Creating a moonlight effect - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #11 of 12 Old 03-10-2011, 09:54 AM
I am curious where the moon comes into that theory bryon? Obviously the moon waxes and wanes. A full moon though can be quite bright. One must also look at the light hitting the plant. Moonlights(blue) LED or CC are not full spectrum and use only a few watts.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-10-2011, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
I am curious where the moon comes into that theory bryon? Obviously the moon waxes and wanes. A full moon though can be quite bright. One must also look at the light hitting the plant. Moonlights(blue) LED or CC are not full spectrum and use only a few watts.
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In a majority of the forest streams, moonlight never gets to the water due to the overhanging canopy. Same as sunlight rarely directly hits the streams. Which is perhaps why most of the streams have no aquatic plants, only marginal vegetation extending into the water. Many of our "aquarium plants" are actually marsh or bog plants (the Echinodorus, Cryptocoryne, Anubias, Java Fern, and others) that spend half the year submersed, the other half emersed. But many of these are also under a canopy of overhanging trees and vegetation. Also, moonlight (unlike sunlight) is much more irregular, it is not there every night.

The other thing one must remember about aquarium lighting is that it is, even at its best, far removed from nature. Many botanists have pointed out that our aquarium plants are subjected to "ideal" conditions in the aquarium that they would never see in nature. We do this to promote faster growth, so the light is going to be more direct and much more constant than it normally is in their habitat. Same with water parameters, both temperature and pH. I suspect the plant's natural growing cycles reflect all this.

I am actually more concerned with fish than plants, and reducing stress on the fish as much as possible.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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