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Male Rainbow chasing female-normal?

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Male Rainbow chasing female-normal?
Old 06-22-2013, 04:55 PM   #11
 
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I have to target feed my Bolivian Ram, as he is the most timid with other fish, and backs off (won't fight for food) so I have to be sure some drops down practically on top of him so he'll get some. He's not the brightest crayon in the box, lol. He takes forever to decide to go for a morsel, and by then, another fish often gets it. So I have to "police" them.
The Bolivian Ram is a substrate feeder [the scientific name for this genus is Mikrogeophagus, which is from the Greek for small eartheater, a reference to its eating habits] and should be fed sinking foods (tablets, pellets, disks, etc). In my years of keeping and spawning this species, I have never known it to feed from the surface. My current male of five years eats alongside the corys from substrate sinking foods.

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I don't remember where I read that a pair of rainbows is alright. I know I read a LOT about them. I read a male and female, or two of one sex would be good. Now I know better! I've read horror stories of one being ganged up on and killed, and thought there would be less chance of that with just a pair. Oh boy
The reliability of what we read on the internet is only as good as the reliability of the source. We have profiles of many fish in our Reference Material area. Currently, we only have three rainbowfish species, and Melanotaenia lacustris is not one of them. But it is a shoaling fish like the other species, meaning it needs a group, as Mikaila mentioned. This is noted in our introduction to the Athernids.

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Old 06-22-2013, 10:52 PM   #12
 
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Yes, my Ram stays at the bottom mostly. He rarely even swims in the mid section. I do feed him sinking foods--I soak his cichlid pellets until they sink, and he gets a variety of frozen foods as well as shrimp pellets and tubifex.

I wish I had read the fish reference on this board before getting Rainbows. The 55 will be able to hold two more females without badly overstocking. I'll have 34 inches of fish in a 55 gallon. (One of my cories died). Is that pushing it too much?
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Old 06-23-2013, 09:41 AM   #13
 
You don't stock by inches of fish. IMO your 55 gallon still has a lot of room, easily for a group of 6 rainbows. But I can't say that for certain because stocking depends on species requirements, current tank makes, filtration, the amount of tank maintenance(water changes, ect), Tank parameters, even aquarium dimensions come into play when stocking a tank.

Kribs might be fast in short bursts but a proper school of rainbows is very fast at feeding. A single rainbow will be much slower as they do not feel as secure. Seems a bit opposite what it should be but they are highly excitable fish and total pigs when it comes to food. They are still great fish tho, easily one of my favorites.
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Old 06-23-2013, 07:45 PM   #14
 
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I knew that the "one gallon per inch of fish" rule is old school, but I don't know how else to calculate, so I just figured each of my current fish are 2 inches, with the cory being 1 inch, the Ram being 3" and the rainbows will be about 3-4 inches when grown, and came up with approx. 34 inches of fish if I only get two more females. Do you think I should get three more? And one more male? I don't want to overstock and have filtration problems. I only run one filter (Penguin 350) in the 55 gallon. I do a 40% water change once a week, and vac the gravel. The tank is 48" long--a regulation 55 gallon. My parameters are excellent. Ammonia 0, Nitrites 0 and Nitrates average 10. I love the rainbows too. They are so endearing once they lose their fear of you. I like them almost as much as my female bettas!
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Old 06-23-2013, 07:59 PM   #15
 
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This present discussion points up why it is next to impossible to have "guides" to stocking. There are so many factors involved beyond mere fish size and water volume, though these are important.

Fish that are not maintained in an environment that is reasonably close to what they "expect" will be under constant stress. Each species has evolved to function best in a fairly specific set of environmental circumstances, and this includes water parameters, space, flows from the filter, numbers of the species, and how the tank is aquascaped. All these factor in to the equation of how many fish an aquarium can support, because these affect the fish's homeostasis and physiology. When everything provides what the fish needs, the fish will be healthier because it is less stressed and energy is not being wasted as it is when the factors are at variance with the fish's needs.

Zeroing in on just the numbers. Shoaling fish need a group for various reasons that almost always include "safety in numbers," but in many species also involve social interaction. When this is absent, as it is when a shoaling species is kept with 2 or 3 or even 4, the fish are under more stress because "something is wrong" to the fish. Within reason of course, having more of the species in the aquarium will ease this stress, and that means the individual fish are not creating as much of an impact on the tank's biological system, so it can then support them and perhaps more than would be the case otherwise.

The first scientific study on fish numbers has proven beyond any doubt that shoaling fish need at least five in their group, or aggression is significantly increased even in species that would normally show none, or relatively none, to themsevles and other fish in the tank. "Five" however cannot be taken as a magic number, any more than six can, because each species is unique. But for the species in the test, which I know included angelfish and some tetras and danios, it was very clear that keeping the fish in groups of five or more resulted in far less aggressive behaviours.

I don't know how well I explained that, so please feel free to ask if I hashed it up.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 06-23-2013 at 08:04 PM..
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Old 06-23-2013, 08:06 PM   #16
 
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I think I understand what you are saying, Byron. In a roundabout way, you are telling me I need more than 4 rainbows. So I will get one more male and two more females. That will bring my total to 5. I hope this will be agreeable to the fish, and if not, I can always return the rainbows and stick with something else that isn't a schooling or shoaling species. I would have a tank full of female bettas, platies, and balloon mollies, but the bettas seem to come down with columnaris SO EASILY, and that is why I'm so cautious about adding more of them. I can't stand losing them, as they are so personable.
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Old 06-23-2013, 08:26 PM   #17
 
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think perhaps that is going to be the outcome: nuke the tank, or try a couple of fish in it to see if you still have problems.
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Old 06-23-2013, 08:34 PM   #18
 
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Can't nuke the tank! There are too many fish in it, and nowhere to put them! That's the only reason I haven't already done it. And to medicate it would cost a fortune, and I'd also be medicating fish that are perfectly healthy at the moment. I could nuke the quarantine tank, and already have, since no one is in there, but not the main tank.
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Old 06-24-2013, 11:05 AM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by RackinRocky View Post
I think I understand what you are saying, Byron. In a roundabout way, you are telling me I need more than 4 rainbows. So I will get one more male and two more females. That will bring my total to 5. I hope this will be agreeable to the fish, and if not, I can always return the rainbows and stick with something else that isn't a schooling or shoaling species. I would have a tank full of female bettas, platies, and balloon mollies, but the bettas seem to come down with columnaris SO EASILY, and that is why I'm so cautious about adding more of them. I can't stand losing them, as they are so personable.
Are you sure it is columnaris? I personally would not keep Betta in with these active fish, but what is done is done.
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Old 06-24-2013, 01:38 PM   #20
 
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Yes, my Ram stays at the bottom mostly. He rarely even swims in the mid section. I do feed him sinking foods--I soak his cichlid pellets until they sink, and he gets a variety of frozen foods as well as shrimp pellets and tubifex.

I wish I had read the fish reference on this board before getting Rainbows. The 55 will be able to hold two more females without badly overstocking. I'll have 34 inches of fish in a 55 gallon. (One of my cories died). Is that pushing it too much?
The old "inches of fish per gallon" *rule* of stocking is outdated and inaccurate. It does not take into account the different levels at which fish live, the depth of the fishes bodies, the varying bio-load different species can bring to the picture, etc.
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