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A Few Questions for a New Tank

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A Few Questions for a New Tank
Old 06-07-2012, 01:16 PM   #11
 
The facultative (decomposition of organic matter) bacteria that causes cloudy water is not affected by light and is not the nitrosomonas or nitrobacter bacteria associated with the nitrogen cycle. For a new tank, although there are exceptions, it normally clears up in a few days.
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Old 06-07-2012, 04:16 PM   #12
 
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The facultative (decomposition of organic matter) bacteria that causes cloudy water is not affected by light and is not the nitrosomonas or nitrobacter bacteria associated with the nitrogen cycle. For a new tank, although there are exceptions, it normally clears up in a few days.
thanks for setting us straight
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:55 PM   #13
 
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i could be wrong but that haze in the water, if it doesnt clear up, could be from the flourescent light. ive tried several different flourescent bulbs and always end up with standard incandescent bulbs for a light thats not overpowering. you could hold a lamp with a standard bulb over the tank to see if thats the problem.
Thanks for the input guys. This had actually ourred to me but wasnt sure if it was just me being paranoid. Will have to rumage around and try to find an incandescent bult to compare.

On the subject of water hardness, can an electrical conductivity meter (used for measureing soil salinitiy) be usful for measureing general hardness in your tank? For those who arent familiar with them you make a 5:1 water to soil ratio mix, let stand and then the meter measures the electrical conductivity in the water - the more disolved salts/minerals the higher the reading. Just a thought as I have access to one of these in my line of work.

Thanks
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:50 PM   #14
 
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i could be wrong but that haze in the water, if it doesnt clear up, could be from the flourescent light. ive tried several different flourescent bulbs and always end up with standard incandescent bulbs for a light thats not overpowering. you could hold a lamp with a standard bulb over the tank to see if thats the problem.
To get back to a previous subject briefly, you can just try reducing the hours that the fluorescent light is on, but that is just applicable to a photosynthetic algae bloom where the cells depend on light, what is known sometimes as green water. A whitish or grayish bacterial bloom does not use light, as far as I know, and should go away by itself - water changes won't help it.

Last edited by equatics; 06-07-2012 at 07:55 PM..
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Old 06-08-2012, 05:11 PM   #15
 
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Thanks for the input guys. This had actually ourred to me but wasnt sure if it was just me being paranoid. Will have to rumage around and try to find an incandescent bult to compare.

On the subject of water hardness, can an electrical conductivity meter (used for measureing soil salinitiy) be usful for measureing general hardness in your tank? For those who arent familiar with them you make a 5:1 water to soil ratio mix, let stand and then the meter measures the electrical conductivity in the water - the more disolved salts/minerals the higher the reading. Just a thought as I have access to one of these in my line of work.

Thanks
Yes and no. While "hardness" in the broadest sense of the term means the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the water, this does not distinguish calcareous minerals like calcium and magnesium that establish the GH or general hardness that we use to refer to mineral hardness from the rest. Both are very important to fish.

The mineral hardness we tend to control/establish and this is what we refer to by soft or hard water, and fish have preferences and these impact their internal physiology. Minerals can block the kidney tubes for example in soft water fish; while with hard water fish the absence of these minerals causes other problems and usually death sooner or later.

TDS if excessive can also make life difficult for fish, but most of us do not bother measuring these as we know we can control them somewhat by not adding substances to the aquarium. Water conditioners, chemicals/medications, fish food, water adjustment substances, etc all add TDS, so limiting these to the essentials tends to work well enough. Another reason not to over-dose the water conditioner at the water changes.

On the bacterial bloom issue, you might find this helpful:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 06-08-2012 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 06-09-2012, 05:15 AM   #16
 
Thanks for that.

While the tank is Cycling I have been thinking over the species issue mentioned by Geomancer earlier and decided to go with Tetras by and large. Had in mind some combination of
Neon Tetra
Lemon Tetra
Ember Tetra
Silvertip Tetra
Black Tetra
Rummynose Tetra
Some bottom feeders to help clean up
A couple of center piece fish that would be adapted in soft/slightly acidic water that would be peaceful with the tetras.

Would appreciate any suggestions or corrections along these lines.
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Old 06-09-2012, 11:13 AM   #17
 
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Thanks for that.

