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Aqueon 36 Bow Amazon Biotope

This is a discussion on Aqueon 36 Bow Amazon Biotope within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ok, I'll check if they carry it over here. What would be an alternative? This was about play sand. Most any smooth sand that ...

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Aqueon 36 Bow Amazon Biotope
Old 07-03-2013, 05:05 PM   #11
 
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ok, I'll check if they carry it over here. What would be an alternative?
This was about play sand. Most any smooth sand that is not white will suffice. Play Sand is ideal because it is not sharp, being made for kids to play in/with, and it is (here anyway) a combo colour (mix of black, tan, white, gray).

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Could have been sulfide, I'd have to check... So, when cleaning the tank I should not vacuum the sand. I bought Aqueon Aquarium Water Changer that has a vacuum function, I could use it to only remove the water necessary for cycles. Speaking of which, how often and quatity should the water changes be?
I use this, though with all my large tanks I have a "Python" that attaches directly to the faucet, but it works the same.

Some tanks I dig into the substrate a bit (my fine gravel one), one I run it across the top of the sand, and in others I never or very rarely touch the substrate. Each tank can be different, and the fish species play a role too.

Quote:
As for the Alternanthera reineckii, it might fair well since there's sunlight about 5-8hrs a day hitting the tank, or this isn't a factor to consider?
It is not good to have direct sun striking an aquarium. First, the sun shining through glass can heat up the water very fast and quite high. Second, this is the surest way to have algae issues, and with as much sun as you indicate you would likely have green water.

Quote:
Was reading up on their behaviour and the jumping out was a major warning. I can leave the hood closed during the day, that should keep em and in check. So 12 is the magic number...
With shoaling fish, whatever species, more is almost always better, so one considers the size of the fish, their normal behaviours/actions, the water volume and tank dimensions (length/width), other fish species. With fish like hatchets that are quiet (not active swimmers, just preferring to sit quietly at the surface), very peaceful, and in this sized tank, 12 to 15 would be my selection.

I had 21 Marbles in my 5-foot tank--until an internal protozoan that came in with new lower fish decimated them down to 4 within a couple of days. After that was dealt with, I increased the group up to 15, then proceeded to lose 3 that jumped during the night and got trapped between the cover glass and the tank brace, so I moved them into my 70g which has other Carnegiella species too, and now they are all happy together and number 23. The Marble and Black-winged cruise side by side, as if they were the same species. More proof that the more there are, the better. These fish live in groups of hundreds in the wild.

Quote:
Ok, its just a slight worry... read on them being territorial and all. If there's two males then one would be alpha and the other wouldn't fully develop until the alpha died. That seems to be common in the fish world... So 1 male and 3 females as you suggested would be it.
This trait (dominant male, the rest subordinate and looking like females to stay out of the dominant's way) is common among the dwarf cichlids in Apistogramma certainly.
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Old 07-03-2013, 05:10 PM   #12
 
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How much would it affect if they were tank bred fish and not wild?
Depends upon the species as well. Even those commonly raised for decades still do better in soft water, but some of them can live longer up to a point.

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How much should he ratio be between tap and rain water?
To make it easy, I would do half/half. This will cut the GH in half, and the pH I don't know but it will lower. TRainwater is on the acidic side to begin with, so it is not only diluting the GH and KH, but increasing acidity as well. Work this out before any fish go in the tank. When you get the test kit, set up the tank with the sand, wood, etc, add water half/half, plant it. Then test over a couple days.

Byron.
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Old 07-03-2013, 05:22 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by DragonRckr View Post
I'm not sure, having a hard time interpreting the water quality report from the water company that manages the islands supply. Guess I'm looking for total hardness, which is 208ppm, then there's calcium hardness which is 130ppm. Can't find pH or specific mention of it... there's Alkalinity which is 132ppm.

IMHO one of the main things to remember is that tank conditions will depend upon how the tank is being ran not just the conditions of the initial input water.

Especially PH which is a function of KH and carbon dioxide. With a planted tank the plants can and hopefully will make the tank a net consumer of co2 each 24 hour period unless you are adding co2 back into the system.

On my planted tanks I use a substrate of peat moss capped with sand and then pc select which is a baked clay. I also do no water changes and as a result I have a KH of 4 degrees, gh of 9 degrees, and a pH of over 8 (api high range test kit.

But even with that high pH fish "requiring" low pH like neon tetras and hachetfish thirve and live for years.

But that's just me and my


.02
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Old 07-08-2013, 01:16 PM   #14
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
This was about play sand. Most any smooth sand that is not white will suffice. Play Sand is ideal because it is not sharp, being made for kids to play in/with, and it is (here anyway) a combo colour (mix of black, tan, white, gray).
I'll be going to Home Depot today during the evening to see if they have it available, hopefully they do.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I use this, though with all my large tanks I have a "Python" that attaches directly to the faucet, but it works the same.

