HELP! Advice Needed! Cloudy Water in established tank - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 03:12 PM Thread Starter
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HELP! Advice Needed! Cloudy Water in established tank

Hi people! Hope somebody can help!

I have recently upgraded my tank to a larger 46 litre (originally had a 23 litre).
I set up the new tank, put the bacteria in and left in for a week or so.

I then added 3 fish that i had in my old 23 litre (3 neons) and everything went ok - the water went a little cloudy due to the cycle but it sorted itself out and was clear again after a day.

I have left the tank for a week and then proceeded to add 4 more neons and 4 red wag platys.

However the tank has gone cloudy again (been like it for a couple of days) The fish seem to be ok, and not too distressed. Is this another bacteria bloom due to the added fish? What is the best way to solve it? Let it ride out with water changes? Add any chemicals/bacteria?

The tank looks cool, the fish look great - i just need to get the water sorted! I have been keeping fish for a year or so, but still got a lot to learn!
Any info/suggestions would be gratefully received!
Many thanks in advance!
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 03:43 PM
You probably added fish too soon. It's likely it's a mini-cycle/another bloom due. Don't add any new fish, and pay attention to ammonia and nitrates/nitrites. Do you have any plants in this tank..live ones?
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 04:25 PM
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I agree it is most likely a bacterial bloom caused by the sudden increase in organics. But it may not be part of a nitrification cycle problem. Test your ammonia and nitrite and if either are above zero, take remedial action. Partial water change using a conditioner than detoxifies ammonia/nitrite (whichever) such as Prime or Ultimate.

If you have live plants, there should be no ammonia/nitrite issue regardless. But again, the cloudiness is not necessarily related to this, and a normal bacterial bloom is normally harmless to fish. If this is what it is, it will clear best if left alone. The water changes are only to deal with a rise in ammonia or nitrite.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 04:36 PM Thread Starter
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Hey guys, thanks for the advice! Hopefully it is just another mini bloom! I will test the water.
I do not have any plants in there at the moment (but currently considering getting some!)

I wont add any more fish and hopefully it will clear up!
I know blooms can sometimes take up to a couple of weeks to clear up, but if there is no change i will post again.

Many thanks again!
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post #5 of 8 Old 07-10-2012, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Beltinbay View Post
Hey guys, thanks for the advice! Hopefully it is just another mini bloom! I will test the water.
I do not have any plants in there at the moment (but currently considering getting some!)

I wont add any more fish and hopefully it will clear up!
I know blooms can sometimes take up to a couple of weeks to clear up, but if there is no change i will post again.

Many thanks again!
You should definitely think about getting some plants. It never hurts and only helps a tank to have some foliage.
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post #6 of 8 Old 07-11-2012, 09:01 AM
A tank is not considered 'established' until it hits the 6 month mark.
A lot happens in the first few months as a new micro bio-climate is established.

A Byron mentions, it is a common misconception that cloudy water is relative to the N2 cycle. It is not. Cloudy water is the result of a bacteria bloom of facultative (decomposition) bacteria. These are the critters that break down and decompose waste (organic compounds) products. Some are confused thinking that there new tank does not have organics in the water....but it's often in there in all but the most finely filtered waters.

Although cloudy water might be blamed on adding fish, the most frequent cause is over feeding. Even if/when all food is consumed, fish will over eat and produce more waste. If all food is not consumed, or the substrate allows uneaten food to quickly sink out of reach, excess decaying organic material may cause a bacterial bloom of facultative bacteria.

Although unsightly and not desirable in a display tank, cloudy water is rarely harmful to fish. However, it can underscore a situation that may become a bigger problem. Excess decaying organic matter produces [more] ammonia, nitrites and eventually nitrates which can all become harmful. Obviously in a tank that hasn't cycled this can be very dangerous.

Usually cloudy water resolves in a few days assuming good tank housekeeping is in play.

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post #7 of 8 Old 07-11-2012, 09:24 AM
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Since the new tank is an upgrade of an existing tank, it could very easily be established well before 6 months. Of course that is predicated on the previous tank being established, and not botching the upgrade.

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post #8 of 8 Old 07-11-2012, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by jaysee View Post
Since the new tank is an upgrade of an existing tank, it could very easily be established well before 6 months. Of course that is predicated on the previous tank being established, and not botching the upgrade.
I have recently upgraded my tank to a larger 46 litre (originally had a 23 litre).
I set up the new tank, put the bacteria in and left in for a week or so.


Just didn't sound very established to me.

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