Help choosing species of Rasbaras and Loaches - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #11 of 37 Old 06-12-2010, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Do you mean Ceratopteris Thalictroides? I've been looking for that plant for a long time, sweet aquatics just recently got it in stock. :)

I may get a Marimo ball instead of java moss- they're from japan, it's not too much of a stretch to call japan southeast asia...
Ceratopteris cornuta is the name I used when entering this in our profiles. C. thalictroides is technically a different species, but you do see all these mis-named from time to time. Go by the appearance, the floating form is stunning, as the photos with our profile show. I bought one plant some 14 years ago and I still have dozens of these plants all descended from that one original.

Java Moss is lovely on bits of wood and rock. Mine arrived probably with some of the wood, and has slowly spread. Another great plant in a SE Asian setup b3ecause the fry and small fish can get into it. I'm sure this is one reason I have so many fry surviving from my sparkling gourami, as I see them (the fry) in the Moss quite a bit.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #12 of 37 Old 06-12-2010, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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I actually have java moss in another tank, so I could move it over I suppose. I know guppy fry love it too.

I found some fish that are breathtaking, but apparently rare.

10 Microrasbora Erythromicron


10 Microrasbora Kubotai


10 Microrasbora rubescens


10 Dwarf Rasbora


12 Dwarf Loaches


1 male or a pair of Sphaerichthys vaillanti (max size 3 inches)
http://www.fischhaus-zepkow.de/Illus..._vaillanti.JPG

Heavily planted, and according to http://www.aqadvisor.com it's 75% stocked. Will probably keep the tank empty for a while- most of these fish are relatively rare. (rare = expensive)

Think that would be a nice setup? All the rasboras are about 1 inch, maybe 1.2 max. Might go for some kind of compatable larger fish... *shrug*
Colorful selection though, right?

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post #13 of 37 Old 06-12-2010, 04:25 PM
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All three species of Chocolate Gourami (genus Sphaerichthys) should (= must as far as I'm concerned) be kept in groups. They are a shoaling fish, and while males will be territorial with each other, they have a very highly developed social structure which is quite impressive to behold. When I got my two species (S. osphromenoides and S. selatanensis) I got three of each because that was all there were; they are almost identical (I included a photo of each species in the profile with the differentiation mentioned), and they have interacted quite well. The S. osphromenoides have spawned several times (I was able to get 1 male and two females of this species) but the other three show no interest yet, so I'm assuming they are all male or female. I have three surviving fry from the various spawnings (I let nature takes its course). The S. vaillanti i have not yet come across; interestingly, the S. selatanensis were labelled as vaillanti, and I told the lady they were not, but as I bought the last three I don't think she cared anyway.

Where do you live that you can get those rare cypriniids? We only got some Boraras brigittae recently, although we did have B. merah earlier (I put these into my 70g and over 7 months they disappeared to just one, and it is now in the 10g with the B. brigittae and seems quite happy). They are so small, they get lost in the 70g, and I suspect may have been pulled into the filter; if fry survive in that tank, so should these.

By the way, Microrasbora erythromicron is no longer in Microrasbora, but has been moved to the genus Danio as it has been determined they are in fact danios and not rasbora; same as the celestial and a couple others. Dr. Tyson Roberts deduced this in 2007, and set up the new genus, but some ichthyologists disagreed, but further scientific study by others has now confirmed Roberts was correct, and the name is now deemed valid as Danio erythromicron. And Microrasbora kubotai is now Microdevario kubotai thanks to Dr. Kottelat who is prob the leading authority on this family. I will be adding profiles of some of these shortly as I have time. Lovely fish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 06-12-2010 at 04:41 PM.
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post #14 of 37 Old 06-13-2010, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Wow, things are always changing. I like it. :)

I was under the assumption that Danios prefer harder (and more basic) water than rasboras and tetras...
Would the fish I mentioned work in a softwater tank? (Ph 5-6, Kh <4)?

My goal for the tank is a southeast asian wetlands/marshl...

(Will likely move my bamboo over to those tanks- they're emersed in my 5 and have easily tripled in size in the last 2 months- from 3 small leaves to 7-8 large ones with a new leaf sprouting every other day. Nice red roots so they're enjoying a soil-substrated aquarium and probably helping a LOT with the ammonia- All nitrogen-based parameters read 0, and apparently there's quite a bit of CO2 being produced by the substrate as proven by the explosive growth and lower Ph, as Diana Walstead claims.)

As far as getting the rare fish- I'm in Alabama (south-southeastern USA). There's not a single Fish club or mom&pop LFS in miles and miles. I'm going to rely on the internet.

I'm in the process of finding small online fish companies- For example, I will NOT be shopping at thatfishplace- way overpriced because like normal pet chains, you're paying extra for the media empire. ($18 for a dwarf loach?! No way.)

I've found a couple small businesses, and I know a couple people who regularly import wild-caught fish for group purchases... (MzJinxd for one, who apparently used to post here in the shrimp forum before she left. Franksfish.com is another source I plan on contacting when I'm ready. Of course Aquabid as well- I might get lucky.)

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Last edited by redchigh; 06-13-2010 at 04:53 PM.
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post #15 of 37 Old 06-13-2010, 06:47 PM
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Most of the rasborin are fine in soft acidic water. I believe of those you mention only Danio erythromicron requires alkaline water; I have yet to add this profile, but one source I just checked indicates it does not fare well in acidic water, as it comes from Lake Inle which is in a karstic valley and this means alkaline soils. Adding dolomite or crushed coral to up the hardness and pH seems necessary for this species. But the Boraras are fine in soft, acidic water, they come peat swamps as noted in the profile of Boraras brigittae.

