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post #1 of 5 Old 06-08-2011, 05:16 PM Thread Starter
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Light Questions

We are close to having our new 110 gallon tank set up, we bought it used and it came with everything needed. When we set up the lights they were not as appealing as the lights on our other tanks. So today I went to the store and bought new bulbs. They are GE Aqua Ray made for aquariums brand. Well, after changing bulbs both ballasts buzz now. I changed back to the old bulbs and no buzz. What would cause this? Is it temporary or are the new bulbs not compatible? What about safety? Thank you for any and all of your help!
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post #2 of 5 Old 06-09-2011, 09:29 AM
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Buzzing may decrease the lifespan of your ballasts. I would suggest using different bulbs
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post #3 of 5 Old 06-09-2011, 10:58 AM
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Agree, it is likely that you bought tubes that do not "fit" the existing fixture.

The common fluorescent tube fixtures are what we call T8. The "T" number refers to the diameter of the tube that will work in the fixture, and the number is in eighths of an inch. So a T8 tube is 8/8 in diameter, or one inch obviously. The older type of fluorescents were T12, the tubes were thicker, 12/8 or 1.5 inches diameter. These are still available and will "fit" the same fixtures sort of, although they are being phased out by manufacturers because the T8's use less energy and are more efficient. Also, the newer T8's may "light" in the older fitures but sometimes with other issues, and this can be dangerous.

Then there are T5. These are 5/8 of an inch diameter, and will not work in T8 fixtures. And T8 tubes will not work in T5 fixtures.

There are others too, though I have not myself tried them.

Check the tubes that came with the fixture, and if they are T8 then that is what you must get to replace them. If T5, same.

Now to the appearance of the light. This depends entirely on the phosphors inside the tube that "burn" when the light is on. Manufacturers can vary the colour of light emitted by different phosphors. The colour temperature as it is called is measured in degrees kelvin, and will appear such as 6500K, 5000K, 10,000K etc. Mid-day sun is around 5500K. Lower kelvin numbers indicate a "warmer" light, with more red/.orange in the mix. Higher numbers like 10,000K indicate a "cooler" light with more blue/purple in the mix. How you light the tank is up to you, unless you have live plants.

If you have plants, you should get a "daylight" or "full spectrum" type of tube. These will have a kelvin rating between 6000K and 7000K. They provide the best plant light, and colour rendition of your fish and plants will be very close to the mid-day sun.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 5 Old 06-09-2011, 07:13 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Agree, it is likely that you bought tubes that do not "fit" the existing fixture.

The common fluorescent tube fixtures are what we call T8. The "T" number refers to the diameter of the tube that will work in the fixture, and the number is in eighths of an inch. So a T8 tube is 8/8 in diameter, or one inch obviously. The older type of fluorescents were T12, the tubes were thicker, 12/8 or 1.5 inches diameter. These are still available and will "fit" the same fixtures sort of, although they are being phased out by manufacturers because the T8's use less energy and are more efficient. Also, the newer T8's may "light" in the older fitures but sometimes with other issues, and this can be dangerous.

Then there are T5. These are 5/8 of an inch diameter, and will not work in T8 fixtures. And T8 tubes will not work in T5 fixtures.

There are others too, though I have not myself tried them.

Check the tubes that came with the fixture, and if they are T8 then that is what you must get to replace them. If T5, same.

Now to the appearance of the light. This depends entirely on the phosphors inside the tube that "burn" when the light is on. Manufacturers can vary the colour of light emitted by different phosphors. The colour temperature as it is called is measured in degrees kelvin, and will appear such as 6500K, 5000K, 10,000K etc. Mid-day sun is around 5500K. Lower kelvin numbers indicate a "warmer" light, with more red/.orange in the mix. Higher numbers like 10,000K indicate a "cooler" light with more blue/purple in the mix. How you light the tank is up to you, unless you have live plants.

If you have plants, you should get a "daylight" or "full spectrum" type of tube. These will have a kelvin rating between 6000K and 7000K. They provide the best plant light, and colour rendition of your fish and plants will be very close to the mid-day sun.

Byron.
Thanks for all of your info! I checked the bulbs...the old bulbs say GLO Sun-Glo 24'/61cm 20W T8, the new say F18W - T8 - AR - F&SA on it. it appears they are the same size... any suggestions what else the problem could be? Thanks!
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post #5 of 5 Old 06-09-2011, 07:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onlinediamond View Post
Thanks for all of your info! I checked the bulbs...the old bulbs say GLO Sun-Glo 24'/61cm 20W T8, the new say F18W - T8 - AR - F&SA on it. it appears they are the same size... any suggestions what else the problem could be? Thanks!
My only thought now is that the fixture is perhaps old enough that there is something with the newer tubes causing problems. I have a related issue on my 33g that has an older (1994) fixture, not a buzz, but it takes several minutes for the newer T8 tubes to light, whereas they are instant (same make tubes) with my new fixtures on the other tanks.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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