New 20 Long Planted, stocking suggestions? - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » New 20 Long Planted, stocking suggestions?

New 20 Long Planted, stocking suggestions?

This is a discussion on New 20 Long Planted, stocking suggestions? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> They should be fine. I'll point you to the fish profiles here on the site, pretty much all the fish you are considering are ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Platy
Platy
Pepper Cory
Pepper Cory
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
New 20 Long Planted, stocking suggestions?
Old 07-10-2012, 12:44 PM   #11
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
They should be fine.

I'll point you to the fish profiles here on the site, pretty much all the fish you are considering are in there I believe. It's on the blue bar at the top of the page, second link. You may have noticed that if you type the name on the forums the same as it is listed in the profile the name gets highlighted blue and it makes a link automatically to the profile. They aren't ads, so feel free to click on them ;) For example, Dwarf Gourami.

Some of the profiles will mention if fish are most often wild caught, for example Oto Catfish. You can also try asking the store, some are better than others in knowing the origin of their fish (almost all get their fish from distributors). There is nothing wrong with wild caught fish (they can actually be more hardy since they are not inbred for generations) but they do come from 'ideal' water so you'll have to match that.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 01:12 PM   #12
 
Drift's Avatar
 
I have been digging through the profiles for a few days now actually. I feel like everything is either soft water or hard. No real in between types other than fish that seem to be able to withstand large ranges, like glow light tetras.
Like cardinal tetras I would be at the end of their requirements according to this website but on others they seem to have a wider range? The same with the dwarf gourami.
And then quantity is an issue. I don't want to overstock the tank, but want to make sure that ea h fish is in a large enough group.
I really like the blue eyed rainbow fish and it's variants.
Posted via Mobile Device
Drift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 06:50 PM   #13
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
Go by the numbers given for water hardness, not the words like "soft".

Group size numbers are usually 6 or more for the small fish. With Gourami you would only want a single one probably in a 20 gallon.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 08:36 PM   #14
 
Drift's Avatar
 
First, let me just say I really appreciate you coming back and keeping up with my obnoxious amount of questions.
I fell in love with Celestial Pearl Danios, but they need soft water. :( Disappointing.

I was thinking of Glowlight Tetra and Blue Eyed Rainbowfish. With some type of Cory to cruise the bottom. Oto's don't seem like the would be a good fit?

And of course some shrimp!
Drift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2012, 07:09 AM   #15
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
You should be okay with Oto's, they are okay up to 12 dGH and you are 8-9 dGH. They just need a stable environment, so it would be best to wait until the tank is established biologically before adding them (a couple months).

When stocking your fish, go slow. Only add one type at a time, and wait a week or two before adding more. This will give the tank time to adjust to the increases in waste.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2012, 08:16 AM   #16
 
Drift's Avatar
 
Well. I think that's the plan then. :) I introduced 6 Glowlight Tetra's last night. They've been zooming around like crazy and eating random plant debris.
And again, thank you!
Drift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2012, 06:51 PM   #17
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
I have been digging through the profiles for a few days now actually. I feel like everything is either soft water or hard. No real in between types other than fish that seem to be able to withstand large ranges, like glow light tetras.
In very general terms, this is rather true in fact. Many of our fish do occur in water that is very soft. Most (but not all) of the characins, Cyprinids, catfish, anabantids, many catfish. At the opposite end are the harder water species like all livebearers, rift lake cichlids, some of the rainbowfish, and a few Cyprinids and catfish. Some of the latter are true hard water, some are more slightly hard/basic.

Having said that, there is some amount of flexibility. Sometimes this has no apparent impact on the species, sometimes it does with a shorter lifespan because the fish is being forced to live in conditions that it was not designed for and this takes a toll. Which leads me to your next sentence.

Quote:
Like cardinal tetras I would be at the end of their requirements according to this website but on others they seem to have a wider range? The same with the dwarf gourami.
The ranges used in our fish profiles are those recommended by ichthyologists and biologists. The fish will be more likely to live a normal and healthy life in such water. When the parameters are exceeded, such fish usually have a harder time maintaining their physiological equilibrium, the internal processes that sustain its daily life. This can wear the fish down, weaken its immune system, cause stress...any number of things. Obviously our aim is to maintain the fish in the best possible environment so it will be as healthy as possible.

Cardinal tetra are sensitive fish designed for very soft and acidic water. Most will be wild caught, which means their adaptability is limited, if the long healthy life is expected. The dwarf gourami is less sensitive, but unfortunately generations of inbreeding in the Far East have seriously weakened this fish, to the point where many recommend never buying it. The profile explains this more.

