Need help identifying Cory - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 03:44 PM
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Well shes a strong lil 1!

26 Gallon Community:
5 Platies

4 Mollies

3 Guppys

1 Swordtail
11 Neon Tetras
1 Red Tailed Shark
Opaline Gourami
BN Pleco
Snakes-
Coral: Rat X Corn
CoCo: Rat

R.I.P Saphire You'll always be in my heart






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post #12 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 04:02 PM
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The fish pictured is Corydoras trilineatus. In the text under "Description" in our profiles of the similar-looking species, it tells how you can usually differentiate them; I say "usually" because they all can vary from fish to fish as noted therein. But C. trilineatus has a reticulated pattern on the head rather than spots, and even though your photos are not crystal clear, this reticulated pattern is evident.

Do you have more than 1? A trio at minimum is best, 5 if you have space. As there are other corys in the tank, 3 would be fine.

As for cross-breeding, this is not common or likely to occur but it is perhaps possible. Checking with my colleagues at Planet Catfish, it appears that if there are males and females of each species in a tank, the fish are unlikely to spawn cross-species. [Another reason for having 3-5 of each]. According to German published research, there are some species that will spawn with another specific species; C. trilineatus is listed as possible cross-breeding with C. metae. Obviously this has little to do with external patterning as these two species are not at all closely patterned, and the belief is that cory species that are genetically farther removed from each other are more likely to cross-breed. Corys occurring naturally within the same habitat (stream for instance) are genetically diverse and highly unlikely to ever cross-breed. Most serious aquarists do not advocate attempts to cross-breed species, due to the issues this raises for the species. And in these days of dwindling wild populations, this is very sensible.

As for sexing corys, as it mentions in our profiles of each species this is next to impossible as there are no external differences. However, in non-juvenile fish females are generally rounder in build, especially when viewed from directly above.

I hope I've answered your questions.

Note: The initial post was duplicated in the catfish section, and since all the replies aside from my original are here, I will delete the thread in Catfish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #13 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 04:31 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I have a 10 gallon tank with 4 Albinos who spawn like crazy (also some Otos in there.). This fish came with a tank I found on craigslist, and I thought that I could put the new one in with them to satisfy its need for others of its species... I don't really have room in there for a couple more of the Three Stripe Cories (According to Byron's ID. Thanks!). Will the company of the Albinos suffice for now, or should I think about possibly relocating the Otos into one of my other tanks and introduce a few more of the Three Stripes?
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post #14 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 04:49 PM
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I have a 10 gallon tank with 4 Albinos who spawn like crazy (also some Otos in there.). This fish came with a tank I found on craigslist, and I thought that I could put the new one in with them to satisfy its need for others of its species... I don't really have room in there for a couple more of the Three Stripe Cories (According to Byron's ID. Thanks!). Will the company of the Albinos suffice for now, or should I think about possibly relocating the Otos into one of my other tanks and introduce a few more of the Three Stripes?
In such circumstances, one has to consider the effects of the options. The options being, to leave 1 C. trilineatus with 4 C. aeneus albino, or add 2 C. trilineatus and increase the corys to 7 in a 10g. I have no hesitation in recommending the latter.

With proper maintenance (weekly partial water change, not overfeeding, etc), the fish in this case will not be stressed by space limitations as they are compatible, social, and not a significant impact in terms of bioload. No mention is made of upper fish, so I am assuming few or none. The oto are similar to corys in many respects, and also need a group, so they could stay or be relocated if a suitable tank is available.

In balance, option 1 is more likely to cause stress to the lone C. trilineatus. And stress breeds health issues.

If the otos can be moved to another tank, could the C. trilineatus be moved (along with a couple more of course)?

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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I think that my options are as follows:

1. I could put two more of the cories in question into the catfish tank, making it 7 cories and 5 otos.

2. I could relocate the otos or one of the groups of cories to my 29 gallon (already heavily stocked and lacking any algea at all thanks to the bristlenose.)

