High nitrite-still breeding? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 03:34 PM Thread Starter
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High nitrite-still breeding?

I live in South Florida, and our water has a rather high concentration of nitrite. My fish shop keeper advised me to start out with 4 gouramis (2 goldens, 2 blues) and wait about 2-4 weeks to cycle it out, along with weekly water changes, bacterial solutions, etc. I'm reaching about a month of cycling yet I am still plagued with about 1.0 ppm. I'm guessing that my tank just needs more time than most; however, the real weird thing is that the male blue's stripes have gotten super dark, almost turning him black. He's made a HUGE bubble nest, and I see him and the female curled in a ball at the top of the tank, presumably breeding? I thought that water parameters had to be PERFECT to simulate proper breeding conditions...or are gouramis just that hardy?
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 03:44 PM
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Well what's your nitrite readings from the tap water you're using? Many of my folks down there have permanent ammonia/ nitrite issues with the tap water, so if you already have it in the tap too, it'll never go down in the tank with doing w/c and adding it in t he tank.
If its coming outta your tap, about the only think you can do is get a conditioner that also works for ammonia/ nitrates, just check the different bottles available at the store and you'll find one.

Yup they're breeding. And yes water parameters are important, but some more then others, eg. if you kept them in superst hard liquid concrete style water, they'd more then likely not breed...

~ Life Is Too Short, Break The Rules, Forgive Quickly, Kiss Slowly, Love Truly, Laugh Uncontrollably And Never Regret Anything that Made You Smile.
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 07:27 PM Thread Starter
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Lol I now have a bunch of teeny tiny eggs. I doubt that they'll even hatch though, and I haven't much interest in trying to help them... Anyways, I just tested the water from my tap, and now I'm confused. The reading is 0.0 ppm...wha?? The water from the tank reads almost the deepest purple. What could possibly be going wrong?
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 07:33 PM
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It takes anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks for a tank to cycle. From your information, I would assume your tank is cycling now, and you are in the nitrite (second) phase. You should do regular (may have to be daily) partial water changes of 50% to keep nitrites below .25. Some fish are more susceptible to ammonia and nitrite that others, but it can do long-term damage that will not be noticeable until later when the fish suddenly dies or develops various ailments due to the weakening by the nitrite poisoning.

Use a good water conditioner. Prime detoxifies ammonia and nitrite so that will help.

I was wondering at first if you actually meant nitrate not nitrite; your mention of "purple" would seem to indicate it is nitrite. Nitrate is far less a problem.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 07:48 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah we're talkin' nitrITE (It took me a while to learn the diff.). I suppose I will just continue with my every other day water changes now that I have confirmed that the source of nitrite is not in fact my tap. I just replaced 3 out of my 20 gallons before this post and destroyed my poor Blue's bubble nest (oops!)

Thanks for the info
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Salacious View Post
Yeah we're talkin' nitrITE (It took me a while to learn the diff.). I suppose I will just continue with my every other day water changes now that I have confirmed that the source of nitrite is not in fact my tap. I just replaced 3 out of my 20 gallons before this post and destroyed my poor Blue's bubble nest (oops!)

Thanks for the info
Well, if the fish live through this they will spawn again and again.

I would change more than 3 gallons of water though; more like half the tank. Siphon it from the top so as not to disturb the substrate where the bacteria are establishing themselves. Use a good water conditioner like Prime that detoxifies ammonia and nitrite. Monitor the nitrite daily (test each morning is my suggestion) and do a pwc if it is high (above .25). After a few days it will start to decrease.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 08:18 PM Thread Starter
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Siphon, ha. I do it the old fashion way. Aka running back and forth from tank to sink with a milk jug :}
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 08:32 PM
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Siphon, ha. I do it the old fashion way. Aka running back and forth from tank to sink with a milk jug :}
Well, you are getting exercise then. The simple water changer units are great for small tanks. With my large ones I need the Python unit that hooks up to the faucet. If I had to carry jugs or even pails of 250+ gallons each week I'd quit the hobby.

B.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-07-2009, 10:16 PM
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Hey be happy your tap reads 0 - That could have become a pain in the *** Like B suggested, your tanks is still cycling so no big deal, just do larger w/c, monitor the readings and/ or the fish (you'll notice if your fish aren't doing well) and soon it will be dealt with.

Another thing that can help it is how much you feed them, try to feed a lil less or only every 2nd day and that'll help it too.

~ Life Is Too Short, Break The Rules, Forgive Quickly, Kiss Slowly, Love Truly, Laugh Uncontrollably And Never Regret Anything that Made You Smile.
Life May Not Be The Party We Hoped For, But While We're Here, We Should Dance. ~
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-13-2009, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Well, just udating my sitch. Thanks to everyone's advice I've been able to get my nitrite reading down to the blue (0.0 ppm) just over the course of this week :] I just came home from the fish store, swapping my gouramis with 6 cardinal tetras, 3 panda corys, and 1 Chinese algae eater. Hoping they adjust well.
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