Quote:
And then quantity is an issue. I don't want to overstock the tank, but want to make sure that ea h fish is in a large enough group.
Shoaling fish (those that live in groups) have needs for this, so adequate numbers are essential. Here again, not providing this is removing a part of the fish's natural requirements and usually leads to adverse health, increased aggression, and always a shorter lifespan.

Quote:
I really like the blue eyed rainbow fish and it's variants.
There are several fish commonly given this name or a variant, so can you be more specific? I'm assuming the genus is Pseudomugil, but a species might allow me to provide some info on water. Some of these species have quite a variance in their habitats.

To your 20g long in general, there are many possible combinations from among the soft water fish. A GH around 7 dGH is soft; I keep my tanks around 5-6 dGH (for the plants, actually, to ensure sufficient calcium and magnesium) and my wild caught fish from very soft acidic waters do fine. The pH will likely drop below 7 a bit, and that would be ideal.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2012, 08:08 PM   #18
 
Udra120's Avatar
 
My twenty long set up

1 Flame guorami
3 white skirt tetras
3 cherry barbs
7 neon tetras


As for the gourami, my water is very hard and my flame gourami never seemed to mind it at all. Saw this on an earlier post. If you havent gotten one, you definately should! They are beautiful and really not shy if the room is quiet. Mine is unafraid of everything except noise? He loves to go in and out of plants and nibble on them.
Udra120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2012, 10:55 PM   #19
 
Drift's Avatar
 
Thank you for all the great info Byron. So my Gh is 7 then? That makes me feel a bit better. Haha!
I've pretty much ruled out the Gourami. I'm more of a fan of the smaller types of fish.

I was referring to the Fork tail blue eye's specifically. (Pseudomugil furcatus)

However, if Celestial Pearl Danio's would work I prefer them over the rainbowfish. I have no idea why, but i'm in love with these expensive little buggers.

I have already added 6 Glowlight Tetras and they have adapted pretty well already. Two were displaying what I assume breeding behaviors in the plants earlier today and eating with no issues too. Oh and the good old ghost shrimp, about 8 of them cruising around. I've never had luck with them so I wanted to see if it is me or my betta's really assassinating them at night. :P
I do want to add a couple more Glowlight's too, but not sure of the quantity here.

Also Oto vs Cory's. I may be wrong, but I feel 3 different types of fish seems to be more than enough in a 20 long. Oto's are winning my heart lately. :P
Drift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2012, 12:15 PM   #20
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drift View Post
Thank you for all the great info Byron. So my Gh is 7 then? That makes me feel a bit better. Haha!
I've pretty much ruled out the Gourami. I'm more of a fan of the smaller types of fish.

I was referring to the Fork tail blue eye's specifically. (Pseudomugil furcatus)

However, if Celestial Pearl Danio's would work I prefer them over the rainbowfish. I have no idea why, but i'm in love with these expensive little buggers.

I have already added 6 Glowlight Tetras and they have adapted pretty well already. Two were displaying what I assume breeding behaviors in the plants earlier today and eating with no issues too. Oh and the good old ghost shrimp, about 8 of them cruising around. I've never had luck with them so I wanted to see if it is me or my betta's really assassinating them at night. :P
I do want to add a couple more Glowlight's too, but not sure of the quantity here.

Also Oto vs Cory's. I may be wrong, but I feel 3 different types of fish seems to be more than enough in a 20 long. Oto's are winning my heart lately. :P
I personally would have corys first, since they will be more interest. In a 20g long you can have a group of 5-9 roughly; no less than five ever, as they need a group. One species of 5-9, or two species with 3-5 of each, or three species of 3-4 each... whatever. The otos are more sensitive, and if you like them no less than 3 (they too are shoaling fish) but if algae is your concern there are a couple other alternative that will be just as useful with algae but add more interest as fish. Twig Catfish with your soft water is one.

If you intend keeping the glowlights, I would get 2-3 more. Then another species that is compatible, maybe 7-9 depending what it is. Might be room for yet another, but without knowing exactly the species, can't say.

Celestial Pearl Danio as noted in the profile is best on its own. I won't repeat that info.

Pseudomugil furcatus will not do well in your soft water, this is a medium hard to hard water fish. More info here, since this species is not in our profiles:
Pseudomugil furcatus (Forktail Blue-eye) — Seriously Fish

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY 20g Long Stand help/suggestions mjbn DIY Aquarium 6 12-06-2011 01:15 AM
Suggestions on stocking a 55g DKRST Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 8 03-06-2011 06:56 PM
stocking suggestions for 15 gal. please? dorabaker Freshwater and Tropical Fish 10 08-24-2010 01:14 AM
filter suggestions for 20 gallon long Gilbert Freshwater Aquarium Equipment 12 10-05-2009 08:39 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 AM.