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Deku's questions~!

This is a discussion on Deku's questions~! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Top Fin is Petsmart's brand name for fish-related stuff. I'm pretty sure Petco's store-brand gravel is just called "Petco Aquarium Gravel" or something. I've ...

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Old 08-25-2008, 10:05 PM   #21
 
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Top Fin is Petsmart's brand name for fish-related stuff. I'm pretty sure Petco's store-brand gravel is just called "Petco Aquarium Gravel" or something.

I've heard reports of people saying that both store brands of gravel leeching color into their water and fish subsequently dying. A natural colored gravel will avoid this problem, as would a more expensive substrate like Eco-complete.
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Old 08-25-2008, 10:16 PM   #22
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman
Top Fin is Petsmart's brand name for fish-related stuff. I'm pretty sure Petco's store-brand gravel is just called "Petco Aquarium Gravel" or something.

I've heard reports of people saying that both store brands of gravel leeching color into their water and fish subsequently dying. A natural colored gravel will avoid this problem, as would a more expensive substrate like Eco-complete.
but glass catfish can be seen better in darker places
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Old 08-26-2008, 12:18 AM   #23
 
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wat kind of fish or invertebrates do you suggest would do better in a ten gallon setup? i have a "sunken ship" decor that acts as a large hidding place xD idk what to put in there that might look good with the decor and everything
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Old 08-26-2008, 12:52 AM   #24
 
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Well, what sort of fish are you interested in? Even in a tank as small as ten gallons, there are tons of options. It might be helpful to come up with a type of tank that you'd like to have.

Do you want small schools of peaceful fish, or a smaller number of larger fish?

You could come up with types of fish that you like, then select a particular species from that type that will work in your tank. Here are some broad categories, courtesy of our own Freshwater Species & Compatibility section:

Anabantids: This includes bettas, gouramis, and some more exotic fish like bushfish. Many of these will work in a 10g, but many get much too big.

Ancient fish: There are tons of different fish that qualify as ancient fish, but most of them get to be fairly large in size. The only ones that you could really have in a 10g would be some of the smaller puffer species, like the dwarf puffer (3 would be good) or a single red eye puffer.

Brackish fish: There aren't many common brackish species that stay small enough to work in a 10g tank. The only one I can think of is the bumblebee goby and possibly the Indian mudskipper, although you'd need a specialized setup for the mudskipper.

Catfish: I replied to another thread of yours about catfish species that stay small enough to be kept in a 10g tank.

Characins: This includes all of the different types of tetras, many of which stay small enough to be in a 10g tank. All of them are schooling fish, though, so you'd need an appropriate sized school, which would limit what else you could have in the tank. This group also includes pencilfish, some of which also stay small enough for a 10g. There are many characins that get too large for a 10g, though.

Cichlids: There are tons of different species of cichlids, but few that stay small enough to work in a 10g tank. You might be able to put a single dwarf cichlid, such as a ram, apistogramma, kribensis or possibly even a jewel cichlid in a 10g tank. You could also do a pair of the smaller shelldweller cichlids from Africa, although these fish are harder to find, more expensive, and generally not well suited for beginners. Most cichlids are aggressive fish, so even of the species I listed, you will be limited in what other fish you can put with them.

Cyprinids and Atherinids: this is a diverse group, so I'll break it down into sub-groups:
Barbs: many barbs get too large for a 10g. Most need to be in schools, like tetras, but can be meaner than tetras and will limit what you can keep with them. For a tank that small, cherry barbs might work well.
Danios: these are active schooling fish. They are basically minnows, but there are many types and they can be very attractive. You can't do something like giant danios in a 10g, but danios the size of zebra danios would work.
Gold fish: no goldfish would work in a 10g, as they get too big.
Killifish: most types of killies would do just fine in a 10g tank, but they can be difficult to find for sale
Loaches: the only loaches that would really work in a 10g are kuhli loaches, and they need to be in a group to thrive
Rainbowfish: even though some can be small, rainbowfish are fast moving and need schools so none of them are really appropriate for a 10g
Rasboras: rasboras are similar to danios. There are several types that would work well for you. Harlequin, dwarf, or galaxy rasboras would all be fine.

