How many gallons/how hard to move
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How many gallons/how hard to move

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How many gallons/how hard to move
Old 08-14-2011, 06:24 PM   #1
 
How many gallons/how hard to move

48"x14.5"x18 tank is how many gallons? The owner says they have 3" of gravel substrate in it too, and we'd be draining it and transporting the fish in buckets with bubblers. Does this sound like a huge pain? I'm getting everything she has for the tank for free, so i mean i'm only out the truck rental from uhaul.

She's moving and doesn't want risk transporting the tank to Texas. there's a 15 year old angel something and a handful of other fish in it, too. Any help would be appreciated since we're thinking of doing this tomorrow!
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:17 PM   #2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genewitch View Post
48"x14.5"x18 tank is how many gallons? The owner says they have 3" of gravel substrate in it too, and we'd be draining it and transporting the fish in buckets with bubblers. Does this sound like a huge pain? I'm getting everything she has for the tank for free, so i mean i'm only out the truck rental from uhaul.

She's moving and doesn't want risk transporting the tank to Texas. there's a 15 year old angel something and a handful of other fish in it, too. Any help would be appreciated since we're thinking of doing this tomorrow!

I am thinking probably either a 50 or 55 gallon tank, have you tried googling the dimensions and seeing what you get? If all glass the tank itself will be about 100 lbs empty. I would remove the gravel from the tank and put it into one or two five gallon buckets. It will be some work but for free I would say it is worth it. Get someone strong to help, I had gotten a 50 gallon in May that was a pita to get into the apartment since I live on the second floor and I had a gal from work helping me move it. We got it in okay although I was sure that thing was going to take me down the stairs Removing the gravel will help to make it more managable to move.
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:26 PM   #3
 
54.233766233766.....it's going to be pretty heavy with that much gravel in it. BUT two grown men in okay shape should be able to move it. So long as you guys are emptying the water completely. Try and transport the fish in buckets using the tanks water, as to not put the fish under anymore stress.Try and keep the buckets out of the son when transporting or waiting to move them. Small bodies of water will heat up rather quickly and be deadly to the fish.

Also, those portable battery powered air pumps wouldn't be a bad idea. I know walmart, petco, and petsmart sell the splitters for tubing. That way you could effectively run 4 or 5 air stones off one pump into each of the separate buckets. You'd be out the cost of a air pump, some 1/8" tubing, few air stones, splitter, and batteries. And having a backup air pump for power outages isn't a bad thing to have laying around anyways. You'd probably be out like $25 for everything.

Here's a drawing of what I'm talking about. Obviously objects aren't drawn to size.
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Old 08-14-2011, 08:57 PM   #4
 
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Don't lift the tank with anything in it! Gravel is really heavy and any torque you accidentally apply to the tank will crack something. An empty 55 is not too bad for two people to move if you are in decent physical condition (watch your backs). You probably have about 100 lbs of gravel to deal with and, I'm guessing, 50-75 lbs of tank?.
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Old 08-14-2011, 09:05 PM   #5
 
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i think i would be worried about the seal after carrying a tank with extra weight in it, i would carry it empty. that goes for both water and/or gravel. i think i would even do this when moving a 10 gallon tank.. it would never hurt.
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Old 08-14-2011, 10:39 PM   #6
 
You NEVER EVER transport a tank with anything in it except AIR!

Before the move, make sure you will place the tank where the structure will hold it! The filled weight of a 55g tank is about 625 lbs. Determine where everything is going to plug in and maybe, just maybe install a GFIC outlet and/or get a power strip?

Siphon off only enough water in one or more 5 gal buckets to contain the fish.
The rest of the water goes down the drain or via a hose out on the lawn. Scoop all of the gravel into one or more 5 gal buckets (not the ones with the fish!) - keep damp.

