Caring for a large tank. - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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Caring for a large tank.

I hope to one day have a large tank or two. It got me wondering, how do you care for them? When you do a water change do you just get a really big bucket and fill it up multiple times? How do you fill it back up? It is mind boggling to me that people have figured out ways to do this, short of pulling a garden hose through a window (or maybe that is how it's done?)
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post #2 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 02:14 PM
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Most of us use a water changer, such as a python or aquaeon. I use a pump to drain the tanks and a python to refill them - no buckets.

Large tanks are very easy to maintain. However, it can also be a proportionately larger headache if you don't have things on the right track.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #3 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 02:20 PM
it also depends on how you stocked it too.dirty fish means you have to clean it more often then smaller tanks with cleaner fish.also theres if you are over stocked.but with a big tank and a even stocked tank you should get away with a bi weekly water change.even if you are understocked nothing makes ur fish happier then nice clean water.to change mine i use a water changer aand 5 gallon pale just to keep tabs on the gallon count.
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post #4 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 02:42 PM
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I use a gravel vac and hose it out the window then pull the garden hose in because I prefer my water before it hits the softener

That would make sense. Haven't you heard? We make yogurt, not sense.

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post #5 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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I had no idea what a water changer was til I just looked it up. That's really cool that they have something like that. I keep my tank next to the kitchen sink so I can put the end of the hose into it and use the facet to fill it. I didn't know there was a way to do basically the same thing an keep the tank somewhere else. It's probably a little sad how awesome I think that is lol.
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post #6 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 03:05 PM
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I would not have the tanks I do were it not for the water changer.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #7 of 9 Old 07-18-2012, 03:10 PM
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My preferance is to use a pump to drain and fill my 75 gallon tank. But prior to that I also have prepared 40 gallons of pre-treated water well in advance using a 30 gallon tank and a 20 gallon trash can to hold the pre-treated water. This water is constantly aerated by a pump placed on the bottom of the trashcan and the water goes into the 30 gallon tank and then by using an overflow, allows the water to gravity flow back to the trashcan. On water change day, there is no Chlorine or Chloramines in it and its Temperature is set at the 75 gallon tank Temperature and the General Hardness is set where I want it to be.
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post #8 of 9 Old 07-19-2012, 07:20 AM
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I use an Aqueon Water change for my 125 gallon.

However, I'm thinking of buying an electric pump to do the draining.

The problem with water changes that hook up to the sink is they only work great if your sink is lower than your tank (water always flows down, gravity and all). If your sink is higher, which it is in most cases unless your tank is up stairs, you must keep your faucet on the entire time you are draining the tank. When water is running, it creates a siphon on the water changer drawing water up.

For my 125 gallon aquarium, it takes a lot time to do even a 1/3 change (15-20 minutes), so I would be wasting several gallons of water every week. A solution I found was running the hose out the door and using the garden hose to just get the siphon started, then letting it gravity drain into the lawn. That works fine now, but won't in Winter.
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post #9 of 9 Old 07-19-2012, 08:46 PM
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Using a pump to drain the tank will cut your water change time in half. You can still hook up a gravel vac to t, if you wished.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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