Help with gravel. - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 11 Old 04-08-2013, 11:21 PM Thread Starter
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Help with gravel.

I found these small (10-14mm) grey stones at the local hardware. The bag says that they are suitable for ponds etc . Would they be suitable for my aquarium? The shop assistant let me tank a handful home, i washed them and soaked them in white vinegar , they did not bubble or fizz at all . I am now soaking them and will pH test the water when my hubby gets home and tells me where he put the pH test kit .



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post #2 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 12:25 AM
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The pics are not showing up for me on my phone but as long as they don't change the ph I would use them. Also I would let them sit in the water for 24hrs before testing to see if the water changes. That way you have given it some time to change if its going to. You can also check and see if the hardness changes or not. Most of the time both will go up with the right rocks.
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post #3 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 04:15 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Boredomb View Post
The pics are not showing up for me on my phone but as long as they don't change the ph I would use them. Also I would let them sit in the water for 24hrs before testing to see if the water changes. That way you have given it some time to change if its going to. You can also check and see if the hardness changes or not. Most of the time both will go up with the right rocks.
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post #4 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 05:14 AM
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I would think they would be alright as long as you test them out first. Another thing you can do is put them in Vinegar and if they bubble they will cause your Ph in your tank to shift.
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post #5 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 05:39 AM Thread Starter
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There was no bubble or fizz. Stillwaiting to find out pH
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post #6 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 06:39 AM
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I am betting the Ph won't change but still not a bad idea to wait and test it.
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post #7 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 07:28 AM
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They're fine.

All the same grey color. You might want to look at pea stone. Smaller but more variety in colours.

Here's a shot of peas tone in my yard. I haven't tested it but its mostly quartz and I don't see any limestone, which is what can affect your water.

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post #8 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 01:25 PM
I don't like large diameter stones as it's just too easy for uneaten food to get down under and decompose, polluting the water. You would be better served with a small diameter gravel or sand.

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post #9 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 01:43 PM
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I agree the pictured grayish stone is probably safe; I have some larger pieces of this (looks the same anyway) in my 90g river habitat tank. It is commonly referred to as river rock because it comes in various sized rounded smooth stone/rock.

I also agree that this is not a suitable substrate material, if that is what you were thinking. Fine gravel (particle size 1-2 mm) or coarse sand is better, both from the perspective of a biological bed and for live plants if they are intended.

This river rock (if a bit larger pieces) can be very effective in creating a stream or river aquascape, used in small groupings on top of the finer main substrate.

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Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #10 of 11 Old 04-09-2013, 05:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
I don't like large diameter stones as it's just too easy for uneaten food to get down under and decompose, polluting the water. You would be better served with a small diameter gravel or sand.

the decomposing stuff is what you want in a planted tank if that's what she has. makes that natural co2~
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