Dry Base Rock in Freshwater Setup
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Dry Base Rock in Freshwater Setup

This is a discussion on Dry Base Rock in Freshwater Setup within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Hey just like to say what a great community you have here. Anyways on to my question, I was wondering if I can use ...

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Dry Base Rock in Freshwater Setup
Old 03-25-2007, 08:10 PM   #1
 
Dry Base Rock in Freshwater Setup

Hey just like to say what a great community you have here.

Anyways on to my question, I was wondering if I can use dry base rock for my freshwater tank. The reason why I want to add base rock is that I want to make it easier for me in the future when I end up wanting to switch to a saltwater tank. I have heard that clean, dried base rock is okay to use in a freshwater setup, however I want more opinions. I am currently setting up a 29g tank.

Thanks
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Old 03-25-2007, 08:17 PM   #2
 
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I wouldn't recommend using any substrate that is calcium carbonate based in a freshwater tank. It will affect your pH levels and water hardness.
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Old 03-25-2007, 08:40 PM   #3
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leifthebunny
I wouldn't recommend using any substrate that is calcium carbonate based in a freshwater tank. It will affect your pH levels and water hardness.
Is that really going to effect the fish as much. If it is clean and dry, isnt base rock just like any other rock?

Damn! really want to use these rocks in my freshwater setup. :(
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Old 03-25-2007, 09:30 PM   #4
 
no dont use it, the fact that its dry doesnt apeal to me, it was probably harvested from our worlds reef systems, full of life and beneficial things, then someone decided to dry it up and all the life that took hundreds of years to create just dies, dont encourage other people to use this rare rock in a freshwater set-up, its pretty much a waste. Even though it is just base rock and isnt really full of life, it might give the wrong impression and people might start using live rock and drying it out etc.

Base rock is taken from our reef systems and is not like any other rock since it is dead coral, it should have been full of beneficial bacteria, maybe not life form, but the dried part is just wasted of bacteria. Base rock isnt as good as live rock but it still belongs moist and should only be in saltwater aquariums or the ocean.
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:17 PM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigga
Quote:
Originally Posted by leifthebunny
I wouldn't recommend using any substrate that is calcium carbonate based in a freshwater tank. It will affect your pH levels and water hardness.
Is that really going to effect the fish as much. If it is clean and dry, isnt base rock just like any other rock?
Most fresh water fish prefer softer water. The Calcium Carbonate makes the water harder. In a salt water aquarium, the base rock is needed. You might want to check out here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Substrate_(aquarium)
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:21 PM   #6
 
Okay thanks for the info. Kind of a bummer not being able to use it. It looks so nice inside a tank.
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:28 PM   #7
 
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Even with the neutral rock in a freshwater aquarium, it's pretty common to unknowingly adjust the pH of the tank.

You might want to consider just using seperate tank for the fresh & salt waters. Both have their advantages. I really like the plants. Gives me something to grow outside of my Canadian Red Cherrys. :p On less than a 1/4 acre, I don't get much opportunity and it is easier to keep my neighbor from chucking dog **** in my tank. :P
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Old 03-27-2007, 09:17 PM   #8
 
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You can use calcium based substrate with the proper kind of freshwater fish. In addition to the obvious African Rift Lake Cichlids, most of the Gulf of Mexico Littoral, including the Everglades, sits on a big limestone shelf - fossil coral, essentially. So any of the fish from that area thrive in hard water - Mollies, Guppies, Platies, Swordtails, Firemouth Cichlids, Texas Cichlids, Pupfish, Florida Flag Fish, Pygmy Sunfish, Violet Gobies, to name a few. And you won't need to salt the water, as all of them are evolved to regulate their osmotic pressure equally well with calcium or sodium. The only thing I have had trouble finding for that biotope is a catfish that doesn't get enormous or need straight up brackish water. Blind Cave Tetras also come from a similar situation - limestone caves.

So you can use it with freswater fish, but you just have to be more selective. Also, check what plants you can use carefully. Basically, if it can handle brackish, it can handle hard water. Vals are the typical hardwater plant, but hornwort, Elodea, Java Moss, Java Fern, and some Anubias and Crypt species do really well too.
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