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Input on 55 gallon planted stocking with Bolivian Rams

This is a discussion on Input on 55 gallon planted stocking with Bolivian Rams within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Nilet699 That really does look like a jungle! I like it! Whats your lighting/additives? Thanks all! ^,^ Just keeping it simple ...

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Input on 55 gallon planted stocking with Bolivian Rams
Old 01-08-2013, 06:58 AM   #31
 
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Originally Posted by Nilet699 View Post
That really does look like a jungle! I like it!

Whats your lighting/additives?
Thanks all! ^,^

Just keeping it simple really.. Using the Seachem Flourish once or twice a week, I like to do it twice but I forget =X (just the plain one, not excel) and a dual bulb T5 HO light fixture on from about 11:30 to 9:30. I was worried about the lighting being too bright, but I think the thick cover of floating plants do a really good job of diffusing it. Pretty much no algae growth, a TINY bit on the glass, but it takes about 3 weeks to even notice any speckles again after scraping it all off.
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:58 AM   #32
 
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That is indeed a lovely aquascape, well done. Byron.
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Old 01-09-2013, 09:26 AM   #33
 
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Been toying with the idea of Diamond Tetras in the tank instead of the Harlequins. They're kind of big compared to my other shoaling type fish. Not sure if they're a good idea.]
Anyone see anything wrong with swapping in these guys (Moenkhausia pittieri) instead of one of the other shoaling type fish I had previously chosen for my stock list? (Trigonostigma heteromorpha, Paracheirodon axelrodi, Hemigrammus bleheri) (to go along side the cory cats and Bolivian Ram s).

They're about an inch bigger or so, other than that they seem to fit right in with all the conditions of my tank and requirements of the other fish.

ALSO, I had originally planned on 10 Sterbai Corydoras, would they do fine if I did 5-6 Sterbai, and 5-6 Blackfin Cory (Corydoras leucomelas)? Or should I just stick to one kind.

Thanks again
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:35 AM   #34
 
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Anyone see anything wrong with swapping in these guys (Moenkhausia pittieri) instead of one of the other shoaling type fish I had previously chosen for my stock list? (Trigonostigma heteromorpha, Paracheirodon axelrodi, Hemigrammus bleheri) (to go along side the cory cats and Bolivian Ram s).

They're about an inch bigger or so, other than that they seem to fit right in with all the conditions of my tank and requirements of the other fish.

ALSO, I had originally planned on 10 Sterbai Corydoras, would they do fine if I did 5-6 Sterbai, and 5-6 Blackfin Cory (Corydoras leucomelas)? Or should I just stick to one kind.

Thanks again
I see no issues anywhere here. Starting with the corys, mixing species is fine; I prefer five minimum of each species, though I have fewer with some of mine for various reasons. The more corys together, the better.

On the other fish, the Diamonds would add a bit to the mid-level in the tank. Bolivian Ram are lower level fish, they rarely if ever get higher than the bottom 1/3 of the tank, and they feed off the substrate like corys. Both the cardinal and rummys remain in the lower 1/2 of the water column. The Diamonds and rasbora species here are mid-water fish. Just keep all this in mind as you select species, so you don't end up with a tank of all lower fish and nothing above mid-tank.

You might want to consider some upper-level species. Hatchetfish would be fine in this mix, esp the marble (Carnegiella strigata), a group of no less than 12, preferably 15-20.

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:46 AM   #35
 
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I see no issues anywhere here. Starting with the corys, mixing species is fine; I prefer five minimum of each species, though I have fewer with some of mine for various reasons. The more corys together, the better.

On the other fish, the Diamonds would add a bit to the mid-level in the tank. Bolivian Ram are lower level fish, they rarely if ever get higher than the bottom 1/3 of the tank, and they feed off the substrate like corys. Both the cardinal and rummys remain in the lower 1/2 of the water column. The Diamonds and rasbora species here are mid-water fish. Just keep all this in mind as you select species, so you don't end up with a tank of all lower fish and nothing above mid-tank.

You might want to consider some upper-level species. Hatchetfish would be fine in this mix, esp the marble (Carnegiella strigata), a group of no less than 12, preferably 15-20.

Byron.
Good to hear the Diamonds would fit in okay. I've kind of fallen in love with their "sparklies" . And I figured the cories would be fine, everywhere I read it says as long as their is 5+ of each species they should be content.

The Marble Hatchetfish are pretty neat, I don't really like the plain silver colored ones so I never really put any thought in the Marbled ones. Those are quite pretty. Thanks for the suggestion ^,^.

I definitely like the idea of spreading the levels in the aquarium a bit more. So I'd be likely to nix the Harlequins and Rummys (as neat as their swimming is, to me the Marbles are a bit more interesting to me).

I'm regretting getting the 55 gallon and not the 75. Just a bit more room to play with. There are so many wonderful fish.
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Old 01-09-2013, 12:09 PM   #36
 
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Good to hear the Diamonds would fit in okay. I've kind of fallen in love with their "sparklies" . And I figured the cories would be fine, everywhere I read it says as long as their is 5+ of each species they should be content.

