Can't get ph up - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 20 Old 08-24-2011, 11:58 AM
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Just to add my agreement with what has been suggested. The article (mine) that Barb linked will explain how hardness and pH are connected, and that is the issue here. However, raising pH via chemicals is always bad, and the methods others mentioned using mineral (calcareous gravel, coral, etc) is far safer. But as also was mentioned, this may not be necessary.

You haven't told us the fish species, but assuming they are soft acidic water fish they will be just as happy in pH 6 as in pH 6.4. We can offer more when we know the fish species, and your tap water hardness.

And welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #12 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Barb/Byron,

Current fish kept: 4 Silver Dollars, 3 Angels, 8 Serpe Tetras and 2 Albino Corrys...

I've tried to add bala sharks, red tailed sharks but they don't seem to last long......
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post #13 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by oh1vette View Post
Thanks Barb/Byron,

Current fish kept: 4 Silver Dollars, 3 Angels, 8 Serpe Tetras and 2 Albino Corrys...

I've tried to add bala sharks, red tailed sharks but they don't seem to last long......

The current fish that you have right now will all be fine kept at the ph that is in the tank. They all come from soft acidic waters of South America.
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post #14 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 10:44 AM
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The slightly acidic pH is fine for the fish mentioned, but assuming they are all in the same tank you have stocking problems waiting to occur.

Scalare Angelfish and Silver Dollar should not be together; mainly, angelfish like to have plants, and SD do too except the latter eat them. Also, as these fish mature, they may not view each other so friendly.

The Serpae Tetra are notorious fin nippers, and long fin and sedate fish like angels should never be in the same tank. Things may "appear" OK now, but the Serpae are inherently "nasty" and angelfish can pick up the chemical signals, and that causes stress even if no actual physical interaction occurs. I would not keep these together for the sake of the angelfish.

Corys are shoaling fish that need a group; five is a good number when you have space. No mention is made of the tank size. And on that note, with angelfish and SD you need at least a 4-foot tank as they mature.

Bala shark and Red Tailed Shark are not community fish in the normal sense. The latter can be downright nasty as it attains its mature size of 5 inches, and other substrate fish that are similar in shape are best avoided. Bala shark need a very large tank, 8-feet in length, as they attain 14-16 inches and must be in a group. Obviously other fish in the tank will be appropriate.

You can read more on these fish in our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top; if the name is used exactly the same in posts as it appears in the profile, it will shade and you can click on it to see that profile. Please have a read for these fish.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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Hear ya, but its odd, I've had the SDs for years, never any live plants.

Angels I've had since about nickle body size and their quite large now.

The Serpes (recent addition) seem to stay away from the Angels, maybe due to size(?)

Balas I had 6 at one time, but lost em (more or less thru neglect - traveled alot for a period of time)

I know, behavior goes against the book, but thats what I'm seeing - - maybe the low ph keeps em all mellow

Had a 55 gal, now have a 45 bowfront acrylic...



Tonite, I'll try to post a few pics of the fish...
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post #16 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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Just read Byrons article, very informative....and understandable

Thanks for taking the time....
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post #17 of 20 Old 08-25-2011, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Hear ya, but its odd, I've had the SDs for years, never any live plants.

Angels I've had since about nickle body size and their quite large now.

The Serpes (recent addition) seem to stay away from the Angels, maybe due to size(?)

Balas I had 6 at one time, but lost em (more or less thru neglect - traveled alot for a period of time)

I know, behavior goes against the book, but thats what I'm seeing - - maybe the low ph keeps em all mellow

Had a 55 gal, now have a 45 bowfront acrylic...



Tonite, I'll try to post a few pics of the fish...
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post #18 of 20 Old 08-29-2011, 03:51 PM
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One final thought on all the good advice so far. Is your testing solution/strips for pH out of date? You could be getting a consistently false reading because it's past its expiration date. Just a thought.

AC
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post #19 of 20 Old 08-30-2011, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
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AquaCheif, thanks, yeah I thought the same and bought a new kit - same result...

I need to get a kh kit, I'm thinking now from all the above that may be it....
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post #20 of 20 Old 08-30-2011, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh1vette View Post
AquaCheif, thanks, yeah I thought the same and bought a new kit - same result...

I need to get a kh kit, I'm thinking now from all the above that may be it....
Unless you plan to adjust the hardness, I wouldn't waste the money for a KH test. Your water supply people can provide the GH and KH of the tap water, and that will not change in the aquarium unless you deliberately do so. Once you know the hardness, the pH shift will be somewhat predictable.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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