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This is a discussion on Having trouble getting started within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Byron Found it. This is their blurb on this product: EASYSTART contains highly active bacteria cultures which will quickly give aquariums ...

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Having trouble getting started
Old 04-04-2012, 09:24 PM   #21
 
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Found it. This is their blurb on this product:
EASYSTART contains highly active bacteria cultures which will quickly give aquariums and filters a boost. The unique bacteria carrier ensures an accelerated increase in useful bacteria, helping to combat the actions of harmful bacteria as well as cleaning the water of heavy metals and other chemical pollutants. The result is a healthy aquarium with lively and brightly coloured fish.
That bothers me, the bit about "cleaning the water of heavy metals and other chemical pollutants." I never like using what I don't understand. And the bit about combating the actions of harmful bacteria--I don't like messing with bacteria and nature. There is a complex bacteria process occurring in a healthy aquarium, it should be left alone to do its job. At the risk of overwhelming you with reading, here's an article on that:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/

Biological supplements that are 100% live bacteria are useful, and I recomend them in certain cases. Tetra's SafeStart and Seachem's Stability are two I know, there are a couple others now. These have no chemicals, they just seed the tank with bacteria. That's a very different kettle of fish.
I read the article on bacteria over the week end, very informative.
My plan is to get the tank up and going and then do my weekly wc's. Try not to use chemicals unless I have too. Im not a chemist nor do I want to be one.
Right now Im just thrilled that the tank is finally cooking. Its been a couple months since I set it up and we're looking forward to slowly loading it with fish.

You mentioned you were writing something about wc's. I'd like to know the right way to do them. One of my concerns is refilling. What is the correct procedure to refill?
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:50 AM   #22
 
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I read the article on bacteria over the week end, very informative.
My plan is to get the tank up and going and then do my weekly wc's. Try not to use chemicals unless I have too. Im not a chemist nor do I want to be one.
Right now Im just thrilled that the tank is finally cooking. Its been a couple months since I set it up and we're looking forward to slowly loading it with fish.

You mentioned you were writing something about wc's. I'd like to know the right way to do them. One of my concerns is refilling. What is the correct procedure to refill?
For small tanks a bucket and water changing siphon is adequate. For larger tanks it is more practical to use a "Python" system that connects to a faucet.
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:11 PM   #23
 
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For small tanks a bucket and water changing siphon is adequate. For larger tanks it is more practical to use a "Python" system that connects to a faucet.
Use a Python for larger tanks, Is that the correct way? Thats the way most of us do it but we're pumping in chlorinated water directly in the tank while filters are running and the chlorinated water ends up killing bacteria. Of course we use a chlorine remover like Prime. If its added prior to refilling, should it be allowed to circulate before refilling and how long does it take to actually neutralize the chlorine?
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:22 AM   #24
 
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Use a Python for larger tanks, Is that the correct way? Thats the way most of us do it but we're pumping in chlorinated water directly in the tank while filters are running and the chlorinated water ends up killing bacteria. Of course we use a chlorine remover like Prime. If its added prior to refilling, should it be allowed to circulate before refilling and how long does it take to actually neutralize the chlorine?
I never run filters and heaters during a water change, they should all be shut off until the tank is refilled.

When I'm ready to refill, I adjust the water temp at the faucet (while the tank is still draining, I take a small container of tank water with me and do it by hand, usually just a tad cooler as this replicates a tropical rain which stimulates the fish--Wednesday I actually had Hyphessobrycon bentosi spawning back under the plants as the fresh water was coming in), then turn the valve and start the fill. I go back into the fishroom and squirt conditioner into the tank in front of the Python. I don't measure, I have worked it out that the squirt is about 2 teaspoons, so I squirt roughly according to volume being added.

Water conditioners work instantly, and I mean instantly. In 15+ years of using a Python like this I have never had a problem--except once when I forgot the conditioner.
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Old 04-06-2012, 02:27 PM   #25
 
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I never run filters and heaters during a water change, they should all be shut off until the tank is refilled.

When I'm ready to refill, I adjust the water temp at the faucet (while the tank is still draining, I take a small container of tank water with me and do it by hand, usually just a tad cooler as this replicates a tropical rain which stimulates the fish--Wednesday I actually had Hyphessobrycon bentosi spawning back under the plants as the fresh water was coming in), then turn the valve and start the fill. I go back into the fishroom and squirt conditioner into the tank in front of the Python. I don't measure, I have worked it out that the squirt is about 2 teaspoons, so I squirt roughly according to volume being added.

Water conditioners work instantly, and I mean instantly. In 15+ years of using a Python like this I have never had a problem--except once when I forgot the conditioner.
I made the mistake one time after I did a 50% w/c and realized I had no conditioner. It was 10pm and not even Walmart was open. I woke up to 50% less inhabitants.

Ive used the Python yrs ago when I had tanks, now Im just getting back into the hobby. I've always wondered as I was refilling if I should do my refilling with water that has been left in buckets overnight with conditioner.

Ok, another question, Regardless of the percentage of my wc's, I've always used enough water conditioner for the entire tank. Is that being wasteful or not? Is that doing more harm than good?
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Old 04-06-2012, 02:59 PM   #26
 
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Ok, another question, Regardless of the percentage of my wc's, I've always used enough water conditioner for the entire tank. Is that being wasteful or not? Is that doing more harm than good?
There is differing opinion on the amount needed, some say it should be measured according to the total tank volume (when filling directly from tap to tank), others only for the amount being added. I am among the latter, and when I was measuring (with a teaspoon) I used only the amount for the new water. I normally use a smaller bottle that has a nozzle, so i just squirt, and having measured this I find that a normal squirt is about two teaspoons. So I'm using roughly the amount for the added water but likely a bit more.

I see no point in recklessly wasting expensive conditioner. As for harm, they all say overdosing causes no harm, but this stuff is chemical and there has to be a point at which it may harm. Some types also provide some form of slime coat replenishment, and many of us would prefer not going overboard on this. And at least some basic dechlorinators result in ammonia as a byproduct of the chemical reaction to neutralize chlorine/chloramine. In acidic water this is harmless, but in basic, less so.

Stress is a major issue for fish, as more and more of us are realizing. Adding any chemical to the water is causing stress. Doing a water change involves some stress. Compounding the stress by dumping in more chemicals that necessary doesn't make any sense to me.
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Old 04-06-2012, 06:52 PM   #27
 
I also have fluoride in my city water as well. Do I need to be concerned about this as well?
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Old 04-06-2012, 07:09 PM   #28
 
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I also have fluoride in my city water as well. Do I need to be concerned about this as well?
No, at least, I have never read of issues with fish, and many places put fluoride in the water. It is harmful to humans at high levels but I would assume the water people don't add this much to municipal water.
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