Being in the US you have access to several online fish suppliers. Being in Canada, this creates difficulties for me, as there is customs (not that much if the permits from US Agriculture are OK) and more importantly the airport. I would have to drive to the airport, then there can be flight delays or early arrivals, lost parcels...any number of problems. I prefer leaving that to the pros who are used to it and have it generally worked out. Though sometimes they do lose whole shipments of fish through all this. I'd hate to spend a couple hundred dollars on a fish order only to have them arrive dead, with no recourse to the sender.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #16 of 37 Old 06-13-2010, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
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Well if I find a good place online that guarantees live arrival and ships to canada I'll be sure to let you know.

I know aquabid has canada listings from time to time, like there's one guy that if i remember right is in vancouver, and sells RCS.
I've also heard that a few places with a large enough order will pay a courier to deliver it across the border in person to prevent delays....

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post #17 of 37 Old 06-14-2010, 01:12 PM
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Well if I find a good place online that guarantees live arrival and ships to canada I'll be sure to let you know.

I know aquabid has canada listings from time to time, like there's one guy that if i remember right is in vancouver, and sells RCS.
I've also heard that a few places with a large enough order will pay a courier to deliver it across the border in person to prevent delays....
The Vancouver fellow is probably Charles at Canadian Aquatics. I buy from him regularly; he's great and his fish are top quality, direct from his exporters in SA. And there are a couple stores that mainly have wild-caught fish direct from SA or Asia. But for obvious reasons all of these have limited species because they have to sell them. "Specialist" fish that only a few of us want are usually more expensive and only we buy them, so one has to understand the business aspect.

There are places in the US that will ship to Canada, but as I said the problem is mainly the airport. I just can't afford to risk that.

I must have a look at Aquabid.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #18 of 37 Old 06-15-2010, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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I was looking online, and found a good deal on some green tiger barbs. They're from southeast asia and like acidic water...

Would they eat microrasboras.... That is the question....Quite beautiful and available locally...
BTW, I can't resist....

Sorry if I'm wasting Tropical Fishkeeping's bandwidth. :p

I'm beginning to cheer up, since a local LFS can order:
Brilliant rasbora - Rasbora borapetensis
Emerald Eye Rasbora RASBORA DORSIOCELLATA DORSIOCELLATA
Scissortail Rasbora RASBORA TRILINEATA
Green Tiger Barb PUNTIUS TETRAZONA (too big?)
Black Ruby - Barbus Nigrofasciatus (too big?)
Odessa Barb - PUNTIUS PADAMYA (beginning to see a pattern here?)
Tinfoil Barb - BARBUS SCHWANEFELDI (Forget I even mentioned this one. max size 13 inches... lol.)
Red Honey Dwarf Gourami COLISA SOTA "GOLD" (Assuming Colista Chuna "gold")
Croaking Gourami - TRICHOPSIS PUMILUS

I still want that samurai gourami though... Looks awesome. Not sure what I'm going to do, but might buy most of the shoaling fish at the LFS and hold out for the high-price stuff online...

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post #19 of 37 Old 06-15-2010, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
I was looking online, and found a good deal on some green tiger barbs. They're from southeast asia and like acidic water...

Would they eat microrasboras.... That is the question....Quite beautiful and available locally...
BTW, I can't resist....

Sorry if I'm wasting Tropical Fishkeeping's bandwidth. :p

I'm beginning to cheer up, since a local LFS can order:
Brilliant rasbora - Rasbora borapetensis
Emerald Eye Rasbora RASBORA DORSIOCELLATA DORSIOCELLATA
Scissortail Rasbora RASBORA TRILINEATA
Green Tiger Barb PUNTIUS TETRAZONA (too big?)
Black Ruby - Barbus Nigrofasciatus (too big?)
Odessa Barb - PUNTIUS PADAMYA (beginning to see a pattern here?)
Tinfoil Barb - BARBUS SCHWANEFELDI (Forget I even mentioned this one. max size 13 inches... lol.)
Red Honey Dwarf Gourami COLISA SOTA "GOLD" (Assuming Colista Chuna "gold")
Croaking Gourami - TRICHOPSIS PUMILUS

I still want that samurai gourami though... Looks awesome. Not sure what I'm going to do, but might buy most of the shoaling fish at the LFS and hold out for the high-price stuff online...
This barb is actually the Tiger Barb; breeders have for quite a while been producing variants from selective breeding (not dyeing in this case) and there are several. Co-incidentally, I just updated the Tiger Barb profile yesterday, and mentioned this. You might want to check it out. I'm afraid you will see that all these "variants" are as risky as the original and not community fish as we tend to think of them. I would not mix any of the TB variants with smaller fish. The species name is incorrect too (can't win can you), as I explain in the profile.

Never been much on barbs because their active boisterous nature makes it difficult to keep other sedate fish, and in my Asian setups I have very sedate fish. I have a group of the Emerald Eye Rasbora, quite nice fish, in a dim light the blue eye really shines; this species (genus actually) name has changed too--it is now Brevibora dorsiocellata. In only 2009 a major study by T.Y.Liao and others appeared, and many of the "Rasbora" species pretty much got shifted elsewhere. This followed upon earlier suggestions by Kottelat and Roberts and others, so it is no surprise. The Rasbora/Danio/Barb fish in the cyprinids are undergoing extensive research and phylogenetic study and have for the last decade. These genera have been quite a catch-all in some respects.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #20 of 37 Old 06-15-2010, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
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I was just copy and pasting from the LFS's supplier, definately don't expect them to be accurate. I was hoping that in a group of 6-8 they might not be too agressive, I was just wondering if they would devour the little rasboras.

I guess they would. I got some books, I'll look a few up and see what tickles my fancy. :)

What about the two under the green tiger barb in the list- would they be better?
ie. is it a tiger barb thing or just a larger sized barb thing..

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