Filter Question - Submerse or external
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Filter Question - Submerse or external

This is a discussion on Filter Question - Submerse or external within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Hello I would like any feedback on the benefits of a submersable internal filter like the Fluval U series vs an external canister filters. ...

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Filter Question - Submerse or external
Old 10-27-2011, 02:25 PM   #1
 
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Filter Question - Submerse or external

Hello I would like any feedback on the benefits of a submersable internal filter like the Fluval U series vs an external canister filters. Thanks!
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Old 10-27-2011, 03:07 PM   #2
 
We just had another thread much like this.
I think that the Fluval U's are way over priced at $35+. As for HOB's, everyone here knows I like the AquaClear and you could have one for your tank for under $25.

If you really want an in tank submersible, are just a little handy and already have an air pump, you really should look at this (one of the best DIY bottle filters I've seen):
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Old 10-27-2011, 03:12 PM   #3
 
Both have their advantages. The internal filters are great for tanks placed in locations that do not have a lot of space. Generally, their filtration capacity is limited and the amount of media they can handle is limited. Additionally, most internal filters will not be as versatile in flow rates, media swapping, directional flow, etc. I think the Fluval U actually is one of the internals that have more options, it has a spray bar and a nozzle for flow direction if im not mistaken.

If you have the space, external canisters are a better deal. They hold more media and the media is customizable in most canisters. It will also give you flow options, direction and does not intrude on the overall look inside the tank, only intake and output tubes. Canisters are also easier to clean, IMO, as you just turn it off, disconnect and reconnect the base when done.
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:23 AM   #4
 
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Other factors also affect filtration. Tank size [by which I am not meaning the filter size to fit, but certain filters are more practical for small or large tanks], live plants, type of fish.
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Old 10-28-2011, 04:21 PM   #5
 
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It will be for a 30 to 55 gallon tank. Im a little confused how the external canisters work with just two tubes. One in and one out? I am tired of weekly water changes with the 10 and 36 gallons I have.
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Old 10-28-2011, 05:08 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newby View Post
It will be for a 30 to 55 gallon tank. Im a little confused how the external canisters work with just two tubes. One in and one out? I am tired of weekly water changes with the 10 and 36 gallons I have.
Sorry to be a buzz-kill, but no matter what type of filter, you'll still need to do your water changes!
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Old 10-28-2011, 08:42 PM   #7
 
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Sorry to be a buzz-kill, but no matter what type of filter, you'll still need to do your water changes!
Yep!
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Old 10-29-2011, 11:31 AM   #8
 
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Absolutely.

There is no substitute for regular weekly partial water changes in any tank with fish. No filter can accomplish what the water change accomplishes.
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Old 10-30-2011, 08:52 AM   #9
 
There is sometimes a misconception that more, better filtration will somehow reduce or eliminate the need for routine water changes. As the others point out, this couldn't be further from the truth. Although good filtration is necessary and some types of filtration 'may' push out the frequency or reduce the required volume of the water change, the fact is that the routine water change is the number one best way to reduce the pollution in the aquarium. In nature, fresh water is re-made fresh by the routine introduction of rain water. In the tiny closed containers we have, we have to simulate the rain.

To answer you question, yes, a canister has a single inlet and outlet, most often positioned in opposite ends of the tank. Modern canister filters are excellent filters for larger tanks. Your tank is a little small for a canister, but there are small ones available.

There are also some good HOBs out there and if you're planning to have a lot of plants, as Byron often says, you may need only a small sponge filter to keep things neat.

But again, the weekly water change is still required and is the best way to manage your tank.
Like some others, I do a 50% weekly water change EVERY Saturday morning. If you can easily siphon to a drain or outdoors and get a hose hookup for a faucet, weekly tank maintenance is a breeze.

The solution to pollution is dilution.
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