, or should I let it process with the Start Right for a few more days? Thanks for your help!

I don't have the space for a larger tank right now, otherwise I would gladly set one up. We've got a 55, a 50, two 45's, and a 30 hex in the basement, but we're remodeling the house right now and putting on an addition, so there's no room to spare at the moment.
If you have disease free existing tank's running with fish, I would borrow a cup full of substrate from one of these tank's and place it in the toe section of ladies nylon and drop this in the bowl.
should be able to add shrimp immediately.
The borrowed substrate will have some needed bacteria to processs the waste created in the bowl by the shrimp and perhaps two or three small tetra like fishes which is about all a four gallon bowl will support.
Opinion's vary.
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Old 11-28-2011, 08:04 AM   #6
 
Getting more fish/substrate from the same store wouldn't reintroduce the ick again?
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Old 11-28-2011, 09:49 AM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajgrabenstein View Post
Getting more fish/substrate from the same store wouldn't reintroduce the ick again?
You mention four other tank's running at home. One of these tank's is where I would borrow the substrate .
Would not add fish for at least three weeks and then,,would add no more than three or four very small fish like endler's ,guppies,whiteclouds.
Most health issues with fish can be directly related to water quality or lack thereof.
Small bowl's are notoriously difficult to maintain a balance, for they are easily influenced by temp changes,and waste produced by fish. In smaller volume of water ,, water qualitywill ALWAY'S be more problematic than in larger volume of water.Add to this possible over feeding,irregular water changes, and fishes suffer = stress = sick fishes.
I personally would not place fish in anything smaller than 10 gal and even then,, six small fishes such as those mentioned,,would be the limit in my view .
Some plant's and shrimp would be all i would attempt in bowl.
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Old 11-28-2011, 12:15 PM   #8
 
Oh, I apologize, I wasn't clear. The other tanks are currently inactive. They're in storage in the basement at the moment because of the lack of space upstairs due to remodeling being done on the house. But I may be able to get some of the substrate you mentioned from a friend with an established tank, so I'll try that.

The bowl ran successfully with a painted tetra, a yoyo botia, swordtail, and 3 shrimp for two years, but after the tetra died from old age (I had it for about a year before starting the bowl), I replaced him with a platy, and I'm figuring that's when the ick was introduced.

I am planning on only getting a small school of similar fish this time. I've seen the whiteclouds you mentioned reccommended on several other sites, so I may try them.

Thank you so much for all of your help!

My dad used to run the other tanks in the house, but we haven't had one set up for about 5+ years now, and I missed having fish in the house, so I'm learning the ropes myself now.
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Old 11-28-2011, 01:07 PM   #9
 
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A 4g bowl is not sufficient space for any of those fish. I realize you say this "worked" for a year, but now you have lost all the fish and I would venture to say it is largely due to the fact that they were in too small a space.

Fish need space for two reasons: physical space to "be themselves," and sufficient space for sufficient water stability. If this is not provided, the fish growth will be affected, what is termed stunting; the internal organs try to develop normally but the fish's skeleton can't, so trouble. Fish grow continually, and space is crucial from the moment they are born.

Another related aspect is behaviours and numbers. Tetra are shoaling fish and must be in groups. They have interactions within the group that nature through evolution has programmed into the fish. Denied this, they are under severe stress which weakens their immune system and this too contributes to other issues.

A 4-5 gallon tank has very limited use when it comes to fish. Please be mindful of your fish's needs and provide them, or don't attempt keeping them. The same thing will occur again. You can read about fish requirements in our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top. Those species mentioned are in the profiles.


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Old 11-28-2011, 01:22 PM   #10
 
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I'll also add this is why a quarantine tank for new fish is such a good idea. You can isolate them and watch for any issues before you put them in your main tank. This way instead of wiping out you're entire tank, you'll only lose what's in the QT.
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amano shrimp, ick disease, new aquarium, reintroduction, small tank

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