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Can I use terrarium/reptile wood in aquariums?

This is a discussion on Can I use terrarium/reptile wood in aquariums? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> manzanita is fine, but 8 bucks is steep. Mine was 25 for a box of 18 pieces... Even sandblasted, theres still bark on it, ...

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Can I use terrarium/reptile wood in aquariums?
Old 05-09-2011, 09:37 AM   #11
 
manzanita is fine, but 8 bucks is steep. Mine was 25 for a box of 18 pieces... Even sandblasted, theres still bark on it, it needs to be stripped of all bark or itll mess up your tank when it rots.
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:00 PM   #12
 
Setting aside the issue of tannins and staining, aren't most woods (driftwood or not) going to slowly decay and like debris affect the nitrogen cycle (admitting that wood decays much more slowly than other debris) ???

"Wouldn't you rather have a nice piece of plastic?" - lol
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:24 PM   #13
 
hard woods can last a long time, my bogwood has been in my tank for almost 5 years now and still fine. Softer woods will decay much faster.

Although nowadays, plasticn decor is great and some look very realistic, it will never be the same as real driftwood. Real wood offers textures, twists, and grain patterns that are unique to each piece and the variety cannot be replicated by plastic decor. For example, the manzanita i use in my tanks, i am confident that nobody else will ever be able to get the exact same pieces that I have and that my aquascape will be unique to me.

On the other hand, its a pain in the behind to find all those pieces of wood and make them work in a scape, arranging them takes forever and sometimes it just doesnt work out :-/ So i guess it all depends on whats important to the hobbyist.
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Old 05-09-2011, 06:02 PM   #14
 
wow where did you get it?
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Old 05-09-2011, 06:17 PM   #15
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SinCrisis View Post
hard woods can last a long time, my bogwood has been in my tank for almost 5 years now and still fine. Softer woods will decay much faster.

Although nowadays, plasticn decor is great and some look very realistic, it will never be the same as real driftwood. Real wood offers textures, twists, and grain patterns that are unique to each piece and the variety cannot be replicated by plastic decor. For example, the manzanita i use in my tanks, i am confident that nobody else will ever be able to get the exact same pieces that I have and that my aquascape will be unique to me.

On the other hand, its a pain in the behind to find all those pieces of wood and make them work in a scape, arranging them takes forever and sometimes it just doesnt work out :-/ So i guess it all depends on whats important to the hobbyist.
I know, back in the day I had a nice piece of DW, looked almost like a dull brown velvet in the water. The trouble with the plastics is the color is too crisp, nature is more, well, plain.
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Old 05-09-2011, 07:20 PM   #16
 
it's the plainness that makes it calming... not to much going on just mealow
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Old 05-09-2011, 07:48 PM   #17
 
if you look at my aquarium picture you can see the difference between natural and plastic. The bad thing about plastic is the paint either chips or can fade. The fake one is leaving my tank soon.
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:01 PM   #18
 
debris and mulm do not effect the nitrogen cycle unless you dump a ton into a tank with a low bioload then it might have some effect. I have never had any issues with bark... yeah it rots faster/falls off usually but doesn't mess up the tank as far as I have seen. Most of the wood I use these days comes from the woods and its not boiled, soaked, or debarked before it goes in my tank. I've used various species from soft to hardwoods and there is definitely a difference in breakdown time. I like to leave the bark on, gives it a very nice natural look. Sure some of it falls off eventually, much faster in tanks with snails and shrimp always attacking and eating it. Some pieces keep their bark for a long time though... a year or more.

Plastic wood looks unnatural and doesn't hold up well at all. You also can't get it for free...
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:05 PM   #19
 
how do you get it to sink... mine is being a turd and not sinking on it's own
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Old 05-09-2011, 10:43 PM   #20
 
takes time to water log, my manzanita took a few days before it sank. THe bark is mostly harmless but it browns your water faster and ends up being more work to keep the tank looking clear. i posted the site where i got my manzanita christple, you even commented on it saying you dont know what handcrafted wood meant.
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