Filter cleaning help - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Filter cleaning help

Filter cleaning help

This is a discussion on Filter cleaning help within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by slojko ive only had it for 4 months so ill check it out when im home, also why do you wash ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Oscar
Oscar
Badis
Badis
Like Tree8Likes

Reply
Old 12-06-2012, 09:20 AM   #11
 
1077's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slojko View Post
ive only had it for 4 months so ill check it out when im home, also why do you wash your pads and then replace them? or are you talking about 2 different pads?

Eheim blue pads get washed ,rinsed, as mentioned in old tank water or clean dechlorinated water and (Returned to the filter).
I only replace the pad's when they begin to come apart after repeated rinsing/washing's.
Sorry about confusion.
lakemalawifish likes this.
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to 1077 For This Useful Post:
slojko (12-06-2012)
Old 12-06-2012, 10:49 AM   #12
 
So glad when folks add in helpful comments to existing threads, there are so many steps and so much to know that it's very hard for one person to cover everything. Thanks ya'll for having my back :)
slojko likes this.
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 01:11 PM   #13
 
i have well water on tap, would it be okay to clean the filter with that?
slojko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 01:21 PM   #14
 
I would be nervous about using well water, or any other tap water with chlorine, etc. for cleaning canisters and canister filter materials. I only use water that has been removed from the fish tank for cleaning that way I don't have to worry about killing off the beneficial bacterial that has built up. Some people will only clean one tray at a time, or just part of the media in the canister, for the same reason. And only vacuum one section of the substrate at a time. We have 2 canisters running so when I clean one (with tank water) I do not worry so much about this and go ahead and clean the entire canister and vacuum all of the substrate. But, we have large filter systems, large tanks and big fish. With smaller tank systems, a person may want to err on the side of caution and alternate a portion of cleaning at a time.
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 11:12 AM   #15
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I concur with all that has been posted to date. I would only mention that you needn't fuss over using tank water to clean filter media, except in fairly new systems, or in "special" tanks such as a QT that lacks any substrate. There is more bacteria in the substrate and elsewhere in the tank than in the filter, assuming an established tank (running a few months). It doesn't hurt to be overly-cautious, but it isn't necessary, just so you know.

You haven't mention live plants either, and as someone noted if these are present even in newer tanks you won't (or shouldn't under normal conditions) have any issues.

While I have always washed filters under the tap, and everything else for that matter (and my water is heavily chlorinated) I'm not relying on just my own experience here; many sources will offer this approach. And I suspect it may actually be helpful; any undesirable bacteria in the filter would be just as well getting killed off.

To add another interesting tidbit, the most recent studies suggest that nitrification in the aquarium is not carried out by bacteria at all, but by another form of life known as archaea. A significant study from 2011 can be found here
PLOS ONE: Aquarium Nitrification Revisited: Thaumarchaeota Are the Dominant Ammonia Oxidizers in Freshwater Aquarium Biofilters
though I warn you it is highly scientific. But just so you know I'm not dreaming this up...

I haven't gone into this in any detail, an article in PFK a couple months back brought this to my attention, so I can't say if this archaea is killed by chlorine or not, though I would suspect it might be, but that is just supposition. Archaea used to be considered as a bacterium, but is now separated as a domain of single-celled organisms, of which there are three: bacteria, archaea and eukaryota. The singular form of the name is archaeon, plural being archaea.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 12-07-2012 at 11:24 AM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 11:54 AM   #16
 
Just an example of why i am leaving this forum - read before deleted by mods

Quote:
Originally Posted by byron View Post
i concur with all that has been posted to date. I would only mention that you needn't fuss over using tank water to clean filter media, except in fairly new systems, or in "special" tanks such as a qt that lacks any substrate. There is more bacteria in the substrate and elsewhere in the tank than in the filter, assuming an established tank (running a few months). It doesn't hurt to be overly-cautious, but it isn't necessary, just so you know.