Invertebrates: crabs and crayfish are pretty much a no-go if you want to have fish in the tank. There are a lot of different options for shrimp that would work well, like amano, ghost and cherry shrimp. Mystery snails and Malaysian Trumpet Snails are good snails to have in your tank, but they do produce waste so you can't think of them just as something that cleans up after your fish.

Livebearers: this group includes guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies and a few other more uncommon types. Swordtails and mollies get a little too big for a 10g tank, but platies and guppies are a good choice. Keep in mind that if you have both males and females they'll reproduce like crazy. Often females you bring home from the store are already pregnant and can keep giving birth for months. Get all males if you want to avoid them reproducing.
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:02 AM   #25
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman
Well, what sort of fish are you interested in? Even in a tank as small as ten gallons, there are tons of options. It might be helpful to come up with a type of tank that you'd like to have.

Do you want small schools of peaceful fish, or a smaller number of larger fish?

You could come up with types of fish that you like, then select a particular species from that type that will work in your tank. Here are some broad categories, courtesy of our own Freshwater Species & Compatibility section:

Anabantids: This includes bettas, gouramis, and some more exotic fish like bushfish. Many of these will work in a 10g, but many get much too big.

Ancient fish: There are tons of different fish that qualify as ancient fish, but most of them get to be fairly large in size. The only ones that you could really have in a 10g would be some of the smaller puffer species, like the dwarf puffer (3 would be good) or a single red eye puffer.

Brackish fish: There aren't many common brackish species that stay small enough to work in a 10g tank. The only one I can think of is the bumblebee goby and possibly the Indian mudskipper, although you'd need a specialized setup for the mudskipper.

Catfish: I replied to another thread of yours about catfish species that stay small enough to be kept in a 10g tank.

Characins: This includes all of the different types of tetras, many of which stay small enough to be in a 10g tank. All of them are schooling fish, though, so you'd need an appropriate sized school, which would limit what else you could have in the tank. This group also includes pencilfish, some of which also stay small enough for a 10g. There are many characins that get too large for a 10g, though.

Cichlids: There are tons of different species of cichlids, but few that stay small enough to work in a 10g tank. You might be able to put a single dwarf cichlid, such as a ram, apistogramma, kribensis or possibly even a jewel cichlid in a 10g tank. You could also do a pair of the smaller shelldweller cichlids from Africa, although these fish are harder to find, more expensive, and generally not well suited for beginners. Most cichlids are aggressive fish, so even of the species I listed, you will be limited in what other fish you can put with them.

Cyprinids and Atherinids: this is a diverse group, so I'll break it down into sub-groups:
Barbs: many barbs get too large for a 10g. Most need to be in schools, like tetras, but can be meaner than tetras and will limit what you can keep with them. For a tank that small, cherry barbs might work well.
Danios: these are active schooling fish. They are basically minnows, but there are many types and they can be very attractive. You can't do something like giant danios in a 10g, but danios the size of zebra danios would work.
Gold fish: no goldfish would work in a 10g, as they get too big.
Killifish: most types of killies would do just fine in a 10g tank, but they can be difficult to find for sale
Loaches: the only loaches that would really work in a 10g are kuhli loaches, and they need to be in a group to thrive
Rainbowfish: even though some can be small, rainbowfish are fast moving and need schools so none of them are really appropriate for a 10g
Rasboras: rasboras are similar to danios. There are several types that would work well for you. Harlequin, dwarf, or galaxy rasboras would all be fine.

Invertebrates: crabs and crayfish are pretty much a no-go if you want to have fish in the tank. There are a lot of different options for shrimp that would work well, like amano, ghost and cherry shrimp. Mystery snails and Malaysian Trumpet Snails are good snails to have in your tank, but they do produce waste so you can't think of them just as something that cleans up after your fish.

