Getting rid of cholrine?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Getting rid of cholrine?

Getting rid of cholrine?

This is a discussion on Getting rid of cholrine? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> For those who do water changes using tap water what method do you use to get rid of cholrine? Sorry I know another question ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Bleeding Heart Tetra
Bleeding Heart Tetra
Oto Catfish
Oto Catfish
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Getting rid of cholrine?
Old 03-29-2011, 03:30 AM   #1
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Getting rid of cholrine?

For those who do water changes using tap water what method do you use to get rid of cholrine? Sorry I know another question LoL was just wondering? I know that you can get drops to add to the water that gets rid of cholrine just didn't know if there was another option with tap water or not? And it would cost me too much to buy treated water be it RO or distilled soo don't really wanna do that besidtes I don't even know where to get RO water other then where I work and they arent going to let me have it LoL
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 07:55 AM   #2
 
SeaHorse's Avatar
 
Hi Boredomb, I use a Python hose for my water changes,( JIC ..hooks direct to the tap and pulls water out and after adjusting the nozzle, checking temp too, flows new water into the tank, $30-$50) so I put my measured De-chlorinator product like Priime, (I use the LFS brand) straight into the tank and then bring the flow of new water back into the tank. (Worth every penny!)
Now I was talking to the LFS guy and he says Prime while more expensive is incredibly concentrated. One cap per 50 gallons, (read side to confrim) so you could get a much smaller bottle and it will last longer thus saving money. Anybody else agree, or use Prime and can add to this?
SeaHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 11:37 AM   #3
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Using a good water conditioner is wise, unless you have your own water source (such as well or lake) and know exactly what is in it. For those of us on municipal water in North America, chlorine is I think added everywhere, and many now use chloramine as well. Chloramine is ammonia-related, and releases chlorine over time [see below for the reason this is used]. There may be other stuff in tap water too, like heavy metals, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, toxins, and so on. This is public ionfo, so your water supply people can tell you what is in the water; many have websites with posted data.

To your initial question on chlorine. Chlorine alone can be dissipated out of water by letting it stand 24 hours, or by brisk agitation. Chloramine however cannot--this is why many water supplies now use chloramine. It can only be removed by a good water conditioner that specifically targets chloramine.

Some water conditioners will also contain substances to alleviate stress on fish due to water parameter variations, aiding the slime coat, etc.

Another risk with municipal water is that the stuff in it can change. There may be advance notice or sometimes not. I have experienced fish losses due to this, so I know first-hand it can occur.

To Jackiebabie's question, my advice is to follow the recommended dose for the conditioner you use, whatever it may be. While many say there is not harm in overuse, it doesn't make much sense to dump more chemicals in a fish tank than what is actually needed, plus it wastes money. Buying the largest size available is less expensive in the long-run, as the price per volume is always cheaper. I buy the 2 litre jug for both my conditioner and Flourish for this reason. I fill a small conditioner bottle and use it during water changes because it is more convenient and it has a "squirter" top and having measured one "squirt" I can just use a squirt or two depending upon tank volume.

Conditioners vary in price. But all will be less expensive long-term than buying bottled water, RO water, whatever. And they (conditioners) work instantly. Select one that handles what you need for your tap water. My tap water only has chlorine, so I choose a conditioner that detoxifies chlorine/chloramine [most do both]. I have no need for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, etc. detoxification.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 03-29-2011 at 11:42 AM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 12:16 PM   #4
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Okay thanks Byron. I can't find any recent report on the water here the report is from 2009 . Well atleast on the water companys website I could call them but I know they use cholrine here we have to check the amount of it at work for the city water coming in also the report showed some heavy metals like lead and copper didn't show anything about chloramine but you said most conditioners will treat for both Soo will go to the LPS and pick some up
Posted via Mobile Device
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 12:29 PM   #5
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Just to add to that there is also a trace of ammonia nitrite and nitrate in my tap water according to the report. Do I need to get conditioner to hand those issues as well? I know the plants can handle some of those to a point. As long as it not too high right?
Posted via Mobile Device
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 12:32 PM   #6
 
iamgray's Avatar
 
To add to the reference to conditioner overuse from Byron's post, I have read a few sources that say that if there is enough chlorine present in your water that you can smell it, you should use double the dose of what the container says.

Can anyone (looking at you, Byron ) support or refute this notion?
iamgray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 01:12 PM   #7
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Don't know about that but I just read prime says if u have high amounts of chloramine a double dose maybe used safely
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 01:48 PM   #8
 
Byron's Avatar
 
You know, I probably over-dose without even thinking about it. I just "squirt" the stuff, one squirt for small tanks, 2 for larger; I've never had problems with not ridding the chlorine--and my water is very heavy with chlorine some days, you can easily smell it when the tap is turned on. It's just that some think they need to dose for the whole tank, but this is not necessary; sufficient for the volume of water being added works.

Boredomb, if the ammonia/nitrite/nitrate in tap water is significant, it is advisable to use a conditioner that will handle this. Several detoxify ammonia, but to my knowledge only Prime and Ultimate handle nitrite too, and only Prime handles nitrate as well. But here, note I say "significant." Use your test kits, and see what your readings are. Personally I would ignore low readings like .2 of ammonia or nitrite, since the plants and bacteria can easily handle this.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 02:01 PM   #9
 
Boredomb's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Boredomb, if the ammonia/nitrite/nitrate in tap water is significant, it is advisable to use a conditioner that will handle this. Several detoxify ammonia, but to my knowledge only Prime and Ultimate handle nitrite too, and only Prime handles nitrate as well. But here, note I say "significant." Use your test kits, and see what your readings are. Personally I would ignore low readings like .2 of ammonia or nitrite, since the plants and bacteria can easily handle this.

Byron.
Okay thanks again I will check into that some tomorrow and see what the lvls actually are coming out of my tap for sure
Boredomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:47 AM.