corydoras keep dieing. please help - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 18 Old 10-03-2012, 11:37 AM
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yes i believe i am acclimating them properly. i let the bag sit on top for about 1/2 hour. the slowly mix some tank water in the bag over another 1/2 hour. the first set i for from my lfs, the next got from online(as i did my other fish). and the last set i also got from my lfs

Hmmmm......do you use aquarium salt? I heard this is no good for cories.
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post #12 of 18 Old 10-03-2012, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
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no, ive never used it
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post #13 of 18 Old 10-03-2012, 12:36 PM
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i do have a about 20 plants in there(4 different kinds). i use the api liquid test kit and i also purchased the mardel strip test kit just to see if my kit was wrong. i really have no way of keeping the temp down on the tank, ive had this problem all summer it was about 81-85. now that it isnt as hot outside it will be easier as long as the room stays cooler. with that gel food i use alot of it does fall to the sand which the cories hop right on it.
If temps are as reported,, I would consider Sterbai corydoras who tolerate the heat much better than most other's.
Have kept sterbai corydoras with Discus at temp's between 80 and 84 degrees F without issues.
Considering no other fishes are Dying? the temp would be my most likely concern.
Shrimp pellet's,New life spectrum pellet's,Ocean nutrition's formula II Marine pellet's, and occasional blood worm's (twice a month) are enjoyed by many of the cory's I have kept/am keeping.
Would also note that sharp substrates and or deco,r such as lava rock can sometimes cause skin irritation,barbel damage and lead to secondary infections.
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The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #14 of 18 Old 10-03-2012, 02:42 PM
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I agree with what other members have suggested. But clearly something is happenineg that you/we are not picking up on.

Temperature is important, but I cannot believe that you would have so many dead corys/brochis [the "emerald" may be Brochis splendens?] even from the fluctuations you mention, and certainly not from a temp around 79F. Long term the temp could be less, I agree, but the rapid demise of so many is something else. I have over 30 corys of various species including panda in my 115g which is a constant 77-78F and rises to 80F during heat spells, and I have never seen any ill effects in many years.

Second point is the food. Bloodworms should not be fed more than once a week, at most twice. So if these are in the mix, I would feed it once a week as a treat. Corys can and should be weaned onto prepared foods, and these must be sinking foods like tablets, sticks, pellets, disks. I have never seen corys showing much interest in flake foods that may sink to the substrate. A variety of 3-4 sinking foods is best. One that I have found all corys, including my many wild-caught fish, really go after is the shrimp pellets made by Omega One and Wardley. Also the Nutrafin tablets, for some reason these send them into a feeding frenzy. A third should be plant-based, like one of the spirulina/kelp disks made by Omega One or Hikari.

Third, have you ever noticed any form of bullying from any of the other fish? This sometimes means sitting motionless in front of the tank for an hour or more, so the fish forget you are there and behave normally. This is not as silly as it sounds. First, fish will associate you with food, so you being there moving about is going to keep them expecting food. Second, your movement distracts them from their natural behaviours which is what you want to observe. Look for any fish charging, poking, bumping, shoving, pushing or nipping fins of any of the corys; and, in reverse, do the corys swim away from any particular fish that may swim toward them? Either can be tell-tale of bullying. The Siamese Algae Eater can be somewhat aggressive, and this could occur at night too; depending which species you have, some are worse than others for this, the Chinese Algae Eater is often a real terror to substrate fish.

On the substrate, you say it is sand, so that should be OK; is it plain sand, or a plant-type substrate? In my experience, substrate issues usually manifest themselves in barbel degeneration, perhaps with blood patches around the mouth area.

The pH shouldn't be problematic; do you know the GH?

The panda cory for some reason is not an easy fish, in spite of the fact that most available are now tank/commercially raised. But it retains its high sensitivity to any water issues; even wild fish of other species settle in better. The Corydoras aeneus is much hardier, though not indestructible if something in the water is off.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 18 Old 10-04-2012, 05:38 AM
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I agree with much of what Byron spea'ks of with exception of temperatures for species mentioned.
I asked about other possible dead fishes, for it is within reason that other fishes may have brought pathogen/parasite to the tank, or died,, and were then eaten by bottom feeder's such as the cory's and thus the cory's became sick.

My suggestion with respect to particular food.."Ocean nutrition's Formula II Marine pellet" was chosen for it's soft palatable properties, as well as seafood's,spirulina, and Garlic.
The Garlic is not particularly well received by many freshwater intestinal parasites and other content is good food for these fish.

I understand seasonal and or daily temp fluctuation's (heat from light's /window's) but my expieriences, as well as suggested temp's for these fishes,, Planet catfish.com..Seriouslyfish.com indicate that at higher temp's than 76 degree's F ,the metabolosim's speed up and fish may or may not live as long as they might at cooler temp's.(easy to test if one is inclined)
I seldom keep these fish at temperatures above 75 degree's F and longevity seem's to be my,and other's reward
Sites I mentioned above suggest 79 degree's F as upper range for many/most species of the corydoras and I believe that keeping them in closer to middle or lower range day in, and day out, is less stessful for the fish.
Opinion's vary.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.

Last edited by 1077; 10-04-2012 at 05:47 AM.
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post #16 of 18 Old 10-04-2012, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
I agree with much of what Byron spea'ks of with exception of temperatures for species mentioned.
I asked about other possible dead fishes, for it is within reason that other fishes may have brought pathogen/parasite to the tank, or died,, and were then eaten by bottom feeder's such as the cory's and thus the cory's became sick.

My suggestion with respect to particular food.."Ocean nutrition's Formula II Marine pellet" was chosen for it's soft palatable properties, as well as seafood's,spirulina, and Garlic.
The Garlic is not particularly well received by many freshwater intestinal parasites and other content is good food for these fish.

I understand seasonal and or daily temp fluctuation's (heat from light's /window's) but my expieriences, as well as suggested temp's for these fishes,, Planet catfish.com..Seriouslyfish.com indicate that at higher temp's than 76 degree's F ,the metabolosim's speed up and fish may or may not live as long as they might at cooler temp's.(easy to test if one is inclined)
I seldom keep these fish at temperatures above 75 degree's F and longevity seem's to be my,and other's reward
Sites I mentioned above suggest 79 degree's F as upper range for many/most species of the corydoras and I believe that keeping them in closer to middle or lower range day in, and day out, is less stessful for the fish.
Opinion's vary.
I agree on all this, just for the record. The temp may add stress in this situation, but is unlikely to cause rapid demise.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 18 Old 10-05-2012, 05:18 AM
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Was unclear to me from original post at what rate these fish were being lost.
Some it appear's were lost over a period of month's according to OP and last batch expired in a matter of day's.
Temps could play a part over a period of month's, but rapid decline and loss over a week would maybe not lend itself to temperature related problems as Byron has pointed out.
When in doubt.increasing size and frequency of water changes can't hurt.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #18 of 18 Old 10-05-2012, 05:51 AM Thread Starter
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Was unclear to me from original post at what rate these fish were being lost.
Some it appear's were lost over a period of month's according to OP and last batch expired in a matter of day's.
Temps could play a part over a period of month's, but rapid decline and loss over a week would maybe not lend itself to temperature related problems as Byron has pointed out.
When in doubt.increasing size and frequency of water changes can't hurt.
In the beginning it was about 6 over 1 month. This last time was a matter of 1 week. The temp isn't really a problem anymore since its much coolser
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