Livebearers: this group includes guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies and a few other more uncommon types. Swordtails and mollies get a little too big for a 10g tank, but platies and guppies are a good choice. Keep in mind that if you have both males and females they'll reproduce like crazy. Often females you bring home from the store are already pregnant and can keep giving birth for months. Get all males if you want to avoid them reproducing.
well i dont mind if its a one species tank like you know just that fish or crab well i ussually find predatory fish awesome xD i like fish that when you go up to the tank to see em if their hidding theyll pop their head out to great you xD hmmm i like strange looking fish something out of the ordinary xD like i saw a fish called a frogfish and my friend was like wat the heck is that!? xD so i answered him xD i like things that shock people xD if its a school of fish id rather skip the neons....their too common for me ><
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:27 AM   #26
 
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well in all honesty...i like fish with big mouths... xD sometimes spikes....like on their back like a pufferfish would have XD or sometimes i like fat fish xD like you know the shape of a ball xD umm lemme see i like active fish...i also like predatory fish....xD i like interactive fish as in responsive
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:40 AM   #27
 
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Well puffers seem to fit all of those criteria. They're round, they're aggressive, and they're predatory.

The two best options for puffers in a 10g tank are:

Dwarf puffers: they get to about 1 inch, and you could put three of them in the tank, but you can't keep other fish with them. They are territorial, so you have to have a lot of caves, rocks, driftwood, and plants to break up their lines of sight so they stay away from each other. They will not eat any sort of flake, pellet, or freeze dried food. They may not even eat frozen food such as frozen bloodworms or brine shrimp. The biggest part of their diet should be live snails. I feed mine live snails, live blackworms, and occasionally they'll eat frozen brine shrimp, bloodworms and mysis shrimp. They can be sensitive to water conditions so can't add them to the tank until it has fully cycled.

Red eye puffers: these get a little larger, around 2.5 inches, so you can really only have one in a 10g tank. They eat the same foods as the dwarf puffer.

Puffers are messy eaters so you need to have good filtration on the tank. Puffers are also very interactive fish, and will follow you around the room looking at you. They also get really excited at meal times. Their eyes can move around independently, like a chameleon. It's really fun to watch them stalk their prey and then attack them ferociously. Most of all, puffers are really, really cute.
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:43 AM   #28
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman
Well puffers seem to fit all of those criteria. They're round, they're aggressive, and they're predatory.

The two best options for puffers in a 10g tank are:

Dwarf puffers: they get to about 1 inch, and you could put three of them in the tank, but you can't keep other fish with them. They are territorial, so you have to have a lot of caves, rocks, driftwood, and plants to break up their lines of sight so they stay away from each other. They will not eat any sort of flake, pellet, or freeze dried food. They may not even eat frozen food such as frozen bloodworms or brine shrimp. The biggest part of their diet should be live snails. I feed mine live snails, live blackworms, and occasionally they'll eat frozen brine shrimp, bloodworms and mysis shrimp. They can be sensitive to water conditions so can't add them to the tank until it has fully cycled.

Red eye puffers: these get a little larger, around 2.5 inches, so you can really only have one in a 10g tank. They eat the same foods as the dwarf puffer.

Puffers are messy eaters so you need to have good filtration on the tank. Puffers are also very interactive fish, and will follow you around the room looking at you. They also get really excited at meal times. Their eyes can move around independently, like a chameleon. It's really fun to watch them stalk their prey and then attack them ferociously. Most of all, puffers are really, really cute.
but idk what pet store sells em
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:52 AM   #29
 
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I, personally, haven't seen red eye puffers for sale at a store. You can get them on the internet, though. Also, if you have a good LFS (local fish store) they might be able to special order you one.

The dwarf puffers are much more common. I see them at most LFS's. They even had them at a Petsmart, but they didn't seem to get any new ones after I bought the last three they had, so Petsmart might be phasing them out, or something. They also go by the name Pea Puffer and Indian Dwarf Puffer, if that helps. They can also be found for sale online very easily.
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:56 AM   #30
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman
I, personally, haven't seen red eye puffers for sale at a store. You can get them on the internet, though. Also, if you have a good LFS (local fish store) they might be able to special order you one.

The dwarf puffers are much more common. I see them at most LFS's. They even had them at a Petsmart, but they didn't seem to get any new ones after I bought the last three they had, so Petsmart might be phasing them out, or something. They also go by the name Pea Puffer and Indian Dwarf Puffer, if that helps. They can also be found for sale online very easily.
i dont trust online xD well is there anything that looks like a piranha? i like pacus...though they grow too big... i also like silver dollars...
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