My new 45l aquarium! - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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My new 45l aquarium!

Hi, I'v had my first aquarium up and running now for a week. The capacity is 45L and have 2 large live plants and 2 small along with a couple of fancy hiding places. I am now about to add some fish but was wondering about number and combinations to add. Could someone please advise based on the following list.

2 x Cherry Barbs
2 x Glass Bloodfin Tetra
2 x Chocolate Gouramis
1 x Rainbow Shark
8 x Cardinal Tetra
2 x Guppies
1 x Fighter
2x Panda Corry's

Would It be possible to house all of the above or what combination is advised?
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post #2 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 02:14 PM
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Welcome to the hobby and the forum.

A 45 litre aquarim is approximately 12 US gallons [I think better in gallons]. You will have some problems with your proposed stocking, both in terms of number of fish and even worse the different species. Some of these are not compatible.

The rainbow shark with a mature size of 6 inches will quickly outgrow this space. And they can be territorial and aggressive, especially with other bottom fish. I would recommend you exclude this fish from your list.

I don't know what a "Fighter" fish is--do you mean a Siamese Betta? If so, no to that with most of the other fish. I think most beta keepers would recommend solitary or housed with suitable bottom fish, but they can comment accordingly.

Chocolate gouramis are acknowledged as one of the most difficult fish for many aquarists to maintain. They are extremely sensitive to water parameters and water quality, and prone to develop skin parasites if not maintained in very stable and acceptable water. I have previously maintained these fish and can vouch for the parasite problem. I also have them now, both the Sphaerichthys osphromenoides osphromenoides species (the original or common chocolate gourami) and the much rarer Sphaerichthys osphromenoides selatanensis that closely resembles the former. These are definitely not fish for beginning aquarists. Aside from the very important considerations over water, there are limited options for suitable tankmates.

A group of 8 cardinal tetras would be fine, and a group of 3-5 corydoras like pandas would be good. Corydoras, like the tetras and all characins, are shoaling fish that prefer to be (and live healthier lives) in groups, minimum 3 for corys but preferably more. Tetras should be in groups of six minimum, or more if space permits. Which brings me to the Bloodfins, good companions for cardinals and corys but in a group of 5-6. Barbs are the same re groups, but adding them with the others in this tank is getting crowded and I wouldn't.

Don't forget the tank has to cycle once the fish are in it; you mention having two large plants, that is a good start. I would also get a small bottle of Seachem's Stability, it is a biological supplement that is live bacteria to "seed" the tank. This plus the plants should handle the ammonia and nitrite from the first fish, but only put a few fish in at first; maybe the 5-6 bloodfins on their own. After a few days, add the cardinals (or the pandas), then a few days later the pandas (or the cardinals). This allows the bacteria time to multiply to handle the increased ammonia, even though the plants--if healthy and growing--will do most of this. Be regular in your weekly partial water change of 25-35%, and you will have a very beautiful and healthy aquarium.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 02:52 PM
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Hello,
I'd suggest to stay with one group (as most fish prefer to be kept in groups) Eg. a school of 8-10 Tetra's and then a group of 5 corry's.
Some of the fish you'd like to have will get too big for the size tank you have.
Fish such as your listed Guppies will have a TON baby's and when I say a TON I mean that, they will outnumber anyone in your tank in no time at all, and then again its overcrowded.
An alternative to any of what you have listed that may be of interest to you is simply to stock the tank with Shrimp (red cherry shrimp is my fav) they are a lot of fun to watch and also they will breed, however it will take a long time before they outgrow your tank.

And keep an eye on Byron's suggestions above, specially a proper cycling is very important.
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post #4 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 05:43 PM
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I have nothing to add to what the others suggest (good suggestions too!) but wanted to welcome you to the forum!

If you don't stand up for something you'll fall for anything...
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post #5 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 08:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks very much for the replies and hi back to all!!

I have a bottle of filter start solution, do i add a little everytime i do a water change?
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post #6 of 8 Old 08-27-2009, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stebro04 View Post
Thanks very much for the replies and hi back to all!!

I have a bottle of filter start solution, do i add a little everytime i do a water change?
What exactly is this filter start solution? Once a tank is biologically established, all you need to add when you do a partial water change is water conditioner to remove chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals (and some will detoxify ammonia which is fine). If this filter starter is one of the biological supplements then no, it's not needed every partial water change, only at the startup of a new tank. It cannot be overdosed so it does no harm, but is wasted and most of us would rather spend money on fish than unnecessary products. I may revise my answer when I know the product name, so pardon me for making the assumption.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 8 Old 08-28-2009, 08:32 AM
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You don't even necessarily need it to start the tank IMO & Experiences unless you wanna spent extra $. I just always simply set my tanks up, let them cycle properly and then ad fish. No special nothing involved.
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post #8 of 8 Old 08-28-2009, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel079 View Post
You don't even necessarily need it to start the tank IMO & Experiences unless you wanna spent extra $. I just always simply set my tanks up, let them cycle properly and then ad fish. No special nothing involved.
That's correct if you want to take the time to cycle the tank, anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks depending upon the water, how, etc. It takes time for nitrosomonas and nitrospira bacteria to establish and "seeding" the tank with live bacteria from an established aquarim or with biological supplements like Stability allows you to cycle the tank in one day. Using plants does the same. I've written at length on how this works in my post in this thread: http://www.fishforum.com/freshwater-...ishless-27878/

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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