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Do you quarantine?

This is a discussion on Do you quarantine? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Jayy I've never quarantined before, but I would like to start. It's been mainly because of lack of space, but I'm ...

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View Poll Results: Do you quarantine new fish, and for how long?
Nope, I don't, and have had no problems. 8 47.06%
Nope, I don't, but have had at least one disease outbreak w/ addition of new fish. 4 23.53%
Yes, I do - but only wild-caught fish. 0 0%
Yes, I do - for 2 weeks. 0 0%
Yes, I do - for 3 weeks. 1 5.88%
Yes, I do - for 4 weeks. 2 11.76%
Yes, I do - for 6 weeks or more. 0 0%
YES - and I do because I've had problems in the past. 3 17.65%
YES - no past problems but do it because it's the best practice. 0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-29-2012, 03:07 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayy View Post
I've never quarantined before, but I would like to start. It's been mainly because of lack of space, but I'm sure I set up a ten gallon QT tank. Any advice?
Plants....nice lovely plants lol.
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:12 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by Termato View Post
Plants....nice lovely plants lol.
Do they help in the progress?
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:16 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Jayy View Post
Do they help in the progress?
They provide algae as extra food for the fish (the extra algae that will grow on their leaves...not problematic if you keep the lights on normally). Plants are good for cover from light. The plants will also help soak up any extra ammonia created from the stressed fish. The fish will be extra stressed from being moved so it will secrete more ammonia. I just find plants to be a beneficial addition to every tank in all possible ways. The plants will also help decompose the waste produced by the fish. All in all...good choice IMO.
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:18 PM   #14
 
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Originally Posted by Termato View Post
They provide algae as extra food for the fish (the extra algae that will grow on their leaves...not problematic if you keep the lights on normally). Plants are good for cover from light. The plants will also help soak up any extra ammonia created from the stressed fish. The fish will be extra stressed from being moved so it will secrete more ammonia. I just find plants to be a beneficial addition to every tank in all possible ways. The plants will also help decompose the waste produced by the fish. All in all...good choice IMO.
Okay I'm doing all planted tanks anyway. Would it be better bare bottom or with substrate?
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:22 PM   #15
 
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I was told to do bare-bottom so that you can see how the poop looks.

Because of that, I was thinking of doing fake plants for the water column, but then use some floating plants from my large tank. They'd help fish feel more secure, and help with possible ammonia.

But I dunno...
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:24 PM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by Jayy View Post
Okay I'm doing all planted tanks anyway. Would it be better bare bottom or with substrate?
IMO I would say 100% go Substrate.

Sand is best if you don't want to go the mother nature route of soil.

Sand Gravel works GREAT too. they are small enough pebbles that it is not a problem.

If you don't want sand...go gravel...although sand is harder to clean it is better for bacteria.

All my tanks are gravel or small gravel. I don't like dealing with sand. Maybe if I get a bigger tank in the future I will def do that. Gravel is just easier for me to maintain now because I don't have as much time.

The type substrate comes down more to a personal opinion and needs, but I do recommend you use some kind of substrate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by magpie View Post
I was told to do bare-bottom so that you can see how the poop looks.

Because of that, I was thinking of doing fake plants for the water column, but then use some floating plants from my large tank. They'd help fish feel more secure, and help with possible ammonia.

But I dunno...
You can use white sand for this. Works great. Black Sand works well too. Any color that isn't brown.
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:28 PM   #17
 
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Originally Posted by Termato View Post
IMO I would say 100% go Substrate.

Sand is best if you don't want to go the mother nature route of soil.

Sand Gravel works GREAT too. they are small enough pebbles that it is not a problem.

If you don't want sand...go gravel...although sand is harder to clean it is better for bacteria.

All my tanks are gravel or small gravel. I don't like dealing with sand. Maybe if I get a bigger tank in the future I will def do that. Gravel is just easier for me to maintain now because I don't have as much time.

The type substrate comes down more to a personal opinion and needs, but I do recommend you use some kind of substrate.



You can use white sand for this. Works great. Black Sand works well too. Any color that isn't brown.
Ok, I've worked with sand before, I like it. I want to use it in all or most of my tanks. I'm currently using it in my 55 planted.
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:53 PM   #18
 
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But with some diseases, they get white stringy poop, so I think you'd miss that with white sand...

