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Fish all dying!

This is a discussion on Fish all dying! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ^^ What exactly is ro water? I've never heard of it before.. I have airstones in and active carbon in the filter :] I ...

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Old 08-01-2011, 03:53 AM   #11
 
^^ What exactly is ro water? I've never heard of it before.. I have airstones in and active carbon in the filter :]
I took all the fish out of the tank, because they were just about to die. They are all really good now in different tanks, but still trying to figure out the big one..
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:07 AM   #12
 
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ro is reversed osmosis water your get them once a special filter filters out all the trace elements in the water it's 100% pure h2o.it's harsh on the fish if you use 100% ro water and they can't live in it. by diluting it with tap water you get very soft water.guppies don't need really soft water.i told you to add ro to dilute what ever is in the tanks water to make it more hospitable.
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Old 08-01-2011, 07:39 AM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenalover View Post
I have 3 tanks, a 44g, a 20g and a 10g.
When I first put fish into the 44g, around 10 guppies died within the first week. I had guppies, cories, a betta and a gourami in it.
When they were dying, they looked like they were gasping for air, their gills were moving really quick.
All the guppies died, except one, I filled the 20g, and put him in there. He is healthy now.

I tested the 44g's water for ammonia, and nothing. The pH is 7.0.
Today, the betta died, the gourami hasn't been eating, and the cories are pale.
I did a 25% water change, and added more circulation.

I use the same water for all the tanks, and the two smaller tanks have had no problems.
The only difference is that in the 44g, I have sand, live plants, and driftwood. The other tanks are all fake. Could that make a difference?

Thank you!
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenalover View Post
It had only been running for 4 days when I added the fish, because a disease broke out in the 20g, so I had to move them. It's been running for probably 3 months now.
I have an Aquaclear50 filter, and a 60gallon air pump.
The temperature is 77-78. I added all the fish at pretty much the same time.
From what you have described the 10 guppies that you lost in the first week when you added them to the tank I would suspect ammonia poisioning. The quick gill movement gasping for air are some of the signs of ammonia levels being too high. When you added the fish to the tank it was still cycling and that many fish added at one time would especially with livebearers would have created one huge bio load. Since the tank has been running for 3 months now I would suspect that it has probably cycled, the best way to determine that is to take a reading for ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Ammonia and nitrites should be reading at 0 and nitrates should be 20 or less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lenalover View Post
Test strips are not very realiable, you would be better off investing in a liquid test kit such as API master test kit. I have tried using test strips myself in the past and found from personal experience that they where less realiable then using a liquid test kit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_penang View Post
ro is reversed osmosis water your get them once a special filter filters out all the trace elements in the water it's 100% pure h2o.it's harsh on the fish if you use 100% ro water and they can't live in it. by diluting it with tap water you get very soft water.guppies don't need really soft water.i told you to add ro to dilute what ever is in the tanks water to make it more hospitable.
I myself would personally not use ro water if you have not been using it already. It can cause changes in the hardness and ph of your water that is in the tank already. Ro water is used usually by people to adjust the hardness of the water and the ph.

What is you maintenance on this tank? How often do you do water changes and how much water do you change out? Have you changed filter media recently?
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Old 08-01-2011, 07:47 AM   #14
 
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yeah it is used to soften the water as i dilutes a lot of he existing elements in the tank
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:09 AM   #15
 
Do you use a water conditioner? SO important, all the time, but in new tanks your fish will die QUICKLY (sometimes) if there are trace minerals in your water. I had a tank a while back that I didn't use conditioner in and my fish never seemed to mind for months, then I did a major water change one day and most of them died. I was able to save some of the hardier ones, but I learned my lesson.

Sorry to go on and on if you do use one, but you didn't mention it so I thought I'd chime in ;)
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:16 AM   #16
 
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nutrafin is the best conditioner
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:35 AM   #17
 
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I agree with BarbH about the test strips but if I understand right this tank is a new one not one that has been set up which if thats the case it has not cycled yet and thats what probably killed the fish. You can speed up the cycle by adding some gravel in a knee high stocking from an established tank to this one or planting lots and lots of plants in the tank.
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Old 08-01-2011, 03:54 PM   #18
 
Quote:
From what you have described the 10 guppies that you lost in the first week when you added them to the tank I would suspect ammonia poisioning. The quick gill movement gasping for air are some of the signs of ammonia levels being too high. When you added the fish to the tank it was still cycling and that many fish added at one time would especially with livebearers would have created one huge bio load. Since the tank has been running for 3 months now I would suspect that it has probably cycled, the best way to determine that is to take a reading for ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Ammonia and nitrites should be reading at 0 and nitrates should be 20 or less.
I tested for ammonia shortly after they died, and it was negative. But, I still added the ammonia remover into the tank just in case. Could nitrites or nitrates kill fish? I have never tested for those, so that might be it.
Something is still wrong in the tank though, because before I moved the fish, which was a couple of days ago, they were dying.
I also lost a betta a few days ago.

Quote:
Test strips are not very realiable, you would be better off investing in a liquid test kit such as API master test kit. I have tried using test strips myself in the past and found from personal experience that they where less realiable then using a liquid test kit.
Okay, I will have to do that. Thanks!

Quote:
What is you maintenance on this tank? How often do you do water changes and how much water do you change out? Have you changed filter media recently?
I was doing 25% water changes in the 44g. every 2 weeks. I changed the carbon insert last week, and cleaned out the sponge.

Quote:
Do you use a water conditioner?
Yep. :]

Quote:
I agree with BarbH about the test strips but if I understand right this tank is a new one not one that has been set up which if thats the case it has not cycled yet and thats what probably killed the fish. You can speed up the cycle by adding some gravel in a knee high stocking from an established tank to this one or planting lots and lots of plants in the tank.
Okay, thanks. I've never had problems in the smaller tanks and I never cycled them. The blue gourami was in the 44g., but I moved him to the 10g. for the time being. I had just filled the 10 gallon, and put him in. And, now he is healthy as can be. He wasn't eating for weeks in the big tank, but the first day I put him in the small one, he was eating.

Now, I remember, I filled the 44g. for the 1st time with water from the hose.. That could be the problem, because I use tap water for all the other tanks...
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:01 PM   #19
 
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Yes that maybe your problem. I belive another member (Aunt Kymmie) had a problem were she had filled one of her tanks with her hose instead of from the tap and all or most of her fish died in that tank while the rest were fine if I can remember I belive thats what it was in the end.
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:11 PM   #20
 
^^ Okay, that is probably the problem. I will have to empty the tank and start over :]
Thanks!
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