Help me understand my water parameters - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 12-10-2011, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
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Help me understand my water parameters

I have finally managed to track down what are supposedly the parameters for my locally supplied water.
Unfortunately they are a little incomprehensible and I was hoping someone could help me out with them.
They are as follows:

Mg 8.33 mg/L
Ca 29.7 mg/L
Na 8.52 mg/L
S04 31.2 mg/L
Cl 9.50 mg/L
Total Hardness: 104 mg/L
Total Alkalinity: 76 mg/L
Carbonate Alkalinity: 0 mg/L
Bicarbonate Alkalinity: 76 mg/L
Non-Carbonate Hardness: 28 mg/L
pH in pH units: 7.76

My LFS tells me that the water usually runs at 7.5 for PH, and I know that Detroit (where our water originates) does part of it's purification with Calcium Carbonate.

Any input at all as to making sense of what all these readings mean for my fish would be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 8 Old 12-10-2011, 09:28 PM
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What exactly is it that you are attempting to find out? Whether the water is usable for your freshwater aquarium?
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post #3 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 07:13 AM Thread Starter
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I guess my biggest question is regarding the hardness.
I found Byron's article on the subject, but I wanted to make sure I was understanding correctly.
According to the article a Total Hardness of 104 mg/L means that the reading is 10.4 or Medium Hard.
But, the Non-Carbonate hardness is 28mg/L which is 2.8 which is very soft.

So if I boil my water the Hardness will go down to 2.8?
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post #4 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 10:11 AM
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My understanding is that mg/L is basically the same as ppm so 104mg/l of total hardness would equal 5.8 dgh which is soft water.
Bicarbonate Alkalinity: 76 mg/L would equal 4 KH.

That's my understanding but I could be wrong.

I do know this boiling water will not change the hardness of the water in terms of DGH but it can change the KH of the water which is the buffering power for the
ph. Being it is already low (once again if I am right) there would be no need in doing this as in time the ph is going to drop some anyways.
If Byron sees this thread he can explain it much better and correct me if I am wrong.
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post #5 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 10:57 AM Thread Starter
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According to Byron's article:

" One dGH equals 10 milligrams of calcium or magnesium oxide per litre [2], and is equivalent to 17.848 ppm. Multiplying dGH by 17.9 gives ppm, and similarly dividing ppm by 17.9 gives dGH"

Read more: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...#ixzz1gFJH5HEm

So I think that dividing the mg/L by 10 gives the dGH, which in my case comes out to 10.4 which is smack in the middle of Medium Hard.

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post #6 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre44 View Post
According to Byron's article:

" One dGH equals 10 milligrams of calcium or magnesium oxide per litre [2], and is equivalent to 17.848 ppm. Multiplying dGH by 17.9 gives ppm, and similarly dividing ppm by 17.9 gives dGH"

So I think that dividing the mg/L by 10 gives the dGH, which in my case comes out to 10.4 which is smack in the middle of Medium Hard.

ok
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post #7 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 05:26 PM
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The calculations don't seem to be correct. A GH of 104ppm (= mg/l) would be 5.8 or say 6 dGH. The Alkalinity or bicarbonate hardness (KH) of 76ppm would be 4.2, say 4 dKH.

This is ideal water for most soft water fish. The pH should naturally lower as the aquarium's biology becomes established.

Boiling will not affect GH, but should remove KH. Though another member tried this and the KH and GH rose a bit. One of these days i will try to research this aspect more fully.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 8 Old 12-11-2011, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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So, just as Boredomb said, when discussing the GH mgl/L is equal to ppm, and that number is then divided by 17.9 to get the dGH.
Thank you both very much, it's nice to know that our water is good for fish.
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