While the tank is Cycling I have been thinking over the species issue mentioned by Geomancer earlier and decided to go with Tetras by and large. Had in mind some combination of
Neon Tetra
Lemon Tetra
Ember Tetra
Silvertip Tetra
Black Tetra
Rummynose Tetra
Some bottom feeders to help clean up
A couple of center piece fish that would be adapted in soft/slightly acidic water that would be peaceful with the tetras.

Would appreciate any suggestions or corrections along these lines.
Not sure what exactly the "Black Tetra" is. If Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (commonly the Black Widow Tetra or Black Skirt Tetra), I would not myself include this; as noted in the profile, it can get nippy. A better "black" tetra would be the Black Phantom, Hyphessobrycon megalopterus, a little gem. You can read more in the profiles (click shaded names).

"Centrepiece" is a 40g with shoaling tetra is restrictive. A dwarf cichlid perhaps, if you want to remain geographic (South America). A single Bolivian Ram, or a bonded pair, but if the latter they will regularly spawn. Pairs must bond, that is, the male selects his female from the group and they form a bonded pair usually for life (4 years). If any female and male are put together, the male will not necessarily accept her, and that means she will be dead before long. I've had this occur even in as large a space as my 5-foot tank. The common Blue Ram needs water too warm for several of the other fish mentioned, so i wouldn't consider this species.

For the substrate, corys. There are so many species (well over 150 now), many are in our profiles. A group of 5 minimum if one species, or if two or three species you can have 3-5 of each species. There's room, and the more corys the better for them and you. Some other interesting "catfish" could be the Whiptail Catfish or the Red Lizard Whiptail, or Farlowella vittata.

Byron.
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Old 06-09-2012, 05:52 PM   #18
 
Thanks Byron,

Your right I actually meant Black Neon Tetra, I really shouldn't try and post with the Mrs trying to talk to me at the same time

I've been playing with the intelligent fish stocking site and it looks like I can have around 8 of each this seems like a lot of fish but then again they are small. Does this sound like a healthy stocking level?

Another dilemma is how many to add at one time? I do have a problem here in that to get anything other than neons I will have order them and that puts $15 shipping onto the order. So the more I can put in at one time the better, however I do not want to compromise the fishes chances of survival or cause a mini cycle due to loading it up too fast. Can anyone provide guidance or share their experiences with tetras on this?

Cheers
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Old 06-09-2012, 07:17 PM   #19
 
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Thanks Byron,

Your right I actually meant Black Neon Tetra, I really shouldn't try and post with the Mrs trying to talk to me at the same time

I've been playing with the intelligent fish stocking site and it looks like I can have around 8 of each this seems like a lot of fish but then again they are small. Does this sound like a healthy stocking level?

Another dilemma is how many to add at one time? I do have a problem here in that to get anything other than neons I will have order them and that puts $15 shipping onto the order. So the more I can put in at one time the better, however I do not want to compromise the fishes chances of survival or cause a mini cycle due to loading it up too fast. Can anyone provide guidance or share their experiences with tetras on this?

Cheers
You have six species listed, so in a 50g 4-foot tank you have space for 8 of each. I would increase some of these further, the neon tetra for instance would be better with say 12.

If live plants are in the tank, you can add complete groups at the same time. If you have enough plants, you could even add all the fish at the same time. I've done it often when setting up new tanks, or re-setting existing tanks with new substrate or whatever. I would always add all of the same species together, only because the more there are the quicker they settle.
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Old 06-11-2012, 11:42 PM   #20
 
Thanks for the input guys.
For the cleaning niche would Khuli Loaches fill the same role as Corys?

Byron - If i can pick your brain (or anyone else's who can help) a little bit more, the plants I have or will have very soon when they arrive are 1 Amazon Sword (medium in size) 1 small Java fern, 2 hanfulls of Java Moss, 1 plant of Water Sprite and 1 bunch of a strap-like plant (struggling to identify it, long flat leaves like a sag or Lomandra on land I would say, its doing very well. Been in 2 weeks and has sent out runners with 6 new plants pushing up throught the sand!). Is this enough plants to ease the burden to add entire groups, or *gulp* the whole lot at once when its all settled in? Will try and get a photo but struggling to get any decent pic without it being all flash or just rubbish.

Cheers
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