You haven't mention live plants either, and as someone noted if these are present even in newer tanks you won't (or shouldn't under normal conditions) have any issues.

While i have always washed filters under the tap, and everything else for that matter (and my water is heavily chlorinated) i'm not relying on just my own experience here; many sources will offer this approach. And i suspect it may actually be helpful; any undesirable bacteria in the filter would be just as well getting killed off.

to add another interesting tidbit, the most recent studies suggest that nitrification in the aquarium is not carried out by bacteria at all, but by another form of life known as archaea. A significant study from 2011 can be found here
plos one: Aquarium nitrification revisited: Thaumarchaeota are the dominant ammonia oxidizers in freshwater aquarium biofilters
though i warn you it is highly scientific. But just so you know i'm not dreaming this up...

i haven't gone into this in any detail, an article in pfk a couple months back brought this to my attention, so i can't say if this archaea is killed by chlorine or not, though i would suspect it might be, but that is just supposition. Archaea used to be considered as a bacterium, but is now separated as a domain of single-celled organisms, of which there are three: Bacteria, archaea and eukaryota. The singular form of the name is archaeon, plural being archaea.

Byron.
honestly, is all of this really necessary?? You have even contradicted yourself in this posting.

Folks use tank water unless you have a planted tank and you want to do things byron's way.

I am out of here, folks enjoy your fish and i highly suggest you do your own research
lakemalawifish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:05 PM   #17
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakemalawifish View Post
honestly, is all of this really necessary?? You have even contradicted yourself in this posting.

Folks use tank water unless you have a planted tank and you want to do things byron's way.

I am out of here, folks enjoy your fish and i highly suggest you do your own research

That sounds awfuly argumenative...

It is true that it really doesn't mater if you use tank water or tap water to clean filter pads in a normal established aquarium, with or without plants.

This is easily seen with people who use carteridge HOBs who replace the carteridge every month without their tanks re-cycling... I use to do that for two years until I learned the Activated Carbon wasn't really doing anything and I could just rinse out the pad.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:23 PM   #18
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Well, I thought this forum was a place to exchange information, opinions, knowledge... whatever. A place to learn [I'm still learning, sometimes from here, sometimes elsewhere online]. A place to assist others by explaining the "why" behind this and that. I like to know the whole picture, and the reason for each; I had thought most others do as well. Obvious some don't.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:35 PM   #19
 
1077's Avatar
 
I agree that rinsing the filter material under tapwater in mature tank (month's) is prolly not gonna be to detrimental but,,, many who post here are new, with newly established tank's and as such ,,I choose to present the least harmful advice I can with this in mind.
Other'perhap's can get too aggressive with gravel vaccum,and other's remove everything from their tank's and clean rock's, wood, and I suspect they would clean the fish too if they could get the fish to hold still.(this all destroy's portion of biological filter)
I simply posted my method as asked, and am dissapointed with the climate here as of late with pissing matches over trivial crap such as rinsing filter pad's,adding extra dechlorinator.

Life is too short, and I prefer to spend what time I have left in more interesting way's.
Keep your water clean,,and fishes will respond favorably.
lakemalawifish likes this.
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to 1077 For This Useful Post:
slojko (12-08-2012)
Old 12-07-2012, 02:31 PM   #20
 
jeaninel's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
Other'perhap's can get too aggressive with gravel vaccum,and other's remove everything from their tank's and clean rock's, wood, and I suspect they would clean the fish too if they could get the fish to hold still.
LOL Too funny 1077!
jeaninel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cleaning a filter scooterjuniuspilot Freshwater Aquarium Equipment 5 03-16-2009 02:56 AM
Filter cleaning jesterns2 Saltwater Aquarium Equipment 5 02-20-2009 06:34 PM
Cleaning HOB filter bigk_54 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 2 12-06-2008 08:45 PM
Cleaning A Filter Mycael Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 2 02-29-2008 05:11 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:48 AM.