Is it to many ? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 5 Old 03-21-2012, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
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Is it to many ?

I have 11 lemon tetra's
Dwarf blue gourami
Red tail shark
4 angels

I would like to know if I add 6 more angel fish if it would be to much in a 55 gal aquarium
could someone please let me know.. Thank You
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post #2 of 5 Old 03-21-2012, 02:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bulldogowner2 View Post
I have 11 lemon tetra's
Dwarf blue gourami
Red tail shark
4 angels

I would like to know if I add 6 more angel fish if it would be to much in a 55 gal aquarium
could someone please let me know.. Thank You
Yes it would be too many. Not to mention you shouldn't have Gouramis and Angels together either. Not to sure the Red Tailed shark with the Angels is a good idea.
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post #3 of 5 Old 03-21-2012, 02:40 AM
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Would not add any more fish to this system.
Folks often buy these cute little Angelfish the size of nickels, or quarter, while perhaps not considering that these little fish can grow to the size of a man's palm in a year or less with good care.
I personally think the Red tail shark will be alright with the fish mentioned for it /they, tend to frequent the bottom of the tank, but would not place any other bottom dweller's with it, due to territorial nature of the shark.
Would personally re-home the blue Dwarf Gourami who are more often as not,subject or prone to Iridovirus,mycobacterium,which is untreatable and possibly contagious to other species.
They are not a fish worth keeping in my view .(often sickly)
Lemon tetra's should be fine with the Angelfish you have,and I would add a few more of these if anything, to this system.IMHO

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #4 of 5 Old 03-21-2012, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
Would not add any more fish to this system.
Folks often buy these cute little Angelfish the size of nickels, or quarter, while perhaps not considering that these little fish can grow to the size of a man's palm in a year or less with good care.
I personally think the Red tail shark will be alright with the fish mentioned for it /they, tend to frequent the bottom of the tank, but would not place any other bottom dweller's with it, due to territorial nature of the shark.
Would personally re-home the blue Dwarf Gourami who are more often as not,subject or prone to Iridovirus,mycobacterium,which is untreatable and possibly contagious to other species.
They are not a fish worth keeping in my view .(often sickly)
Lemon tetra's should be fine with the Angelfish you have,and I would add a few more of these if anything, to this system.IMHO
I agree about the gourami, it is a beautiful fish but more likely to be sickly. If you like him that much and he seems happy you can always see how it works out. Mine didn't do too well so I gave him back.

The tetras do best is groups as you have them, but as always the more the better. If they are skittish or aggressive then I'd recommend getting more.

For your angels:

Size

Attains six inches in length, and the vertical span of the fins can reach 8-10 inches.

Minimum Tank Suggestion

48 inches in length (55g and up) for a small group; a mated pair can be kept in a 36-inch tank.

Read more: Scalare Angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) Profile

Given that information I would say your 4 angels in the 55 are good but some what too crowded (ideally you'd want a 75 for 4-6 angels because they will grow to be so big). If you want more angels, go for a 100+ gallon tank.

that is assuming you have scalare angelfish...
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post #5 of 5 Old 03-21-2012, 05:12 PM
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I concur with other members. I'll just add something not mentioned yet, and that is the problem that often occurs if new angelfish are added to an existing group.

When a group of angels become settled in any aquarium, that space is "theirs" to own. Within the group there is usually a pecking order, a dominant male and the subordinate fish (other males and females). As soon as a newcomer is added, he/she is seen as invading the existing angel's space. Sometimes the intruder is tolerated and even accepted, but this is frankly rare; most often it will be pursued vigorously until it is killed. In the wild, the intruder would simply swim somewhere else out of sight and smell. This is not possible in the confines of even the largest aquarium, unless it is in the thousands of gallons as in a public aquarium.

So, be happy with the 4 existing angels, and be thankful if they are getting along; this is never a certainty either.

I would add other fish though, as tankmates. The shark makes substrate fish impossible, and I would even go so far as to consider removing it. Upper fish are sometimes suddenly targeted by this species, even if all seems fine for a few months. And when he/she gets to be 6 inches, it will be a force to be reckoned with. Removing it now would allow you more options. A group of one or more species of cory, or a Whiptail catfish, or a pleco (one of the small species).

Lemon tetra at 11 is fine. Another similar shoaling fish could be added, some of the species in the Rosy clade of Hyphessobrycon are suitable (some are certainly not, so select carefully). The Roberts Tetra and Rosy Tetra are two I always suggest because with their beautiful deep burgundy/red colouration they are a nice contrast to the black/white of angels. The medium rasbora also work. Avoid any small or torpedo-shaped fish as these will likely end up being lunch; neons and cardinals for instance are not good with angelfish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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