Cyanobacteria in the freshwater planted aquarium - Page 9 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #81 of 104 Old 04-27-2013, 11:39 AM
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I would not use any chemicals or antibiotics.

Look at this point you

1) ran 24/7 lighting

2) got a cyano bloom

3) killed the lights

4) system got better

5) cyano came back with lights.

so you have lights with cyano no lights no cyano.

now all you have to do is adjust the lights (less) so the cyano dies off (again) and does not come back.

PS sometimes it takes 2 times but the key is adjusting the lighting and feeding.

my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #82 of 104 Old 04-29-2013, 02:12 AM
went back and removed as much as possible by hand again. My 20gal is about to finish its cycle, nitrites are finally falling and ammonia at a steady zero. I think my 6 may be a little over stocked with 6 black phantoms. I plan to add a few neons after this in hopes to keep waste lower. I am gonna just stay on top of the cleaning and hopefully can have some good news to report one of these days. After much thinking about it i agree that learning to rid it naturally should be my plan of action. Whether it was transfered to my tank on plants or spawned bc of the excessive light i provided that one weekend, i need to learn the right way to rid it bc i am not going to tear down any time something annoying happens. I appreciate everything you have all contributed to helping me resolve this problem. As far as testing my water to keep it clean, would you recommend any other tests other than the 4 that come in the API "master kit" (Ammonia, nitrite,nitrate, and pH)?
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post #83 of 104 Old 04-29-2013, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by xfatdannx View Post
went back and removed as much as possible by hand again. My 20gal is about to finish its cycle, nitrites are finally falling and ammonia at a steady zero. I think my 6 may be a little over stocked with 6 black phantoms. I plan to add a few neons after this in hopes to keep waste lower. I am gonna just stay on top of the cleaning and hopefully can have some good news to report one of these days. After much thinking about it i agree that learning to rid it naturally should be my plan of action.
I tend to be succint (rude, blunt, short whatever ) as I try to keep it simple. We had one very advanced reef keeper with a 75g tank with fast growing sps (hard to keep) corals. Who had cyano. His first reaction was it couldn't be as simple as killing the lights. And it worked but the first time it came back. But after the second time and withfollowon reduced lighting it has stayed away for years.

I think your attitude to go natural as opposed to adding mechanicals or chemicals is really good. Keep us posted.

Quote:
Whether it was transfered to my tank on plants or spawned bc of the excessive light i provided that one weekend, i need to learn the right way to rid it bc i am not going to tear down any time something annoying happens. I appreciate everything you have all contributed to helping me resolve this problem. As far as testing my water to keep it clean, would you recommend any other tests other than the 4 that come in the API "master kit" (Ammonia, nitrite,nitrate, and pH)?
I would recommend the api kh and gh kits which can bought as a set for $10-12 or so. I found that kh and gh both rose to high values over years and neons did not do very well. With peat moss in the substrate I found that kh stayed at 4 degrees and gh at 9 degrees for over two years and neons thrived.

So I do value kh and gh not so much for what the actual values are but whether or not they remain at some constant level or slowly increase.


my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #84 of 104 Old 04-29-2013, 11:32 AM
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The only test I mess with is pH and this rarely, and even more rarely the nitrate. But after many years, with constant values maintained by my methods, I don't have to worry anyway.

The goal is or should be to obtain a balanced stable environment, and while that can be tricky initially, during the first few months as things are settling, it should be achieved. Adhering to a few basic "rules" ensures it will remain.

But even then, these bouts of cyano, or some type of algae, can occur. We are dealing with nature, even though in a very artificial and closed system. Keep in mind that any change to any part of this complex system is likely to have far-reaching consequences in the system.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #85 of 104 Old 04-30-2013, 07:38 AM
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Byron,

I am having a Cyano bloom too. Could you give the details of the balance of the planted tank that is necessary for a healthy tank, or if you have it in your articles, give me a pointer? The Cyano seems to have got more robust in the last week. I'm finding that I have to physically remove the Cyano every other day to keep it in check. This is the only thing I am doing, plus 50% water change when I physically remove it using a clear vinyl tube. I'm reasonably sure that my lights are too bright. I would like very much to bring the tank into a good balance. Trouble is I don't know what to change, except maybe the lighting.

I'm doing a water change today so I will deep vac the gravel.

Thanks a lot, Byron.

Steven

Last edited by equatics; 04-30-2013 at 07:54 AM.
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post #86 of 104 Old 04-30-2013, 07:58 AM
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Question

Byron,

I am having a Cyano bloom too. Could you give me a refresher on the details of the balance of the planted tank that is necessary for a healthy tank, or if you have it in your articles, give me a pointer? The Cyano seems to have got more robust in the last week. Thanks.

Steven
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post #87 of 104 Old 04-30-2013, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Nemo the Clownfish View Post
Byron,

I am having a Cyano bloom too. Could you give the details of the balance of the planted tank that is necessary for a healthy tank, or if you have it in your articles, give me a pointer? The Cyano seems to have got more robust in the last week. I'm finding that I have to physically remove the Cyano every other day to keep it in check. This is the only thing I am doing, plus 50% water change when I physically remove it using a clear vinyl tube. I'm reasonably sure that my lights are too bright. I would like very much to bring the tank into a good balance. Trouble is I don't know what to change, except maybe the lighting.

I'm doing a water change today so I will deep vac the gravel.

Thanks a lot, Byron.

Steven
Steven, was there a thread on this somewhere? If so, can you give us the link? Sounds familiar.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #88 of 104 Old 05-01-2013, 12:22 AM
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Here's a post I found but I will look some more because it doesn't give the details.

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...9/#post1424066
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post #89 of 104 Old 05-01-2013, 02:06 AM
So going back to the "organics" causing and feeding cyano. Could that be from an over stocked tank? I've been talking about moving my current fish to a larger tank, could getting a smaller amount of fish with less waste help curb the cyano?
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post #90 of 104 Old 05-01-2013, 05:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nemo the Clownfish View Post
Byron,

I am having a Cyano bloom too. Could you give me a refresher on the details of the balance of the planted tank that is necessary for a healthy tank, or if you have it in your articles, give me a pointer? The Cyano seems to have got more robust in the last week. Thanks.

Steven
Another voice heard from...This was copied from "another board"

"Blue Green Algae, BGA








Description





This isn't a true algae, but a bacteria called cyanobacteria that is able to photosynthesise. Covers everything in a blue/green slimy mat. Easily peels off but grows back again very quickly. It can smell pretty foul. It is very commonly found in the substrate and especially along the front glass where is receives light.





Cause




Often caused by very low nitrates. It is fairly common to have it growing in the substrate against the front glass from where it can spread. Sometimes it appears with new setups that have had light and ammonia present at some point. Dirty substrates and filters may also bring it on. Poor water circulation is another possible cause."
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