I agree, I really like the sand-type gravel where it is very fine, and I use that. But that's for my larger tank. I've read time and time again to go without substrate for Q tanks... but would love to hear your reasoning for substrate in one. Or is it just to hold plants down? If you want live plants in a Q tank, you could always do java fern or anubias tied with thread to rocks or other decor...
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:55 PM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by magpie View Post
But with some diseases, they get white stringy poop, so I think you'd miss that with white sand...

I agree, I really like the sand-type gravel where it is very fine, and I use that. But that's for my larger tank. I've read time and time again to go without substrate for Q tanks... but would love to hear your reasoning for substrate in one. Or is it just to hold plants down? If you want live plants in a Q tank, you could always do java fern or anubias tied with thread to rocks or other decor...
Good point. You could always try black then. That always makes colors pop instead of making your tank look super bright.

You can also use floating plants if you go bare bottom.

The main reason I suggested substrate was for the plants. Also dark substrate provide a dimmer environment creating a more relaxed area for the fish. Without a substrate light reflects off of glass. With white sand...well its even worse...this is another main reason. These are the only two main plusses I can think of. With a bright new environment...fish can be stressed. Dimmer substrate will help this. ESPECIALLY black.

The substrate will give you more option on what plants you can have as well.

---


Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
A Basic Approach to the Natural Planted Aquarium—Part One



Substrate: Options for the substrate include aquarium or landscape decorative gravel, sand, soil covered by a layer of fine gravel, or one of the specific plant substrates. Plants will grow in any of these, but some are less risky than others; I currently have tanks using all of those mentioned except for soil, and as soil can cause significant issues I do not recommend it if this is your first planted tank.

Regular (inert) aquarium gravel is preferred by the majority of planted tank authors. Particle size is important. If too large, water will pass through too easily, removing nutrients from the plant roots, and debris may collect and decompose. If too fine, the substrate may compact, preventing adequate movement of oxygen and nutrients and damaging the roots of the plants; this is the danger with sand, and if sand is used the depth of the substrate should not be more than 2 or 2.5 inches. A gravel particle size of 1 to 2 millimetres is best; it provides good anchorage for plant roots and it encourages good aerobic and anaerobic bacteria colonies with less chance of compacting. It should not exceed 4 or 5 inches, and this can be restricted to those rear areas where plants like the larger Echinodorus (swords) with more extensive root systems will be planted.

Choose a natural or dark colour; not only will the plants look better, so will the fish. Most of the fish in planted tanks are “forest fish” that occur in habitats having a dark substrate and dim light, and they will both feel “at home” and display their best colouration in such an environment. A white or "bright" substrate will cause many fish stress.

Enriched substrates can sometimes benefit, but are useless with respect to plants that are not substrate rooted. Floating plants, most stem plants, and plants that affix their roots to wood and rock will not benefit from nutrients in the substrate. Substrate-rooted plants such as Echinodorus (swords), Cryptocoryne (crypts), Aponogeton, Vallisneria, Sagitarria, etc., will benefit and show somewhat faster growth, but since all nutrients must be dissolved in the water before they can be assimilated by roots, this is not essential. With plain gravel or sand, substrate fertilization in the form of tablets or sticks is useful for heavy feeders like Echinodorus and Cryptocoryne, but even this is not mandatory for healthy, lush plants.
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...um-part-34861/

Last edited by Termato; 03-29-2012 at 04:03 PM..
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:48 PM   #20
 
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Hey guys, just wanted to add a little tip about QT. Always make sure the tank fits the fish. I'm going to be adding another goldfish to my school and will need to QT it because I don't have a reliable dealer anywhere near, but I can't use a regular 10 gal tank simply because it's very hard to keep a goldfish in one (swimming room, waste, ect). I have secured a 30 gal tub to use. It will be large enough to easily hold a goldfish for the extended period of quarantine. This doesn't apply to small schooling fish that could normally be housed in a 10 gal, but for something like the larger cichlids or catfish, this is going to have a large effect on the fish. Too small of an environment will stress the fish. And we all know stress = disease.

You guys have already made wonderful points about plants and cover, but I wouldn't use live plants as a lot of medications affect live plants, too. Fake plants provide the same cover, but without the worry of having to remove them if medications are need to be used.
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