Fish All Skimming Surface? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
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Fish All Skimming Surface?

I have a relatively new tank 29Gal. It has cycled Ok but I have a milky look to the water that will not go away.
I am doing water changes etc. Anyway the point of this post is now my fish 3 black skirt tetras are all skimming the surface and will not eat.
Any ideas?
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post #2 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 11:12 AM
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I have a relatively new tank 29Gal. It has cycled Ok but I have a milky look to the water that will not go away.
I am doing water changes etc. Anyway the point of this post is now my fish 3 black skirt tetras are all skimming the surface and will not eat.
Any ideas?
Keep up large quantity water changes every day. Sounds like ammonia/nitrite is poisoning your fish.

:[ I'm a bad man
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post #3 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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My Ammonia and nitrates/Nitrites readings are 0. The water is a little hard 180 but all other readings are good.
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 11:21 AM
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My Ammonia and nitrates/Nitrites readings are 0. The water is a little hard 180 but all other readings are good.
Liquid Master test Kit?

:[ I'm a bad man
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post #5 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
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I use API Master Kit and am also using strip tests.
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 12:46 PM
Do a large water change of at least 50% or more and increase surface movement as much as possible. If ammonia and nitrite are nill then you have a oxygen problem. Since you said there is a slight milky look to they water I would say you have have a bacterial bloom which is eating up the O2.

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post #7 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 12:50 PM
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Do the fish look like they are "eating" air at the surface?

Can you give us more info: how long as the tank been running? How many and what type of fish? Live plants or not? How often and how much water is changed? Any "stuff" aside from water conditioner being put in the tank? What is the pH? And have you tested nitrates and what is the number (if you use the API nitrate kit, shake regent #2 for 2 minutes, not 30 seconds, before adding the drops)?

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 12:50 PM
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Do a large water change of at least 50% or more and increase surface movement as much as possible. If ammonia and nitrite are nill then you have a oxygen problem. Since you said there is a slight milky look to they water I would say you have have a bacterial bloom which is eating up the O2.
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post #9 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, i increased water surface motion and they seem to be better now.
Any ideas as to how to get rid of this milky looking water?
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-19-2010, 07:31 PM
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Thanks, i increased water surface motion and they seem to be better now.
Any ideas as to how to get rid of this milky looking water?
If it is a bacterial bloom, as seems likely, a water change will make it worse. Best to leave it. As long as the fish are more normal, they are fine.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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