Brown Algae everywhere! - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Brown Algae everywhere!

Brown Algae everywhere!

This is a discussion on Brown Algae everywhere! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Always be careful not to vaccum too aggressively in a young tank. Don't go too deep and only vaccum say one third of the ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Diamond Tetra
Diamond Tetra
Paradise Fish
Paradise Fish
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Brown Algae everywhere!
Old 04-30-2008, 05:01 AM   #11
 
1077's Avatar
 
Always be careful not to vaccum too aggressively in a young tank. Don't go too deep and only vaccum say one third of the tank at each water change, a different area each time. In this way you will not destroy beneficial bacteria needed to break down harmful substances. I apologize for not posting this info sooner. :(
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 12:05 PM   #12
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
This doesn't sound like a diatom algae to me. Brown slime algae can also come from excess phospates and lack of circulation in a tank. I will agree that it sounds as if something in your water is causing the problem, and the more often you do the water changes, the worse it's going to get. I am most curious to see a phosphate reading on the tap water and also on the tank. There are filter medias available that will help you to resolve this problem quickly, I can suggest a few for you to choose from. The problem is in the tap water, there are 2 long term solutions for you.
1. Use bottled spring water, but be sure it is spring water and not distilled or basic drinking water. The filtration process is different for all of these, and distilled is not safe to use 100% and drinking water will often contain many of the same things you are dealing with now in the tap water.
2. Run a filter with media in it to remove phosphates, nitrates, and silicates (among other things). This can be done 1 of 2 ways. You can run the filter directly on the tank, provided the water current isn't too strong and doesn't stress the fish, or you could put tap water in a bucket, run the filter on there, and use the water from the bucket to do water changes. If using this bucket method, please expect the water to need to be filtered for 48 - 72 hrs before using it in the tank. This method is often needed for betta tanks because most bettas can't handle having a filter on the tank.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 09:23 PM   #13
 
I have a Red Sea brand test kit, but it doesn't have anything that measures Phosphates (I payed $45 for it, too).

I'll take readings for both Tap and Tank water and get back to you guys shortly.

Honestly, I can't afford to be buying bottled water so often.

I can tell you right now that I have a reading of 20 Nitrates from my tap water.

There is plenty of circulation in the tank, the filter I have is really good, and it pours the water out gently enough not to disturb most of the tank.
Togiran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 09:46 PM   #14
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
I took a look at the one picture you have in your tank profiles, and I see no evidence of algae.
Can you please post a current picture of the tank with the algae in it? As much of a close up of the algae as you can get would help a lot in identifying the species, thus telling us how best to deal with it, along with a full tank shot so we can see how it is growing.

Without a picture at this point, there's not going to be any other way to identify the species of algae... unless you have the ability to run it under a microscope.

BTW, your light shown in the picture is incandescent not fluorescent, that was very obvious. Incandescent can feed brown algae. Running it for 12 hrs/day could be helping to contribute to your problem.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 10:10 PM   #15
 
Lol, sorry, but it's DEFINITELY fluorescent. I got rid of my incandescent bulbs.

Tank/Tap parameters are coming in the next post. I'll take a picture while you look over them.
Togiran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 10:28 PM   #16
 
Here are the pictures. The algae is so bad now.





The view from the inside out really shows how bad it is.
Togiran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 11:40 PM   #17
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
What I am seeing in the photos looks like a combination of slime algae and possibly a bit of diatom. The only way to know for sure is to scope it. If you'd like to send me a sample, scrape the algae from the glass with a blade and put it with a couple of tsp's of tank water into a zip lock bag, then add another zip lock to make sure it doesn't leak. A small box so it doesn't get ruptured, and ship it off to me in regular mail. It shouldn't cost much more than mailing a large greeting card. If you pm me I'll give you the address to ship it to. I can then tell you for sure within 10 minutes or less, what kind of algae you're dealing with, what feeds it, and how best to eliminate it. Without a sample under the scope, all we'll be doing here is guessing.

