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high temps in tanks

This is a discussion on high temps in tanks within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> LOL thanks guys! yea the appartment has *zero* insulation abbeysdad.. not worried about it because i wont be here long and everything else was ...

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Old 05-27-2012, 05:42 PM   #11
 
LOL thanks guys! yea the appartment has *zero* insulation abbeysdad.. not worried about it because i wont be here long and everything else was great.. just an old place.. might get the a/c from the basement i just dont want to pay for more electricity yet... anyway i ended up floating a small double ziploc bag with some ice cubes in it and dropped a degree or 2.. bottles are a good idea.. on a different/cool/interesting note, my 2 jewel cichlids CERTAINLY did not mind the temp.. i was looking at one of my jewels today which i suspected of having bloat.. and suddenly realized that it was no longer hideously fat any more.. and then i realized why she was at the back of the tank and all my barbs were cowering in the corner... a whole mess of eggs on the driftwood! cool but now i either have to vacuum her eggs or quickly find a home for a bunch of angry fish that no one wants.. cool to know for sure that they are male/female and to see them guarding the eggs as i have never seen it before tho :) might start a new thread to see if anyone wants the fry.
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Old 05-27-2012, 05:48 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
Simon,

Lowering the temperature control on your heater is a bad idea. If the tank temperature is higher than the heater set point do to the weather/room temperature, the heater simply does not come on. But now you've set it lower so when the temperature does come down, your tank temperature will now be too low. Opening the lid(s) and/or having a fan blow across the surface are good ideas - fiddling with the heater setting, not so much.

AD
Thanks AD,

I only lowered the temp gauge on the heater to still above the minimum temp range for all the fish I stock. Usually run the tank about 25c, yesterday the tank was around 27 and I dropped the thermostat to around 22-23c although now you have pointed out that it is pointless I have increased it again.

The fish don't seem overly bothered by the weather, I think the odd behaviour I noticed may be some kind of spawning behaviour. Just never noticed it before in the glow lights. The danios I have were definitely doing the same thing the other day, and when I changed the floss filter pads there was eggs stuck to it. must be the weather, or the time of the year maybe? I know nothing about fish reproduction.....

cheers for the advice though
simon
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Old 05-28-2012, 12:29 AM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
Temperature fluctuations frequently cause poor embryo survival, low hatch rates, reduced growth rate, increase in deformities or larval disease, in both blue eyes and rainbows (though I suspect blue eyes to be more sensitive?).
It's estimated that in the wild, larval rainbowfish mortality rates are as high as 99.99%, so I guess you're right and their environment does fluctuate a lot. I know their particular habitats are in general crazy, most fish rarely reach a year past adulthood, but they breed fast and often to make up for this.

Ever gone swimming in a lake at night? It feels extremely warm compared to the air temperature, doesn't it? Shallow water species are probably much more tolerant of changes, as well as fish that live in places where natural flooding/droughts occur, but water in general is a great insulator and holds heat very well.
Both shallow and deep water species have pretty good tolerance for change. If you have ever gone diving in a lake there is always a thermocline somewhere which is a ~10 degree or so temp drop over the course of only a few feet.
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Old 05-28-2012, 06:53 AM   #14
 
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Both shallow and deep water species have pretty good tolerance for change. If you have ever gone diving in a lake there is always a thermocline somewhere which is a ~10 degree or so temp drop over the course of only a few feet.
In those situations, unlike an aquarium, the fish can control the thermal layer of preference. But it's an excellent point because even when ambient temperatures get very high, it doesn't mean that water temperatures are effected very quickly or very deep. As a matter of fact, large bodies of water even temper the ambient air temperature - as evidenced by my neck of the woods - the finger lakes wine region in CNY).
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:07 AM   #15
 
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Very true. I live on lake Ontario. Keeps us cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:10 AM   #16
 
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Very true. I live on lake Ontario. Keeps us cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.
Yeah, but you should keep all the lake effect SNOW <hehe>
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