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This is a discussion on The lastest... within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Well, that night since my first post, we decided to do a HUGE water change. Taking everyone out and removing more then half of ...

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Old 11-16-2006, 09:54 PM   #1
 
The lastest...

Well, that night since my first post,

we decided to do a HUGE water change. Taking everyone out and removing more then half of the water from my 29gallon tank. Which consisted of 2 plecos, 1 crayfish, 1 platy, 3 bloodfin tetras, 2 med barbs, 2 iridescent sharks and 1 gourami. That night when I posted my ammonia was 2.0 and pH was well over 7.6.

We were desperate hence the big water change.


Today we had two deaths 1 bigger barb and 1 iridescent shark. I tested the water today and ammonia was .5 and pH was 7. Do you think my fish will continue to die off one by one? That one irridsentis still swimming strangely poor thing, I posted about him earlier and will have to check for any replies.
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Old 11-16-2006, 09:57 PM   #2
 
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Hi Julie.

As long as ammonia is detectable, your fish will continue to suffer. 7 is neutral but ammonia is still toxic at this point. The higher the pH, the more toxic the ammonia will be.

Sorry to hear about your fish.
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:03 PM   #3
 
Thanks blue.
So how do I completely remove this from my tank? I was thinking of returning my fish back to the pet store, but am trying every desperate measure before doing that. If my fish are moved into another tank won't they "contaminate" the other tank? TIA
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:08 PM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidword
Thanks blue.
So how do I completely remove this from my tank?
More water changes.
Quote:
I was thinking of returning my fish back to the pet store, but am trying every desperate measure before doing that. If my fish are moved into another tank won't they "contaminate" the other tank? TIA
Ammonia can't contaminate your other tanks. The fish are suffering from ammonia poisoning.

On the contrary, you did have too many fish in a small tank. Not only that, but the crayfish is incompatible with fish. They can attack fish if given the chance.
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:25 PM   #5
 
Blue, I remember distinctly asking a Petco employee if the crayfish would be okay with the fish, I was told it would be fine, in fact that day I got the crayfish I picked up the tetras & platies with my long gone crab. I trusted this guy he has been working at Petco with the fish forever, I have other pets so frequent the store a lot. My fault for not reading up on this beforehand. So pi$$ed.
So, I should return the crayfish, if I want fish.
Don't want the poor fish to suffer. Dang.
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:29 PM   #6
 
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Sorry to hear that but mistakes can be corrected when you learn from them.:)
All I can advise you is just to do a research on the fish you want before buying them.:) You won't have problems this way.:)
Sorry to hear the loss of your fish. Take a look at the bright side. You learn from your mistakes and this allows you to be more prepared in the future.
On the side note, it was a good thing you joined the forums to ask for help before you go through more disasters and wasting cash from unscrupulous pet stores. A lot of people ended up wasting their cash because the lfs employees did nothing to advise on what to do with situations particularly the New Tank Syndrome which is quite common especially with beginners. I learned the hard way when I bought too many fish from the start and so do other people here. All of us do encounter that.

Good luck with the hobby. Hope the problems will be settled soon.:)
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:42 PM   #7
 
Thanks Blue. Yes, are defiantly learning & very happy to have found you all. It's so true what they say, knowledge most certainly is power!

Thanks again.
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Old 11-16-2006, 10:47 PM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidword
Blue, I remember distinctly asking a Petco employee if the crayfish would be okay with the fish, I was told it would be fine.
When I bought my dinosaur bichir they said "A 10 gallon tank? Oh yeah, that'll be fine, no problem at all." Thankfully I then learned just not to listen to them at all, or at least to be very guarded with what information I take as true. Don't be hard on yourself, so long as you're learning you will be a very good fishkeeper and provider for your little ones! :)
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Old 11-17-2006, 12:49 AM   #9
 
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You are not the first to receive misinformation at a pet store. Blue is correct, though, crayfish eat fish, it's part of their diet. If they can catch them, they're food. I would return that right away if you wish to keep fish. Also, the smaller the tank, the easier time the crayfish would have in catching the fish.
I'm sorry to hear about the fish you lost, but I saw one thing specific other than ammonia that would have caused the deaths. You said you removed the fish from the tank while you did the water change. Simply put, don't do that. Moving the fish causes stress. Fish that are already suffering from poor water conditions, add stress to the mix, and it's sure to be deadly. When you perform water changes, you should never have to remove the fish from the tank. Be careful doing such large water changes, also. If the water quality is that severe, too much change at once can cause more harm than good. The fish will go into shock from extreme changes in water quality, especially any difference in pH levels. I wouldn't suggest changing more than 15% - 20% each day, and I would do this EVERY DAY until your water tests clear for ammonia and nitrite levels. When doing the water changes, don't vac the gravel, as you'll only prolong the process of cycling, making conditions worse.
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Old 11-17-2006, 09:49 PM   #10
 
bettababy, loads of great info. We removed the fish because we wanted to siphon out the gravel, figured we would remove more of the bad stuff that way. Sheesh. We suck . Not for nothing but, taking out the fish and not siphoning seems a lot easier.

Thank you.
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