I also want to add, after looking at your water parameters, I would seriously consider filtering that water before using in on your tank. If the bottled water is too much expense, simply get a bucket, a good hang on filter, and filter media like PuraPad, let the water filter for 48 - 72 hrs before using it in the tank. That will eliminate your nitrates and silicates, and phosphates if there are any. If it's the condition of the tap water that is feeding the algae problem, unfortunately, that is going to be about your only solution in getting rid of it.
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2008, 11:43 PM   #18
 
Thanks bettababy, I'll consider sending out a sample to you.

Can you recommend me a good HOB filter? A link to one would be nice. Preferably Petco/Petsmart. I fill up a bucket with 2.5 gallons of water for every water change, so a HOB filter would work out well.
Togiran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2008, 12:07 AM   #19
 
bettababy's Avatar
 
I would suggest this filter, and because of what you're using it for, I'd suggest getting the one rated for up to 20 gallons. You want the turnover rate to push it through the filter media as much as possible within 48 - 72 hrs so you can use safe water.
http://www.petco.com/product/102601/...r-Filters.aspx

I am pretty sure that neither petco or petsmart will carry the filter media you are needing, I couldn't find it on either website. I also noticed that Dr's Foster & Smith doesn't have it anymore either... but I know this stuff works... so I went searching for a reliable place for you to order it online.
http://www.marinedepot.com/ps_Aquari...ation_pad.html

I know a lot of people who've ordered from MarineDepot.com and had great experience with it, so you might want to give it a try. The specific product you want on that page is either the PuraPad or the PuraComplete. They are the same thing just different form. This is the only media I know of that removes so much and is safe to use long term, so you can put it in your tank filter as well as on the bucket. If using this product, you won't need to use just standard carbon in the filter, either. PuraPad is easy to cut a piece the right size to fit to replace the filter cartridge, and then simply replace it in the tank about every 3 wks, and on the bucket about once/month. For what you're doing, a little bit will go a long way!
bettababy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2008, 06:57 AM   #20
 
1077's Avatar
 
chemical filtration used to remove nitrates often either decreases the production rate of nitrates from biofilter or absorbs nitrate after it has been produced.this media needs to be recharged and how often brings too many variables into play source water,feeding and maint. routine stocking levels etc. some should NOT be used in salt water or tanks using salt to treat disease for they can release nitrates rapidly and in high levels back into the tank. Some also remove CO2 (chemi-pure) comes to mind and they will also starve plants in some cases of nitrates needed.Products such as NITRA-ZORB absorb nitrate by replacing the nitrate ion and is for freshwater only. However it has been reprted to only absorb 16 to 20ppm before exhuasting and would need to be recharged about 40 times to reduce (not remove)20 ppm nitrate (per litre) in a 10 gal. tank to negligible levels.other products such as SEACHEMS DE- NITRATE must be used in low flow filters of 50 gph or less. It will not work in high flow filters. Nitrate SPONGE by KENT MARINE also for low flow filters. Coil denitrators are effective but some require feeding sugar several times per day and flow rates need constant monitoring to keep bleed valves open for they clog easily also the end result of these units is oxygen depleted water that in some cases must be run through oxygen chamber to re -oxygenate, I believe all of the afore mentioned filter media can help control nitrates. But I also believe that water cchanges combined with proper stocking levels and maint along with not overfeeding can achieve the same results easier, faster, and much cheaper. The exhaustion rate of these products can differ dramatically despite what they claim .
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brown algae karjean Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 6 03-22-2010 12:47 PM
Help with Brown Algae...... JohnnyD44 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 28 09-24-2009 02:28 PM
Brown algae jesterns2 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 0 03-09-2009 10:19 PM
Brown Algae el Mattador Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 2 01-28-2009 09:13 AM
Brown Algae? Twitch Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 3 05-28-2008 10:21 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:21 PM.