Rent an appliance dolly to move the EMPTY tank. Pad the bottom and back (cardboard/towels works well), then stand the empty tank up on its side and strap to the dolly to secure. With help, load the tank, dolly and all into the truck or van.
Set-up the tank in it's new home.
Clean and add the gravel (DO NOT CLEAN WITH CHLORINATED WATER!) and conditioned water that is at the appropriate temperature. Install the cleaned filter with new media and the heater and ensure everything is working properly. You will need to acclimate the fish to your water - I like to use a drip method - you should research.


good luck with the tear down, move and setup.
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Old 08-15-2011, 01:17 AM   #7
 
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This tank sounds larger than 55 gallon's according to measurement's posted and I agree that it should be made as light as possible.
I would empty some gravel from the tank into five gallon bucket(s) and would fill the buckets half full of tank water and place the filter material in this bucket as well. Keeping the filter material wet in old tank water will preserve bacteria(good kind) .
Would place fish in another bucket of tank water with battery operated air stone.
If you plan on using the gravel then you will need to place it in bucket's as well.
Would not attempt to move this large a tank with more than an inch of gravel and or water.
Would try and preserve the filter material as mentioned, and a cup or two of the existing substrate (mesh bag) in tank water, to help prevent the need for cycling the aquarium which in my view would need to be done if one cleaned all the gravel as well as the filter and or replaced existing filter media with new.
Hauling old aquarium water is a pain but can be of benefit in cases where fishes have been kept in tanks with less than regular maint.
Fishes will try and adapt to water condition's they find themselves in, even poor condition's (no choice), and sudden changes to water chemistry, even for the better,,, can sometimes affect osmoregulatory function of fishes negatively,, as fishes try and adapt to very different condition's.Some fishes are able to adapt readily, and other's are under considerable stress.
This is also why two or three smaller weekly water changes are desired over one large water change when attempting to improve water condition's and subsequent fishes health on possibly neglected tanks where water changes have not been regularly performed, or where water changes cannot dilute quickly enough the waste being produced in say over stocked tanks and fishes health has deteriorated as a result.
One would think that a large water change for the better would be the way forward, but it often result's in stressed and possibly sick fish who are suddenly ,,rather than gradually introduced to new enviornment.
If the tank's maint has been performed reularly,and water chemistry at new residence is not too far off that which fishes are accustomed to, then saving old aquarium water is a matter of preference.
If one chooses ,,they can simply use drip acclimation from new tank's water into holding bucket's of fishes, and slowly acclimate the fish over an hour or more, to the new water Just like you would from the store. This is always better than simply floating the bag of fish and then turning it loose into the tank or netting fish from a bucket and turning them loose .IMHO

Last edited by 1077; 08-15-2011 at 01:28 AM..
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Old 08-15-2011, 01:43 AM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbH View Post
I am thinking probably either a 50 or 55 gallon tank, have you tried googling the dimensions and seeing what you get? If all glass the tank itself will be about 100 lbs empty. I would remove the gravel from the tank and put it into one or two five gallon buckets. It will be some work but for free I would say it is worth it. Get someone strong to help, I had gotten a 50 gallon in May that was a pita to get into the apartment since I live on the second floor and I had a gal from work helping me move it. We got it in okay although I was sure that thing was going to take me down the stairs Removing the gravel will help to make it more managable to move.


A 55 gallon is not even close to 100lbs empty, just a correction, im only 112 lbs and i carried my 55 gallon empty up 3 flights of stairs alone, its not to hard to do. But I would save the media that they were using, and DO NOT RINSE THE ROCKS, like said before keep them in their own buckets to move, and you want to try and save about 50% or more of the fishes orginal water. Hope this helps a little


And yes carry the tank completly empty
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Old 08-15-2011, 12:09 PM   #9
 
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I agree with others, never lift or carry a tank over 20g that is not completely empty. Depending upon the age and the condition of the seams and how they were made, it is very, very easy to break the seal somewhere and you wouldn't even notice it--until water went in.
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Old 08-15-2011, 12:26 PM   #10
 
okay she has 4 buckets and i am going to go get some today (my buckets have only ever had conditioned water in them and that's not changing today)

2-3 with gravel (she said 3 inches which seems like too much substrate to me, and i have a bunch here that is clean) and water and the filter, and the rest with fish and water. i think the fish should do in 2 buckets, and the rest can be water.

Thanks to you all, very helpful. I'm going to have to do this all again next month when we move, but still, free established tank.
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