changing filters?
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » changing filters?

changing filters?

This is a discussion on changing filters? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ok, so my tank is cycled and everything is so far so good, but im to the point where my filter has got to ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Chinese Algae Eater
Chinese Algae Eater
Oto Catfish
Oto Catfish
Reply
Old 01-19-2009, 07:49 PM   #1
 
changing filters?

ok, so my tank is cycled and everything is so far so good, but im to the point where my filter has got to be around 3 months old, and im suppose to change it once a month.

That being said, my filter is filter floss with carbon in it. Should i go ahead and change it or what? Should i put the filter in the tank for a day or 2 after i replace it or should i just replace it?

Also, how do canister filters work? I mean, where does the inlet for the water go? and where do you put the return?
Burninator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 10:47 PM   #2
 
Lupin's Avatar
 
If the filter media is already clogged with muck, then now is the time to clean it. You do not need to change the filter media unless it is already worn out. This is a case for filter floss, ceramic rings, sponges and other filter materials with a few exceptions.

Carbon is best kept in your cabinet until you want either tannins or meds removed from your tank. Carbon lasts only as long as six weeks and they're a complete waste IMO other than clarifying the water but I would never spend that much when I can do water changes and use finer filter materials to remove the fine particles responsible for clouding the water. Ditch that used carbon and just clean the filter media with tank water or dechlorinated tapwater.

The inlet of canister is submerged in the tank, similar with the outlets if that makes sense.
Lupin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 11:25 PM   #3
 
I think you kinda misunderstood.

Yes, the filter is clogged. HOWEVER, I have a tetra whisper 45. If you dont feel like looking it up, ill try and explain. My filter is like 2 filter floss pads sewn together with carbon between them. Theres no way for me take out the carbon.

I got this filter because i recognized the name tetra when i was starting out. However, in learning like everyone does, i realize i probably should have gone with a better system that allows me to use the sponge or floss.

So until i can afford a new one, im kinda stuck figuring this one out.
Burninator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 11:30 PM   #4
 
Lupin's Avatar
 
Do you have a pic of this filter? I've never tried this one but carbon is supposed to be replaceable so the carbon has to be removeable. I always think Tetra really sucks, let alone their food products and test kits.
Lupin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 11:37 PM   #5
 
well like i said, beginners mistake. If someone wants to buy this one off me or something then ill buy one i know is better. Until then, im kinda stuck with it. What can i say, i was excited to get started :)

filter
Tetra Whisper EX Filtration System at PETCO

filter media
Tetra Replacement Carbon Filters for EX Filtration Systems at PETCO
Burninator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 11:50 PM   #6
 
aunt kymmie's Avatar
 
The filter pads in my 6g have a slightly similar design. At water change time remove them, swoosh them around really well in the old tank water, and then replace back into your filter. Eventually it will get to the point where you have to replace them but you'll know when that time comes
aunt kymmie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2009, 10:53 PM   #7
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
You could always take a sharp knife or razorblade and cut open the filter pad along the top edge and dump that carbon out. Old carbon isn't doing anything for you and there is some speculation (albeit not very well backed up) that old carbon can cause hole-in-the-head disease. If you're going to continue using carbon, you need to replace it at least once a month. But, I'm with Lupin on this one - there's really no need for carbon unless you're removing meds or tannins.

But yes, like others have said, you don't need to replace the whole cartridge, just give it a good swirl in the water you remove during a water change and you should be good to go.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2009, 11:34 PM   #8
 
does it really matter if its old water or new water that has been conditioned for a while?

Also, im going to change filters to an emperor 400 so that i have a better filter and a better system. How should i go about doing this? Should i just run them both for a while or take the filter out of the old one and leave it in the tank and run the new one or what?
Burninator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2009, 02:33 AM   #9
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
I mean, you could swish it around in new, conditioned water, but then you'd get that water all dirty. If it's used tank water, it's already dirty and you were just going to throw it away anyway, right?

You can change filters by just adding the second one alongside the first and letting them both run for about a month. At that time you should be able to remove the old filter safely. However, why not run both at once? That way, you'll have an extra filter in case one breaks. Also, if you don't already have a hospital/quarantine tank, you can buy yourself a cheap tank (10g tanks are $11 at Petsmart) and when you need to treat or quarantine a fish, just move that Tetra filter over to the 10g, fill the tank with water, and presto, you've got a cycled filter and therefore a cycled tank.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2009, 11:01 AM   #10
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
I mean, you could swish it around in new, conditioned water, but then you'd get that water all dirty. If it's used tank water, it's already dirty and you were just going to throw it away anyway, right?

You can change filters by just adding the second one alongside the first and letting them both run for about a month. At that time you should be able to remove the old filter safely. However, why not run both at once? That way, you'll have an extra filter in case one breaks. Also, if you don't already have a hospital/quarantine tank, you can buy yourself a cheap tank (10g tanks are $11 at Petsmart) and when you need to treat or quarantine a fish, just move that Tetra filter over to the 10g, fill the tank with water, and presto, you've got a cycled filter and therefore a cycled tank.
because the way i do my water changes, i dont have any old water to swish it in. My pump pumps the water outisde and it mixes with regular tap water.

Ive been thinking about getting a little tank or something to use like that. I should have enough extra equipment that all i would really need is the tank.
Burninator is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rock changing pH?? FISHSD Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 13 08-15-2007 12:09 AM
Canister filters vs. Hang-on filters. MattD Freshwater Aquarium Equipment 7 06-09-2007 10:49 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:33 AM.