3. I could relocate the otos or either group of cories to the other 10 gallon I have (Contains a female Kribensis and a rubberlip pleco. There is a pretty good amount of algae in there, which the plec keeps at reasonable levels.)

4. I could relocate the otos to the tank I keep running for raising fry. (currently has 30ish albino cory fry in it.)


Would the Otos make a meal out of cory fry/eggs?


I perform weekly 50% pwc in all of my aquariums, so I don't think that nitrate levels will become an issue. I can up the Water changes either in volume or frequency if necessary.


I would be concerned about option 1 due to overstocking. I could easily keep up with water changes to offset this though.

Option 2 sounds ok, but there is no algae in there for the otos.

Option 3 would be alright if the Krib wasn't so picky about her tankmates. Also, I would be concerned about the otos eating down all of the plec's food.

And I don't like option 4 much, My "nursery" tank is bare bottomed and boring. Not really show material.



A fifth option also exists, but it would have to be postponed. I am in the process of setting up a 55G tank one piece at a time. But it will be a few months before I feel comfortable stocking it.




Hmmmm.... I may have answered my own question. Option 1 seems to be the way to go... Or rehoming something.... Which I absolutely loathe doing! :P




*** EDIT*** Byron, I just saw your question about upper fish and relocating the cory in question.

There are no upper column fish in that particular tank. Just Cories and Otos.

And I could potentially relocate the striped cory into another tank along with a few more, but space is a bit limited at the moment. I have 4 tanks, all pretty well stocked.

Last edited by DanMarion; 11-11-2010 at 05:17 PM.
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post #16 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 05:36 PM
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From your info, I would myself have no problem with the corys (7) and oto in the 10g; I assume it is planted too. Your 50% water change weekly is fine; this plus plants will maintain low nitrates.

The corys (C. trilineatus) in the 29 is fine too, assuming the upper fish are OK with corys; for instance, I would not out of choice put them with the kribs, cichlids can be belligerent with some corys. I would not put otos in simply because of the competition for algae from the BN, same for the other tank. Not suggestion squabbles or anything, just that providing "natural" food where possible will be better for such fish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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Great, option 1 sounds like a winner then. Thanks so much for all the info once again Byron! I have no idea what my aquatic environments would look like today without all of the advice you've given over the months!
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post #18 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 06:32 PM
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Great, option 1 sounds like a winner then. Thanks so much for all the info once again Byron! I have no idea what my aquatic environments would look like today without all of the advice you've given over the months!
You're very welcome.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #19 of 20 Old 11-11-2010, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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One last simple question and then I will consider all of my information needs to have been met!

Where could I purchase a couple of Corydoras trilineatus? I thoroughly read the profile here and a few of them on other sites, and it seems that they are often confused at the LFS with Juliis. How can I be sure that I am getting the trilineatus? I would hate to buy 2 more and find out that they won't spawn because they are not the same Cories.
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post #20 of 20 Old 11-13-2010, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by DanMarion View Post
One last simple question and then I will consider all of my information needs to have been met!

Where could I purchase a couple of Corydoras trilineatus? I thoroughly read the profile here and a few of them on other sites, and it seems that they are often confused at the LFS with Juliis. How can I be sure that I am getting the trilineatus? I would hate to buy 2 more and find out that they won't spawn because they are not the same Cories.
Memorize the external differences. The patterning on the head is the most reliable, though not guaranteed. Julii are spotted, whereas trilineatus has a reticulated pattern. If you want another photo of what reticulated is, check out the Corydoras reticulatus, the entire body is this patterning. Sort of squiggly lines randomly, if that makes any sense. C. julii always has a spotted pattern on the head, and is a bit smaller/stockier, though in juvenile or young fish this would not be so obvious by comparison. Unless your store receives wild caught fish, any "Julii" will more likely be C. trilineatus as C. julii are much less common.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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