Gravel raising pH? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 15 Old 08-15-2012, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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Is the sand dark enough to bring out the colors in the fish? Also, how much should I buy for a 46 gallon tank?

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post #12 of 15 Old 08-15-2012, 11:38 AM
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Is the sand dark enough to bring out the colors in the fish? Also, how much should I buy for a 46 gallon tank?
Yes. And one bag (which is 50 pounds or 25kg) will be sufficient, for a few dollars.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #13 of 15 Old 08-15-2012, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
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Approximately how deep would the sand be if I used that amount? Would it be deep enough for swordplants and crypts?

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post #14 of 15 Old 08-16-2012, 11:18 AM
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Approximately how deep would the sand be if I used that amount? Would it be deep enough for swordplants and crypts?
You won't need all the bag, but playsand only comes in these bags. But having some extra for later, or another tank is always nice.

I don't have more than 2 inches depth overall (level when first added). Then you can build up deeper areas (3 inches max) in the back for the larger swords. Rocks that are inert are best for this as they are less likely to shift, though in time all substrates will even out unless there is an underlying structure (I've never bothered with this).

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 15 Old 08-16-2012, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the advice Byron! I will probably get around to changing the substrate sometime next week.

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