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post #1 of 5 Old 01-01-2012, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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Black mold?

Hey everyone. I just came back from a weeklong vacation to find that my 5 gallon tank has been slightly overtaken by some black mold. It's in addition to the generic green algae that I'm going to work on in the water change I'm about to do. But what should I do about the black mold that has completely covered one of my large decorations? Is this something that could be fixed by a carbon filter media change? I haven't ever changed it, and I'm wondering if that's even necessary.

Thanks!
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post #2 of 5 Old 01-01-2012, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by etanico View Post
Hey everyone. I just came back from a weeklong vacation to find that my 5 gallon tank has been slightly overtaken by some black mold. It's in addition to the generic green algae that I'm going to work on in the water change I'm about to do. But what should I do about the black mold that has completely covered one of my large decorations? Is this something that could be fixed by a carbon filter media change? I haven't ever changed it, and I'm wondering if that's even necessary.

Thanks!

I doubt replacing the carbon will take care of that. You should look at how long your lights are on, perhaps cut that back by a couple/few hours. I have no idea what the "black" stuff would be. Some type of algae? You could take the decoration out and scrub it clean without chemicals.

Gwen

Just because animals can't talk, does not mean they should not be heard
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post #3 of 5 Old 01-02-2012, 01:33 PM
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It might be a type of cyanobacteria, which can occur as green to very dark black-green, and even red. As Amanda said, clean the decor, if it easily comes off as a slimy film it is probably cyano. A thorough water change will also help, but be careful. Depending upon your pH of the tank water and the tap water, a large water change could create ammonia poisoning. Take it slow.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #4 of 5 Old 01-02-2012, 02:34 PM
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It might be a type of cyanobacteria, which can occur as green to very dark black-green, and even red. As Amanda said, clean the decor, if it easily comes off as a slimy film it is probably cyano. A thorough water change will also help, but be careful. Depending upon your pH of the tank water and the tap water, a large water change could create ammonia poisoning. Take it slow.
I didn't think cyanobacteria can grow in freshwater, I've seen it grow rampant in saltwater though, but never heard of in fresh- good tip!


-=+8 Gallon Planted+=-
Fauna:
1x Honey Gourami
2x Otocinclus Affinis
6x Flame Tetra
6x Ember Tetra
2x Apple Snail (Hitched on Rotala)

Flora:
Dwarf Sagittaria
Ludwigia Repens X L. Arcuata
Staurogyne Repen
Cryptocoryne lutea
Cryptocoryne Wendti
Cryptocoryne spiralis
Amazon Sword
Java Moss
Java Fern
Anubias minima
Water Primrose
Pogostemon Yatabeanus
Limnophila sp. 'mini'
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post #5 of 5 Old 01-02-2012, 04:24 PM
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I didn't think cyanobacteria can grow in freshwater, I've seen it grow rampant in saltwater though, but never heard of in fresh- good tip!
Some of us have been plagued with cyanobacteria periodically. It is caused by organics, so fortunately it usually is connected to a high organic load or poor maintenance (infrequent water changes, overcrowding fish, etc). But it can also occur in this or that tank. I have had it a couple of times in bad bouts, but aside from that I sometimes see a tiny bit on floating plants. But it is interesting how it occurs in some tanks and never in others. It is usually considered in with "algae" problems, although it is a bacteria and not an algae.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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