Fungus! - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 07:46 PM
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I also had read it was normal and harmless and that a Mystery snail would take care of it. I have that African Mopai wood (not spelled right) :) and I got a snail, and it never came back, and if it does he continues to take care of it, and there was no harm whatsoever to my fish.

That's my experience.

Gwen

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post #12 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 07:49 PM Thread Starter
I planned on spawning egg layers in there... plus already have snails

38 gallon :
Pelvicachromis Taeniatus Nigerian Red not yet breeding pair
4 Pangio Kuhli
12 Hemmigrammus Bleheri
2 Botia Lohachata
1 Botia Straita
1 Ancistrus Sp.
6 Poecilia Reticulata




The Wet Spot Portland Oregon!!!!!!

ADA: Do!aqua Iwagumi 10 gallon size!
7 Clown Killies
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post #13 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 07:51 PM
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There are many types of "fungus" and I can assure you all that some of them are deadly. I did not imagine what happened in my tank, solely from white fungus that appeared on a new piece of Mopani Wood after about 2-3 days. Nor did the other aquarist I met in a local fish store who had the same issue and his corys all died within a few days of fungus appearing on a new piece of Mopani driftwood. Plus Dawn has had similar experiences. This is not made up stuff folks.

Fungus that appears on a bit of uneaten flake food is another matter entirely. As is fungus that appears on open wounds on a fish or other aquatic vertebrate. I am not a microbiologist so I don't know how many types of fungus there may be. Some may be safe, some clearly are not. Dawn may be able to offer us more on this. But please do not write this off as some sort of make-believe. There is a definite and real danger with some types of fungus, and it kills fish.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 05-16-2011 at 07:54 PM.
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post #14 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
yes and i will take it out as soon as possible although my killies don't seem to bothered by it

38 gallon :
Pelvicachromis Taeniatus Nigerian Red not yet breeding pair
4 Pangio Kuhli
12 Hemmigrammus Bleheri
2 Botia Lohachata
1 Botia Straita
1 Ancistrus Sp.
6 Poecilia Reticulata




The Wet Spot Portland Oregon!!!!!!

ADA: Do!aqua Iwagumi 10 gallon size!
7 Clown Killies
7 Ghost shrimp
Christople is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 09:45 PM
well i didnt mean to make it sound like something to just ignore, but experience-wise, my wood fungus has never been an issue for me, never lasts for more than a couple of days. However, mine never presented itself as a "fog" mine was always kinda like black beard algae but white and always in small patches, never in large masses.

One thing that i just noticed was that christople said he boiled it for "10 hours" which is a extraordinary amount of time to boil anything. Even for things like wood, boiling for that amount may have softened up the wood making it prone to rot, which would explain the fungus. I would pull up the wood and see if the fungal areas are soft. If it is, then the wood is rotting and is no longer aquarium safe.
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post #16 of 18 Old 05-17-2011, 03:08 AM
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I have had similar expieriences with mold or fungi on wood before despite boiling,rinsing.
Can't say I could contribute it to fish death's (too many other variables in my view), but if it is a concern,, remove it.
Will say that Mopani wood seems more prone to produce this fungi as opposed to Malaysian wood.
In the past when I expierienced this mold or fungi, I simply removed the wood,gave it a good scrub,and returned it to the tank.Trumpet snails seem to love the stuff.
Always a good idea to soak wood in a container for a week or more, and then boil it before introducing it to the aquarium.Works for me and I have nearly thirty pieces of wood in tanks both at my house and sister's aquarium's as well.(Doubtful that sister will give them back)

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #17 of 18 Old 05-17-2011, 03:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
There are many types of "fungus" and I can assure you all that some of them are deadly. I did not imagine what happened in my tank, solely from white fungus that appeared on a new piece of Mopani Wood after about 2-3 days. Nor did the other aquarist I met in a local fish store who had the same issue and his corys all died within a few days of fungus appearing on a new piece of Mopani driftwood. Plus Dawn has had similar experiences. This is not made up stuff folks.

Fungus that appears on a bit of uneaten flake food is another matter entirely. As is fungus that appears on open wounds on a fish or other aquatic vertebrate. I am not a microbiologist so I don't know how many types of fungus there may be. Some may be safe, some clearly are not. Dawn may be able to offer us more on this. But please do not write this off as some sort of make-believe. There is a definite and real danger with some types of fungus, and it kills fish.
Byron is correct. There is no way to pinpoint the exact species of fungus growing on a given piece of aquarium wood (unless you want to spend months working with the Smithsonian Institute sorting it out). What we do know is that fungus growing on anything in an aquarium housing fish poses some risk to the animals, whether directly visible or not.
Try to think of it this way... a person out in the woods searching for berries, finds something they don't recognize... do they eat it or leave it? Should they risk the potential for getting sick, possibly dying from eating something toxic? To me this falls into the category of "just because you can doesn't mean you should."
There are a number of species of fungus that are not directly toxic to the animals, but rather feed on or utilize something within the water chemistry, something the fish/animals need to survive. In some cases this can be oxygen, some cases could be specific minerals. Fungus doesn't grow if conditions are not perfect for it, but has the ability to lie dormant for years, awaiting just the right situation to allow it to thrive. There are fungus spores in the air we breathe, all around us, and even inside of wood. Baking wood can trigger the growth of some species of fungus, as can boiling it, because its a matter of temperature that sets the right environment for it to start.

I have been keeping wood in my aquariums for over 20 yrs. Very few pieces have ever given me a fungus issue. When working at the store we had wood in over 100 tanks, and again, very seldom a fungus issue. Of all my fish keeping friends and colleagues over the course of 20+ yrs, fungus on wood is not "common" in most types of wood, and we tend to avoid those few types where it is. Why? Because we know the dangers to our animals, the risk involved.

And one last comment about identification... unless you're going to put the fungus under a microscope and do the work do properly identify it as fungus, algae, cyano bacteria, etc. there is no way to know positively if it is safe or not. For those who claim its common and "no big deal" I would have to say you are very lucky, but luck is known, at some point, to run out. I hope for your sakes that it doesn't run out at a critical moment and kill your fish.

The best thing to do with wood that is growing fungus that doesn't go away with a good scrubbing in some clean water, is to throw it out, find another use for it, or take it back where you bought it from and ask them to replace it for a healthy piece. Knowing that certain types of wood are well known for it means either taking the risk of wasting your money or avoiding those types of wood.

Dawn Moneyhan
Aquatics Specialist/Nutritionist
Juneau, WI
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post #18 of 18 Old 05-17-2011, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
well baked it and the fungus went away and have it in my 38 because it would be harder to efect them there and so far no growth... yet. When I said ten hours was a bit longer then actual but around 7-8 and I will check the places it looks soft and just squeeze it

38 gallon :
Pelvicachromis Taeniatus Nigerian Red not yet breeding pair
4 Pangio Kuhli
12 Hemmigrammus Bleheri
2 Botia Lohachata
1 Botia Straita
1 Ancistrus Sp.
6 Poecilia Reticulata




The Wet Spot Portland Oregon!!!!!!

ADA: Do!aqua Iwagumi 10 gallon size!
7 Clown Killies
7 Ghost shrimp
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