Is this the correct? Water change etiquette? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
Is this the correct? Water change etiquette?

I usually change 10% every week. The "specialist" at the LFS said that's all I need with live plants. She never clarified how many plants would help the bioload, etc. Anyhow, after reading here, I've decided to do a larger water change. I usually, fill a five gallon bucket, treat it, heat it, and run it on a filter until I need the water for a change. Given what was explained to be about shocking and stressing the fish, this seemed the most logical approach. A different "specialist" said that was overkill for a little ten gallon tank.... which would feel the effects much more readily than a larger tank... to my reasoning. Anyhow, now i'm wondering, is it overkill to put pretreated and heated water in or would they not know the difference between that and treated fresh tap water?

Given that my plants moved, I plan on doing larger changes more often til my horwort arrives. How much is enough for ten gallons of hard, 7.5 PH, almost alkeline water?
TexasTanker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 04:07 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
Question Question # 2 Back Drop

I'm debating back drops for what my mother has deemed the "Goofy Texas Tank". My pallet o plants is in, I'm going to pick those up. So now it's time to debate back drop. I like the idea of reflective backing because it gives the illusion of more space. I'm not sure how that would set with the fishies though. My other thought was plain blue or black. Are any better than others? It is a tall tank and I use the area behind there as storage so I'd really rather not leave it open.
TexasTanker is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 06:51 PM
zof
Member
 
zof's Avatar
 
The best back drop is obvious..... a giant picture of the Alamo :D


ooooo and you could get one of those plastic six shooters from the toy section as decoration!!!


Sorry I couldn't resist.
zof is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 07:18 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTanker View Post
I usually change 10% every week. The "specialist" at the LFS said that's all I need with live plants. She never clarified how many plants would help the bioload, etc. Anyhow, after reading here, I've decided to do a larger water change. I usually, fill a five gallon bucket, treat it, heat it, and run it on a filter until I need the water for a change. Given what was explained to be about shocking and stressing the fish, this seemed the most logical approach. A different "specialist" said that was overkill for a little ten gallon tank.... which would feel the effects much more readily than a larger tank... to my reasoning. Anyhow, now i'm wondering, is it overkill to put pretreated and heated water in or would they not know the difference between that and treated fresh tap water?

Given that my plants moved, I plan on doing larger changes more often til my horwort arrives. How much is enough for ten gallons of hard, 7.5 PH, almost alkeline water?
On the heat, is there a reason you don't use water from the hot and cold taps to avoid having to heat the replacement water? I have always ran water straight from the taps into the tank at approximately the same temperature [a degree or two either way is not going to hurt most fish, but there are some exceptions]. I squirt in the conditioner as it starts to fill. But I have large tanks and need to use a Python, so this is the only way. As long as the parameters (pH and hardness) between the tank and tap water are reasonably close, this works fine.

The volume of the water change depends upon the needs of the system. The more and larger the fish, the more essential it is to change more water regularly, at least once a week. I have planted aquaria but I still do 50% water changes every week. With heavily planted tanks, and provided the fish load is minimal, fewer water changes are required. The fish determine these.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 07:43 PM
Member
 
tanker's Avatar
 
As for backdrops, I bought one that had black on one side and blue (graduating from very dark on the bottom to darkish on the top) on the other. I put both up and thought that the black made the tanks look smaller than the blue (I have 35 and 75 litre, approx 9 and 20 US gallons). The blue seemed to me to give more an illusion of depth than the black side.
tanker is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 07:58 PM
Member
 
JohnnyD44's Avatar
 
Good point made by Byron about the water changes and being dependent on the stocking and size of the stock in your tank.

I too have a planted tank, and I keep many smaller fish, and I'm not where near capacity, I do about a 30% water change every week. I too use the same method Byron, using a siphon to drain my tank and long tube, connected to my faucet and I temper the water as close as the human hand can tell....

As for the backdrop, I use to have the same blue backdrop as mentioned by tanker (weird we have two 'tanker's...haha)...and I noticed when I switched to my current black background I don't regret it for a minute. The black background with the darker colored gravel really, really make the green of the plants 'pop' so to speak and bring great contrast with the colors of the fish.

I would steer clear of any sort of "reflector" back ground, keep in mind most of the fish we keep come from streams and creeks/rivers, where it's naturally 'darker'...before I made the transformation to my planted aquaria, I had crystals and white gravel in my tank. It was very bright and I did some research found that my fish didn't care for it, so out it went.

What plants did you end up ordering? Have you thought about what lighting you're going to use??

“The space between the tears we cry is the laughter that keeps us coming back for more...."-- Dave Matthews
JohnnyD44 is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 08:00 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
On the heat, is there a reason you don't use water from the hot and cold taps to avoid having to heat the replacement water? I have always ran water straight from the taps into the tank at approximately the same temperature [a
I don't use water from the hot tap because I've seen the inside of a hot water heater up close and personal.... Its NASTY. My rule of thumb is that hot water is for bathing, not consuming. Perhaps it's an odd paranoia (read phobia) but I feel better knowing they're not swimming in it.
TexasTanker is offline  
post #8 of 21 Old 05-06-2010, 09:04 PM
New Member
 
FishFancy's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I squirt in the conditioner as it starts to fill. But I have large tanks and need to use a Python, so this is the only way. As long as the parameters (pH and hardness) between the tank and tap water are reasonably close, this works fine.

Byron.
Hi Byron, not to hijack a thread but I wanted to verify something, are you squirting the conditioner in the tank and then adding water straight from the tap to the tank with the python? no worries for chlorine? Just asking because I just inherited a 55 GAL (WhooHoo!) and water changes are a little bit of concern with me, I struggle with carrying 2 5-Gal buckets to clean the 26-gal tank I have (Sad I know, I am a wimp though).

FishFancy Lolly!
No fish were harmed in the cycling of this tank
FishFancy is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 05-07-2010, 08:16 AM
Member
 
JohnnyD44's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FishFancy View Post
Hi Byron, not to hijack a thread but I wanted to verify something, are you squirting the conditioner in the tank and then adding water straight from the tap to the tank with the python? no worries for chlorine? Just asking because I just inherited a 55 GAL (WhooHoo!) and water changes are a little bit of concern with me, I struggle with carrying 2 5-Gal buckets to clean the 26-gal tank I have (Sad I know, I am a wimp though).
thats exactly what I do....add the conditioner and then add the water right from the tap via plastic tubing screwed into the faucet....

“The space between the tears we cry is the laughter that keeps us coming back for more...."-- Dave Matthews
JohnnyD44 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to JohnnyD44 For This Useful Post:
FishFancy (05-07-2010)
post #10 of 21 Old 05-07-2010, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
What I do.... For the 55 Gallon. I have two 5 Gallon buckets under the tank in the cabinet. I use my hose to fill those. I treat that water, and keep a little filter in each. That way whenever I need to change water, It's ready. Then, when I change water I siphen out of the tank, directly out the window of the house (the dog loves it), Then I use a hose with a pump on it to pull the water from the two buckets into the tank. No lifting, no spillage.
TexasTanker is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heating water before water change.... bigk_54 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 7 02-12-2009 05:49 PM
White Cloudy Water + Dead Fish after water change HELP!!! eviltuna Tropical Fish Diseases 8 03-05-2008 12:03 AM
How much water change in 1 day? FishN00b Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 14 04-30-2007 04:23 AM
help cloudy water after water change angel62 Tropical Fish Diseases 5 02-22-2007 02:21 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome