Green algae problem - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-08-2009, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
Joe
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Green algae problem

Ok so I have a 3 gal betta tank set up in my work cubicle. The tank has been running for several months now. A few months ago I had started a thread about a brown algae problem I was having. Well some green algae started to grow as well and I decided to pick up a snail at petsmart. The snail cleaned house on the brown algae but will not touch the green stuff. Now the green algae has taken over the tank coating everything. There is a solid coat of green on the sides, fake plant, fake stone bridge, and all over the rock floor. I spent an hour the other day getting the sides with an algae brush and rinsing off the decorations so it looked decent. I stirred the rocks to kick up algae into the filter but didn't want to wash the rocks and ruin the cycle. Anyway, I covered the tank so it was pitch black over the 4 day thanksgiving weekend and came back to see the algae making its way back up the walls so the "black out" didn't do anything. This tank also never sees natural light and only gets indirect fluorescent light from the office. Anything else I can do to get rid of this next to trying chemicals? It's too small for algae fish I assume and I don't trust the betta with one anyway.
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post #2 of 7 Old 12-08-2009, 05:29 PM
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Live plants should out-compete the algae for the available light and nutrients. There are a number of plants that should manage to live and grow under low light, such as Java Fern, Java Moss, Anubias. If the tank received some daylight from the window(s) you could add a few other species to this list, but depending upon the brightness of the room lights it might not be sufficient to try other plants. Faster growing plants (which obviously require the more intense light) are better at using nutrients before algae.

The common small snails like pond, bladder or Malaysian livebearer will eat algae but probably not in sufficient quantity to keep it down given the ideal environment it now has--nutrients and light with no competition. The weekend blackout may not have been sufficient to stifle the algae, and again with no competition it is primed for take-off.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 7 Old 12-08-2009, 06:15 PM
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I'd add some fast growing stem plants in this tank, them plants consuming the excess nutrition in your tank will not leave enough over for the algae to thrive.
Also important is how often & how much you do water exchanges and how much/ how often you feed, this can also drive the algae growth up / down.

~ Life Is Too Short, Break The Rules, Forgive Quickly, Kiss Slowly, Love Truly, Laugh Uncontrollably And Never Regret Anything that Made You Smile.
Life May Not Be The Party We Hoped For, But While We're Here, We Should Dance. ~
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post #4 of 7 Old 12-08-2009, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel079 View Post
I'd add some fast growing stem plants in this tank, them plants consuming the excess nutrition in your tank will not leave enough over for the algae to thrive.
Also important is how often & how much you do water exchanges and how much/ how often you feed, this can also drive the algae growth up / down.
+1 do w/c and throw in maybe like (1) java fern since its such a small tank the plant coupled with w/c will help with the algae.
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post #5 of 7 Old 12-09-2009, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
Joe
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cool, I'll try all these things. It's amazing that my 46gal tank is easier to maintain then my 3gal at work lol, aside from the 5 gal buckets of water for changes.
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-09-2009, 07:05 PM
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But that's how it is, the bigger the tank the easier or 'more forgiving' it is. That's why newbie's & 2-5g Tanks don't work IMO and should start with a bigger tank.

~ Life Is Too Short, Break The Rules, Forgive Quickly, Kiss Slowly, Love Truly, Laugh Uncontrollably And Never Regret Anything that Made You Smile.
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post #7 of 7 Old 12-09-2009, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel079 View Post
But that's how it is, the bigger the tank the easier or 'more forgiving' it is. That's why newbie's & 2-5g Tanks don't work IMO and should start with a bigger tank.
+1
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