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City water report - how to interpret?

This is a discussion on City water report - how to interpret? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> After going the heavily planted route, I'd like to try my hand at something like this: or this:...

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City water report - how to interpret?
Old 02-23-2012, 04:32 PM   #11
 
After going the heavily planted route, I'd like to try my hand at something like this:



or this:


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Old 02-23-2012, 07:33 PM   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurious View Post
After going the heavily planted route, I'd like to try my hand at something like this:



or this:


The photos did not make it.
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Old 02-23-2012, 07:53 PM   #13
 
Sorry about the above glitch. Here's a link to one of the Aquarium Design Group's videos of a hardscape tank:

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Old 02-23-2012, 08:27 PM   #14
 
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While i can appreciate the clean lines of the aquascape, I feel sorry for the fish that are subjected to it. That species is a barb, Oreichthys crenuchoides, that needs a well planted tank with very dim lighting and a dark substrate. If you don't want to take my word for it, here is a biologist's perspective.
Drape Fin Barb (Oreichthys crenuchoides) - Seriously Fish

According to the discoverer of this species, Oreichthys crenuchoides is known only from the Brahmaputra River drainage in northeast India. The type locality was a river approximately 5 metres wide, with slow-moving, clear water and a muddy substrate, and thick marginal vegetation among which the fish are found. This species is on the IUCN red list of threatened species, sadly.

That's the problem with some aquascapes, they may look nice, but one has to first consider the fish and provide what they need.
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:52 PM   #15
 
I appreciate your opinion, however I will not be stocking shy or endangered fish species in my next tank.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:05 AM   #16
 
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I appreciate your opinion, however I will not be stocking shy or endangered fish species in my next tank.
I couldn't resist that opportunity to make the point.

However, except perhaps for rift lake cichlids, I can't think of any fish that would suit a sparse and open environment. With a good cover of floating plants, and a dark substrate, this would nicely replicate many habitats. It is the white and bright light that is the problem for fish. What I'm thinking is along the lines of the attached which is sparse but authentic.
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File Type: jpg Amazon cardinal habitat.jpg (38.9 KB, 13 views)
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:28 PM   #17
 
Byron, what are your nice floating plants? I definitely will consider adding some (NOT duckweed) but don't want a type that can invade my tank and become problematic? Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-25-2012, 11:04 AM   #18
 
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Byron, what are your nice floating plants? I definitely will consider adding some (NOT duckweed) but don't want a type that can invade my tank and become problematic? Thanks in advance.
That photo isn't one of my tanks, by the way, just a good example I found somewhere of an authentic Amazonian aquascape for cardinals and similar forest fish. But, I do know the floating plants, they are Amazon Frogbit. I have this in my 70g flooded Amazon tank [photos under "Aquariums" below my name on the left] but it is 50/50 for me. I have my tanks fairly tightly covered, due to jumping hatchetfish primarily, and I understand this plant can do better with more air circulation such as with an open top tank. It goes through seasonal growth spurts for a couple months, even flowering, then it will die off to barely a couple of one-leaf plants for a couple months, then start back again.

The best floating plant bar none is Water Sprite. Once settled, it will expand across the tank if permitted, but it produces daughter plants on the leaves so frequently that you can remove these and discard the parent plant regularly as you see fit to maintain a cover from minimal to thick. I bought one plant in 1996 or 1997, and over successive generations I have it in most of my tanks and I chuck out plants every couple of weeks. Fish love this plant, the dangling roots collect microscopic plankton, many species spawn in it, fry can successfully hide in it...truly a wonderful plant. And with its fast growth it is excellent at removing toxins and nutrients, and releasing a lot of oxygen through the roots into the water.
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