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post #1 of 5 Old 04-02-2011, 11:05 AM Thread Starter
Carbon in the filter?

How many of you actually use carbon in your filter. I was thinking and wouldn't it remove the plant fert. the liquid type like comprehensive flourish. I do but I don't know if I have to. It is probably the most expensive part of my filter collectively.

38 gallon :
Pelvicachromis Taeniatus Nigerian Red not yet breeding pair
4 Pangio Kuhli
12 Hemmigrammus Bleheri
2 Botia Lohachata
1 Botia Straita
1 Ancistrus Sp.
6 Poecilia Reticulata




The Wet Spot Portland Oregon!!!!!!

ADA: Do!aqua Iwagumi 10 gallon size!
7 Clown Killies
7 Ghost shrimp
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post #2 of 5 Old 04-02-2011, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christople View Post
How many of you actually use carbon in your filter. I was thinking and wouldn't it remove the plant fert. the liquid type like comprehensive flourish. I do but I don't know if I have to. It is probably the most expensive part of my filter collectively.
I don't run my carbon pad in my canister. Carbon molecules are some sticky stuff. simply put they will attach to many things in the water there for removing them. I don't know if it would take out all the fert. but more then likely it will take alot of the nutreints from it that the plants need. I wouldn't run it unless it was for a short time. I am sure there are some here that can explain it in better detail than I can.
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post #3 of 5 Old 04-02-2011, 12:42 PM
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Carbon removes "stuff" from the water by adsorption. Some of the "stuff" removed will be nutrients that the plants can use. In planted tanks, carbon should not be employed on a regular basis but only when needed such as to remove a medication after treatment. Not only does it remove nutrients, but the plants themselves act as detoxifiers of much of the "stuff" carbon targets, so it is less expensive (because carbon needs replacing regularly) to let the plants do the work for you.

AQs noted, the carbon will exhaust its adsorbtion capability; the time for this depends upon how much carbon, and how much "stuff" it is adsorbing, which in part depends upon how many fish in the tank, what's in the water, fish foods added, etc. My point in mentioning this is that eventually the carbon will cease to work and at that point is no issue as it is simply "filling space." But until then, it will remove nutrients to some degree. If you can do it easily, I would remove the carbon.

There is also the issue that there may be other chemical media in with carbon, and this could have further impact on plants.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 5 Old 04-02-2011, 01:28 PM
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I used to use carbon, but once I switched to custom media I stopped. I figured if I noticed anything change I would start using it again. I didn't, so I didn't. Not one of my filters have carbon in them, though I do save the bags in case I ever have to medicate or something.

I often see carbon recommended for bad smelling water, but to me that's just covering up a problem. The water should not smell bad. Period. If it does then there is something wrong, and IMO it's more important to figure out what that is and correct it.

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125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
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post #5 of 5 Old 04-02-2011, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
My water smells like plants.

38 gallon :
Pelvicachromis Taeniatus Nigerian Red not yet breeding pair
4 Pangio Kuhli
12 Hemmigrammus Bleheri
2 Botia Lohachata
1 Botia Straita
1 Ancistrus Sp.
6 Poecilia Reticulata




The Wet Spot Portland Oregon!!!!!!

ADA: Do!aqua Iwagumi 10 gallon size!
7 Clown Killies
7 Ghost shrimp
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