Beginner's problem - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
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Beginner's problem

Hi,

My name is Bob and I am totally new to this but want to learn. here is my problem.

I have a 10 gallon fresh water aquarium. I started to set it up three days ago and everything appeared to go well. The first day I filled it with tap water and put in the required amount of nutrafin cycle ( the label said 25 ml) for day one and nutrafin Aquaplus ( the label said 5 ml for chlorine and 10 ml for chlormine). Day two and three (today) I put in 10 ml of cycle as the label said. My heater was set at high and the temp went to 86 degrees over a period of time. Last night (day two) my water was very clear but L lowered the temp trying to get it around 78 degrees. When I came home this afternoon my water was no longer clear. It was murkish (grayish). I am wondering what caused this. Will it clear up or do I have to start over. I'd appreciate any assistant I can get.
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post #2 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 02:26 PM
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Hi Bob, and welcome to TFK!

Counter-intuitively, the cloudiness might actually be a good sign in your case. Kudos for fishless cycling also. The cloudiness is almost certainly a bacteria bloom caused by the additives you're using and yes it should clear up as your water parameters stabilize. If you want to try and help it along, do a series of partial water changes, and try sucking the water from the top of the water column instead of near the gravel. I'm not sure how your cycling product works, but the bacteria you're trying to grow needs a source of ammonia as food. The source could be a fish (fish-in cycling), or pure ammonia, fish food, or frozen shrimp (fishless cycling). If you don't feed your bacteria it will constantly die out and you will get nowhere. Refer to this thread about cycling for more complete information: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-aquarium/beginners-guide-freshwater-aquarium-cycle-38617

Oh, and one more thing! Make sure you're treating your water with dechlorinator before it enters your tank! From now on simply dumping in tap water and adding conditioner to the tank is not adequate. I would also suggest purchasing a good water parameter test kit, such as the API master test kit, to keep an eye on your tank's progress. Good luck!
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post #3 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 03:03 PM
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Agree with the above, read the article will help alot.

As for the water changes, many of us here do just dump tap water in but we always add the water conditioner to the tank before adding the tap.
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post #4 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 04:46 PM
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Thing about adding water to the tank before or after adding conditioner, it is ok to add untreated water to the tank as long as you add conditioner to the tank first. However, you have to add enough conditioner to treat the ENTIRE volume of water in the tank, not just the amount of water you are adding. So in your case, you have to treat for 10 gallons instead of say 2 gallons if you did a 20% water change. So you can see how it will use up a lot more conditioner costing you more money. If you pre-treat the water, you only treat the new water you are adding, in this case, 2 gallons. So it becomes an issue of cost vs. convenience. It's much easier to treat the tank and just add water from your sink via a hose, but you save money by using buckets.
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post #5 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 05:00 PM
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Agree with all that's been posted, except one thing: do not do a water change with a bacterial bloom as this will make it worse or prolong it. When fish are in the tank, and if ammonia or nitrite rises, yes, a 50% water change is crucial for the fish. But without fish, leave it alone.

If you want to read more on why a bacterial bloom occurs in a new tank, have a look at:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/
especially the section on bacterial blooms.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks to everyone. I take it that I should add some fish food to help create ammonia. Would that be a couple of pinches each day? I know every situation is different but after 4 or 5 days should I be able to add fish?
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post #7 of 7 Old 01-05-2012, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktone View Post
Thanks to everyone. I take it that I should add some fish food to help create ammonia. Would that be a couple of pinches each day? I know every situation is different but after 4 or 5 days should I be able to add fish?
Earlier in this thread someone posted the link to the article on cycling [different from the article I linked]. If you do fishless cycling, that one explains it.

Myself, i always have live plants so there is no "cycling" to speak of.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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