Beginner 30g Tank Setup
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Beginner 30g Tank Setup

This is a discussion on Beginner 30g Tank Setup within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I'm trying to set up my first tank, I've got a 30g tank with a aquaclear50 filter on the way. My planned fish were ...

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Beginner 30g Tank Setup
Old 10-18-2010, 11:16 PM   #1
 
Beginner 30g Tank Setup

I'm trying to set up my first tank, I've got a 30g tank with a aquaclear50 filter on the way. My planned fish were to be
10 Glowlight tetras
5 Peppered Cories
1 Honey Gourami
and maybe 10 or so shrimp
I am going to do a fish less cycle on the tank.

Would any be able to tell me if this assortment of fish in the tank will work well, if not what should I maybe replace the fish with; or anything else that may work well in the tank. Which fish should I add first and how many at a time?

I also wish to plant the tank, but have no idea what plants would be good, I read that you should have some floating plants for some of the fish in the tank, and java moss or something for the shrimp, any and all advice about plants would be great.

Other then that just any general advice or tips for starting my aquarium would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Last edited by andersatan; 10-18-2010 at 11:21 PM..
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Old 10-19-2010, 02:18 PM   #2
 
Welcome to another Canadian on the forum,
That set up seems to be fine all of the fish should get along, someone else will have to let you know about whether they will eat the shrimp or not.

As for plants go with something that is lowtech for a begginning set up. I have cabomba, amazon sword java moss dwarf sag in my planted tanks and they are great. The moss you really need for the shrimp, they like it.

you could also add a few more fish if you wanted it is stocked at only around 60 percent

Good luck with the tank I am working on setting up a 30 gal as well, its lots of fun :D
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Old 10-19-2010, 04:36 PM   #3
 
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It sounds like a great setup to me. Perhaps with the additional stocking room in your tank you could get 1 or 2 more peppered corydoras (as they are school fish), but you should do fine with 5 if you choose. Sounds like good stocking choices to me! Good luck with your new tank setup!
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Old 10-21-2010, 12:32 AM   #4
 
Thanks for the responses. Just got my tank today, got it off kijiji. I ended up getting a 25 gallon tank, so not a big difference there, aquaclear 50 filter and a heater that you stick in the tank.... which the temperature cannot be adjusted but the guy said it heats to 79 degrees so not a problem. I left some of the water that was in his tank in it during transport to keep the bio filter alive, hoping not to have to cycle the tank. Everything is set up and running now. The tank also has one each, mangrove and bamboo plants tall enough that they stick out the top, and some little plant sprouts from either the bamboo or mangrove... I'm not quite sure yet.

Now I have a few questions and a slight problem.
Problem first, the tank is overrun with snails, I know loach's and assassin snails will eat them, I haven't been to the LFS yet to see if they have assassin snails, if they do I'm sure to buy one(?) should I buy more then one?
If they don't what should I do about my problem, what loach's would fit in my tank without outgrowing it, and would they be compatible with the fish I was hoping to buy. If not which fish would be recommended to switch out/in.

My questions are, which fish should I bring into the tank first, how many at a time, and the length of time between new fish?
Also hhow long does it take for the tank to come to temperature usually?
That's all I can think of for now... thanks in advance.
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Old 10-21-2010, 03:22 AM   #5
 
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Honestly, I'm not sure you've done a whole lot to keep the biofilter intact. I might be tempted to pitch everything, clean out the tank really well to get rid of any snail eggs, and then start over.

Other than that, you can sorta fight it out killing them off manually, but that usually works better when you start from not being overrun.
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Old 10-21-2010, 09:02 AM   #6
 
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Originally Posted by burnsbabe View Post
Honestly, I'm not sure you've done a whole lot to keep the biofilter intact. I might be tempted to pitch everything, clean out the tank really well to get rid of any snail eggs, and then start over.

Other than that, you can sorta fight it out killing them off manually, but that usually works better when you start from not being overrun.
Hmm that actually sounds like it a good idea, would also give me an opportunity to get rid of the neon substrate he had in it for some more natural looking stuff. After the first night of the tank running I'm also not sure that the heater is working at all as the tank hasn't come up past 60 degrees, so what what would be a recommended heater to pick up?

Last edited by andersatan; 10-21-2010 at 09:04 AM..
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Old 10-21-2010, 09:55 PM   #7
 
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Welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

In your winter climate, I would get a good heater. In my 33g I have a 200w heater. It is worth the money to buy the best you can. A higher wattage heater works less to heat the water so it lasts longer, and it is more durable right from the start. In 20 years, the only heaters that have ever failed me are 50w, three of them.

When you fill the tank, use warm and cold water at the approximate temp you want it to remain. Then place the heater in, plug it in after maybe 20 minutes, and assuming the tank is at the correct temp adjust the heater until it does not remain on. It takes a bit of fiddling for several hours. By the next day it should be OK.

If you add plants first, you will not need to bother with any cycling. A few fish, in your case the glowlights would be best first, and then a few days later the corys. For plants, several in our profiles are suitable. Fish and plant profiles are under the second tab from the left in the blue bar at the top of the screen.

Set the tank up (new substrate, a dark natural fine gravel or sand, I prefer gravel), filter and heater running, leave it for 24 hours, if all is OK, plant it. Then add the glowlights.
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Old 10-22-2010, 02:15 AM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

In your winter climate, I would get a good heater. In my 33g I have a 200w heater. It is worth the money to buy the best you can. A higher wattage heater works less to heat the water so it lasts longer, and it is more durable right from the start. In 20 years, the only heaters that have ever failed me are 50w, three of them.

When you fill the tank, use warm and cold water at the approximate temp you want it to remain. Then place the heater in, plug it in after maybe 20 minutes, and assuming the tank is at the correct temp adjust the heater until it does not remain on. It takes a bit of fiddling for several hours. By the next day it should be OK.

If you add plants first, you will not need to bother with any cycling. A few fish, in your case the glowlights would be best first, and then a few days later the corys. For plants, several in our profiles are suitable. Fish and plant profiles are under the second tab from the left in the blue bar at the top of the screen.

Set the tank up (new substrate, a dark natural fine gravel or sand, I prefer gravel), filter and heater running, leave it for 24 hours, if all is OK, plant it. Then add the glowlights.
THank you so much for that advice, it really helped out a lot. I'm reading up on a bunch of plants to try and decide which ones to buy.
I was also curious, if I do what you said and set up plants then add in the fish, should I bother buying a water test kit, or is that still a necessity?
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Old 10-22-2010, 06:43 AM   #9
 
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You definitely want to get a test kit. Even when things look perfect, it is good to test your water on a consistent basis. I test every two weeks just to make myself feel better about the water quality but that is on established tanks. For a new tank, I would test much more frequently until everything has stabilized.

Best of Luck to ya!
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Old 10-23-2010, 12:11 PM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcire View Post
You definitely want to get a test kit. Even when things look perfect, it is good to test your water on a consistent basis. I test every two weeks just to make myself feel better about the water quality but that is on established tanks. For a new tank, I would test much more frequently until everything has stabilized.

Best of Luck to ya!
Yes, I agree. The API freshwater combo test kit that includes 4 tests--pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate--is probably the best buy.
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