Can I Lower Nitrites without chemicals??? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 5 Old 09-25-2012, 02:00 AM Thread Starter
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Can I Lower Nitrites without chemicals???

Nitrite level in the stress zone. I did a water change to see if I could rectify the problem. How long after can I use the strips to perform the test to see if the change has occurred. I dont want to lose any fish so any help can help.

My levels were good a few days ago and the only thing that I did was add a UV sterilizer. Should I shut it down for a few days to see if there is a change? The water is crisp and crystal clear and all of the fish seem to be healthy and happy no apparent stress at the moment. What made me look into the test and water change was that my Ruby Green (Haplochromis) was not as vibrant and brilliant as he has been for the past week.

Any help
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post #2 of 5 Old 09-25-2012, 02:17 AM
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Originally Posted by robin623 View Post
Nitrite level in the stress zone. I did a water change to see if I could rectify the problem. How long after can I use the strips to perform the test to see if the change has occurred. I dont want to lose any fish so any help can help.

My levels were good a few days ago and the only thing that I did was add a UV sterilizer. Should I shut it down for a few days to see if there is a change? The water is crisp and crystal clear and all of the fish seem to be healthy and happy no apparent stress at the moment. What made me look into the test and water change was that my Ruby Green (Haplochromis) was not as vibrant and brilliant as he has been for the past week.

Any help
How old is your tank? You should invest in an API liquid test kit, they may be a little more expensive but they last for a long time. Strips are very inaccurate and useless. Assuming your tank is new(uncycled) with fish in it , you need to be doing daily water changes. Clean and clear water is not an indication of healthy water.Water changes will bring down ammonia , nitrites and nitrates.

Consider the needs of your fish before acting on your desires.

Last edited by marshallsea; 09-25-2012 at 02:19 AM.
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post #3 of 5 Old 09-25-2012, 08:31 AM
Marshall is correct....you need to follow that advice. Also, I've never used a UV sterilizer, but I certainly would not use one when cycling a new tank. Wait and optionally use that after that tank has matured.

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post #4 of 5 Old 09-25-2012, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by robin623 View Post
Nitrite level in the stress zone. I did a water change to see if I could rectify the problem. How long after can I use the strips to perform the test to see if the change has occurred. I dont want to lose any fish so any help can help.

My levels were good a few days ago and the only thing that I did was add a UV sterilizer. Should I shut it down for a few days to see if there is a change? The water is crisp and crystal clear and all of the fish seem to be healthy and happy no apparent stress at the moment. What made me look into the test and water change was that my Ruby Green (Haplochromis) was not as vibrant and brilliant as he has been for the past week.

Any help
BTW, what is the purpose of a UV sterilizer?

Consider the needs of your fish before acting on your desires.
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post #5 of 5 Old 09-25-2012, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by marshallsea View Post
BTW, what is the purpose of a UV sterilizer?
This may answer your question:
UV Sterilization - What Is It, and How Are UV Sterilizers Used in Saltwater Marine Aquariums

While this klills bacteria, it does so in the water column, not on surfaces in the tank, so on its own I would not expect it to be causing a rise in nitrites. But as others mentioned, we haven't got all the data on this tank, so this may be initial cycling or it may be a different problem.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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