Dips, Pre-treatment for new fish for disease control
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Dips, Pre-treatment for new fish for disease control

This is a discussion on Dips, Pre-treatment for new fish for disease control within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I keep bettas and as most know they are often kept in dirty cups. If the water is changed it's often with poor husbandry ...

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Dips, Pre-treatment for new fish for disease control
Old 05-19-2013, 08:16 PM   #1
 
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Dips, Pre-treatment for new fish for disease control

I keep bettas and as most know they are often kept in dirty cups. If the water is changed it's often with poor husbandry habits. One example would be what I saw at my local Petsmart where the water change consists of dumping the betta into the dirty water that is being discarded and partly filling a cup with cleaning chasing the betta around the dirty water, cupping dumping off most of the dirty water and dumping it in a cup with clean water. Not great for the betta, lots of stress and potential to be sick.

I don't put my fish in the same tanks most are all in their own 5 gallon heated tanks with sponge filters. However, I still would like to "pre-treat" them to increase their chances to staying well. I've read Methylene blue is good pre-treatment dip to knock out some diseases. The bottle I have say it should be 10 seconds. I have given my most recent additions prazipro to try rid them of potential parasites.

Please let me know what your "intake" pre-treat procedure is as if you expected the fish to be in contact with other fish. My multiple tanks are really close together. I try to be careful not to drip but it could always happen.
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Old 05-20-2013, 07:19 AM   #2
 
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Since your fish each have their own tanks, those tanks are essentially quarantine tanks. Choosing healthy looking specimens and keeping an eye on them seems the best course of action. You can always treat at the first sign of trouble. If you're concerned with dripping, you could place a strip of plastic sheeting over your tanks during maintenance. I just worry about a situation where the treatment is worse than the ailment.
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Old 05-20-2013, 07:32 AM   #3
 
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I agree, only treat when needed. Medications themselves cause stress, and can make things worse rather than better. All Betta's are treated poorly, even the 'imported' ones people pay an arm and a leg for. Even a local breeder can be hit or miss, too often people try out breeding without having proper conditions for grow out (especially with Bettas who need their own tanks).

Quarantine is the better choice, and a comfortable quarantine at that meaning live plants and all. Minimize stress, minimize disease.
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:14 PM   #4
 
+2 - For what It's worth, I don't like using medicines unless I can identify a specific disease. I quarantine if/when I can but I also agree to being picky when selecting fish. When I do buy fish (not that often really) if all the fish in the tank don't look very healthy, none of them are coming home with me.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:28 PM   #5
 
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Unless you are dealing with wild caught fish there's no reason for prophylactic medication. With wild caught fish a worming procedure is followed for some species, this would not apply to store bought splendens. The best thing you could provide is really clean water and the best diet available, as well as an aquarium set up with their comfort in mind.

As far as quar with new fish, don't quar them in the same room, much less tanks that are close to each other. Although the fish may appear healthy it may be carrying something that to the eye can not be seen. A breeder who had 100+ tanks running & pulled off a quar in his fishroom is what got me back into breeding angels late last fall. Fish he got in brought something really nasty with them, 100 tanks bubbling with sponge filters spread this to every tank, his whole basement, all wiped out in under a week. He didn't have time to set up quar tanks in his garage, a handful of fish wiped out 10k fish & years of work. Bubbling tanks, water droplets, circulation fans, they all got hit.

I used to pick up 400-500 angels at a time from him, didn't even make a dent in his stock. I've always kept a pair & potential breeders around in the event something like this happened, lots of hustling to get my room back up to breeding & producing, thankfully I kept all my gear after taking a couple years break. Hectic, but fun, though I hate to have to be pushed back into breeding by a horrible situation such as that.

If it can happen to someone with 100 tanks it can happen to someone with a handful. I've got a few beat up sturdy nightstands outside the fishroom that will easily hold a 20 gallon tank each, spare filters running, heaters, pumps, all for quar purposes. Always work the quar tanks last, wash & dry your hands well, wait a few hours before considering doing anything with any other tanks. Keep all gear specific to the quar tank(s) and everything as separate as your situation allows. It's wise to know your supplier as well, at this point I only buy fish if I know the breeder, there are so many nasty things going around the commercial fish farms that you may never be able to track down what it is until it's way too late.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:54 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jadaBlu View Post
.

Please let me know what your "intake" pre-treat procedure is as if you expected the fish to be in contact with other fish. My multiple tanks are really close together. I try to be careful not to drip but it could always happen.
Every new fish I get spends about 6 weeks in quarantine. The first 2 weeks they receive a heat treatment of 88 degrees to make sure they are not carrying ich. After a reprieve, they get a prazipro treatment. From there, I just observe them for a few weeks.

While not very popular here, there are many people who choose to follow such procedures and maximize their quarantine efforts.


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Old 05-22-2013, 07:20 AM   #7
 
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Should be no need for removing fish from the tank for proper maint, and is quite stressful for the fish.
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:31 AM   #8
 
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Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
Should be no need for removing fish from the tank for proper maint, and is quite stressful for the fish.
I agree, but I didn't see that mentioned in this thread - saw it mentioned in another thread though....
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:05 AM   #9
 
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OOp's, my apologies.I should read more carefully.
Thought OP was describing how they cleaned the fishes quarter's.
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:18 AM   #10
 
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Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
OOp's, my apologies.I should read more carefully.
Thought OP was describing how they cleaned the fishes quarter's.
Sounded to me that they were considering individual fish.
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