Help getting driftwood to sink
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Help getting driftwood to sink

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Help getting driftwood to sink
Old 07-17-2011, 06:22 PM   #1
 
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Help getting driftwood to sink

Hey guys,

So I never loved my 29 gallon. I was very happy with it since its my first tank, but It was missing something. WHile at the LFS my gf spotted this nice piece of driftwood (we were looking for wood for my 10 gallon.)

So we got it. The guy said it should sink, but i soaked it in the tub for an hour or so any way. Now I got it in my tank and I love it, but problem is it wont sink. I have rocks holding it down but I dont have a permanant solution. Any ideas??

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Old 07-17-2011, 07:20 PM   #2
 
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So If you could not tell, its Mopani wood. The LFS said it is already "treated" to remove tannin's and "sap" and that it should sink, that's why it was a little on the expensive side. My friend got wood from them not to long ago and had no issues with it.
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Old 07-17-2011, 07:20 PM   #3
 
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At some point it should become waterlogged. Holding down with rock is one method, another is to take a piece of slate, drill a hole, and attach it to the "bottom" side of the wood with a screw, then bury the slate under the substrate. With very large pieces though, this often doesn't work without rocks, as the substrate is not heavy enough to hold it down.

I only use mangrove root/ironwood/malaysian driftwood, whatever you call it; this is very dark brown, almost black. It is heavy even when dry and sinks immediately. It is also not as bad for tannins. And being "hard" it lasts years longer. When wood softens to the point of being squishy, it is rotting and should be removed. I have never yet had a piece of this do that.

Byron.
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:02 PM   #4
 
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Yea I am used to malaysian as well. They said this is presoaked and powerwashed to remove as much as possible.
It gives my tank another dimension, as in the fish now go in between the holes in the wood and it looks alot nicer than them
Just swimming left to right. And my loaches have more hiding spots. And since it is so high my bamboo shrimp will Have another place to fan the water from. So, hopefully I made a good decision.


Hopefully it sinks soon. I just don't want my loaches to knock the Rock off the wood and have it fall onto the substrate. I think I remember you saying you had a fungus problem with this type of wood.
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:58 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigehugedome View Post
Yea I am used to malaysian as well. They said this is presoaked and powerwashed to remove as much as possible.
It gives my tank another dimension, as in the fish now go in between the holes in the wood and it looks alot nicer than them
Just swimming left to right. And my loaches have more hiding spots. And since it is so high my bamboo shrimp will Have another place to fan the water from. So, hopefully I made a good decision.


Hopefully it sinks soon. I just don't want my loaches to knock the Rock off the wood and have it fall onto the substrate. I think I remember you saying you had a fungus problem with this type of wood.
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If it is that African wood, Mopani I think is the name, it is prone to fungus. Not always, but it can be. Keep an eye out for any white fuzz. There are many types of fungus, some are apparently not toxic, but others are deadly.
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Old 07-18-2011, 02:47 PM   #6
 
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Thanks, I will keep an eye out. I hope it stays down on its own, as I want to remove the rocks and replant it. I also hope the bottom becomes water logged because when I do water changes, the top will be exposed to air, and I dont want that to cause it to float again. Once I reattach my java fern, and figure out some type of moss, I think the tank Will be alot nicer.

By the way I did post this in the plant section, and I'm sure whoever helped me was spot on, but while I got you here, maybe I could pick your brain Can a moss ball be somehow attached to wood, or do I need something like java moss. I have not found java moss locally, so when I saw the ball I figured I could try something, but after some research I feel like I bought the wrong thing.
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:01 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigehugedome View Post
Thanks, I will keep an eye out. I hope it stays down on its own, as I want to remove the rocks and replant it. I also hope the bottom becomes water logged because when I do water changes, the top will be exposed to air, and I dont want that to cause it to float again. Once I reattach my java fern, and figure out some type of moss, I think the tank Will be alot nicer.

By the way I did post this in the plant section, and I'm sure whoever helped me was spot on, but while I got you here, maybe I could pick your brain Can a moss ball be somehow attached to wood, or do I need something like java moss. I have not found java moss locally, so when I saw the ball I figured I could try something, but after some research I feel like I bought the wrong thing.
I saw that thread but didn't respond as I don't know, having never tried moss balls. I believe they are actually a form of algae, if memory serves me. That plus their nature would suggest not. I would stick with Java Moss on wood, I am having good growth from JM in all my tanks now, even appearing on wood previously bare. Goes in cycles.
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Old 07-18-2011, 05:55 PM   #8
 
I've seen a few people post with pictures of Moss balls attached to wood and rock like you wanted. IT grows super super super slow, so you might be better off with Java Moss.

The moss balls are algae, I forget the name of it. I also thought I saw a recent article that they might be getting a classification.
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:42 PM   #9
 
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Thanks guys,

I guess im going to the hardware store tomorrow to try and figure out how to attach this wood to slate, as it is still floating. A rock fell over onto the substrate so I don't want to chance that again. What type of screw is tank safe?
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:10 AM   #10
 
I'm thinking you need eithera stainless steel or brass screw to inhibit/prevent rusting.

Instead of slate you could also try a plastic (picnic dinner) plate screwed into the bottom covered with gravel. Back in the day, I re-purposed a flat UGF plate for the same purpose.
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