The Marble Hatchetfish are pretty neat, I don't really like the plain silver colored ones so I never really put any thought in the Marbled ones. Those are quite pretty. Thanks for the suggestion ^,^.

I definitely like the idea of spreading the levels in the aquarium a bit more. So I'd be likely to nix the Harlequins and Rummys (as neat as their swimming is, to me the Marbles are a bit more interesting to me).

I'm regretting getting the 55 gallon and not the 75. Just a bit more room to play with. There are so many wonderful fish.
You have space for all these, you know. This is a 55g, and well planted. Just to throw out some numbers, here is what I would do with the species you have named:

Marble Hatchetfish - 15
Diamond Tetra - 7
Harlequin Rasbora - 9 to 12
Cardinal Tetra - 12 to 15
Brilliant Rummy Nose Tetra - 20
Bolivian Ram - one or a bonded pair
Corydoras - 15 or more

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2013, 12:35 PM   #37
 
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You have space for all these, you know. This is a 55g, and well planted. Just to throw out some numbers, here is what I would do with the species you have named:

Marble Hatchetfish - 15
Diamond Tetra - 7
Harlequin Rasbora - 9 to 12
Cardinal Tetra - 12 to 15
Brilliant Rummy Nose Tetra - 20
Bolivian Ram - one or a bonded pair
Corydoras - 15 or more

Byron.
Oh wow, That just felt like so many fish to me. But then again, I suppose most of the fish are very thin/long rather than full body fish. Tiny bioloads. I also did not realize that having a tank well planted helps so much either. I knew helped but I did not not it was a significant amount. That makes me a very happy camper.

Thank you for all your help, it's been both useful and eye opening.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:07 PM   #38
 
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Oh wow, That just felt like so many fish to me. But then again, I suppose most of the fish are very thin/long rather than full body fish. Tiny bioloads. I also did not realize that having a tank well planted helps so much either. I knew helped but I did not not it was a significant amount. That makes me a very happy camper.

Thank you for all your help, it's been both useful and eye opening.
I thought this would be the reaction. And I was serious, not just teasing you on.

One thing we have to learn as aquarists is just what determines the number of fish we can have in a given tank. The bioload is obviously important, and yes, live plants help a lot with this. And so do regular partial water changes. But this is only one aspect.

The species of fish and their behaviours is of paramount importance. This is why I harp so much in threads about compatibility--but true compatibility. Fish that share the same specific requirements such as water parameters, water current from the filter, plants/wood/rock as cover or to break up territories, etc. will manage together better than those that do not. And then we come to numbers and behaviours. Shoaling fish need a group, and the more the better, and this actually helps the bioload because the fish will be less stressed so they will have less of an impact on the biology in the tank. If they are compatible in terms of their behaviours, they will be less stressed and this again impacts the biology. Fish that are forever nipping one another are sending out allomones (from species to species) and pheromones (within a species) that are chemical signals the other fish read and this can stress them further, negatively impacting the biological system.

Heiko Bleher has written about displays he has set up replicating natural biotopes in South America and elsewhere. The numbers of fish he puts in these tanks would astonish most aquarists. But it works, because the fish are truly compatible and are in their natural expected environment.

Byron.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:42 PM   #39
 
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I thought this would be the reaction. And I was serious, not just teasing you on.

One thing we have to learn as aquarists is just what determines the number of fish we can have in a given tank. The bioload is obviously important, and yes, live plants help a lot with this. And so do regular partial water changes. But this is only one aspect.

The species of fish and their behaviours is of paramount importance. This is why I harp so much in threads about compatibility--but true compatibility. Fish that share the same specific requirements such as water parameters, water current from the filter, plants/wood/rock as cover or to break up territories, etc. will manage together better than those that do not. And then we come to numbers and behaviours. Shoaling fish need a group, and the more the better, and this actually helps the bioload because the fish will be less stressed so they will have less of an impact on the biology in the tank. If they are compatible in terms of their behaviours, they will be less stressed and this again impacts the biology. Fish that are forever nipping one another are sending out allomones (from species to species) and pheromones (within a species) that are chemical signals the other fish read and this can stress them further, negatively impacting the biological system.

Heiko Bleher has written about displays he has set up replicating natural biotopes in South America and elsewhere. The numbers of fish he puts in these tanks would astonish most aquarists. But it works, because the fish are truly compatible and are in their natural expected environment.

Byron.
That all makes complete sense actually. And if you take the gist of it, you really can apply to just about any animal. One shouldn't really go against nature. Things end up they way there are in nature for a reason, it works.

I've read bits and pieces of work about the chemical signals of the fish and things of that nature but most articles tend to go a bit over my head without the proper back knowledge. Was great to have a simplistic version of that topic =)
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:37 PM   #40
 
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Acclimating my first group of fish into my QT Tank ^,^

Here's to having a happy and healthy aquarium

Thanks again for everyone who commented and helped. ^,^I will continue to update and post pictures.

Jessica
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