Some tanks I dig into the substrate a bit (my fine gravel one), one I run it across the top of the sand, and in others I never or very rarely touch the substrate. Each tank can be different, and the fish species play a role too.
being a first timer... with the hose vacuum, is there a problem of sucking up substrate that needs to be replaced later or is the suction not that strong? Just want a heads up just in case...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
It is not good to have direct sun striking an aquarium. First, the sun shining through glass can heat up the water very fast and quite high. Second, this is the surest way to have algae issues, and with as much sun as you indicate you would likely have green water.
It's more of indirect, the sun sets infront of the house and would shine in a bit through the livingroom windows which are covered by verticle blinds. But I'll keep an eye out for algae and temps.

As for temp I bought a thermometer sticker to monitor it. Where is the ideal place to put it to have good readings? Had thought of the middle towards the back on side of the tank.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
With shoaling fish, whatever species, more is almost always better, so one considers the size of the fish, their normal behaviours/actions, the water volume and tank dimensions (length/width), other fish species. With fish like hatchets that are quiet (not active swimmers, just preferring to sit quietly at the surface), very peaceful, and in this sized tank, 12 to 15 would be my selection.

I had 21 Marbles in my 5-foot tank--until an internal protozoan that came in with new lower fish decimated them down to 4 within a couple of days. After that was dealt with, I increased the group up to 15, then proceeded to lose 3 that jumped during the night and got trapped between the cover glass and the tank brace, so I moved them into my 70g which has other Carnegiella species too, and now they are all happy together and number 23. The Marble and Black-winged cruise side by side, as if they were the same species. More proof that the more there are, the better. These fish live in groups of hundreds in the wild..
I've been reading about their habits and possibilities of them jumping out. Plan on having the hood on while I'm away and during the night. Is there a real need to have the hood open, such as for airing?

Was at petsmart yesterday, restocking food for my dogs and getting the API Fresh water master test kit... saw that they had silver hatchetfish and silver dollars available. Silver dollars were on my initial list, but was advised that they're heavy plant eaters and I should go with plastic plants if they were going to be in the tank. Is this the case or would be ok to have a few silver dollars in there too with the live plants I plan on? Might have to go with silver hatchet if I can't get a hold of marbled...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
This trait (dominant male, the rest subordinate and looking like females to stay out of the dominant's way) is common among the dwarf cichlids in Apistogramma certainly.

Went back to the acquarium shop to check if they had contacted their supplier regarding the plants and they haven't checked yet... Might give them until this week to have something, then I'll go with the online store.


Thanks for all your help and insight so far, it's been a good learning experience!
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:35 PM   #15
 
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being a first timer... with the hose vacuum, is there a problem of sucking up substrate that needs to be replaced later or is the suction not that strong? Just want a heads up just in case...
No, you can avoid this by not digging down into the sand. I move it across the surface, touching the sand a bit, and the sand grains do lift up into the Python but if you lift it a bit higher they all slowly drop back out. It's only when you get a real thrust into the substrate that the vacuum created makes it pull up more.

Quote:
As for temp I bought a thermometer sticker to monitor it. Where is the ideal place to put it to have good readings? Had thought of the middle towards the back on side of the tank.
If this is one of those stick-on plastic thermomenters, they can be inaccurate. I prefer the old fashioned glass theromemeter that floats, and can be attached with a small suction cup that comes with it. MArineland make these, probably others too. They are not expensive.

I have mine at the opposite end of the heater(s). In the flow from the filter is good if you can so you get a good current around it.

Quote:
I've been reading about their habits and possibilities of them jumping out. Plan on having the hood on while I'm away and during the night. Is there a real need to have the hood open, such as for airing?
No, I never deliberately leave the cover glass open or the hood open. Only to feed. I remove it completely during water changes of course.

Quote:
Was at petsmart yesterday, restocking food for my dogs and getting the API Fresh water master test kit... saw that they had silver hatchetfish and silver dollars available. Silver dollars were on my initial list, but was advised that they're heavy plant eaters and I should go with plastic plants if they were going to be in the tank. Is this the case or would be ok to have a few silver dollars in there too with the live plants I plan on? Might have to go with silver hatchet if I can't get a hold of marbled...
Silver Dollars will eat plants, esp soft ones, they are primarily vegetarian. And they need lots of space, check the profile.

Silver Hatchets are probably the slightly larger species, I have some, but prefer the Carnegiella species.
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:01 PM   #16
 
No luck with quickrete play sand, local home depot doesn't carry it :/

Don't think other hardware stores around would carry it since there would be very low demand and ordering online might be a bit pricey due to S&H charges. Sand play pins aren't a big thing here.

Is there a good replacement?
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:40 PM   #17
 
Is this light the one you're reffering to?

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Old 07-16-2013, 01:23 PM   #18
 
*bump* want to get this thing going, but all I can find locally so far is the gravel that either Wal-mart, Petsmart or pet stores sell.

Any recommendations on suitable substrate and how to calculate how much is required?
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:40 PM   #19
 
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As for sand substrate, any sand will do, look for pure quartz sand, quartz is inert and will not alter water chemistry, Sakcrete is another brand. Pool filter sand is another alternative, as long as it meets the above criteria. Avoid any calcium carbonate based sand or anything with additives like some 'paver' sands, which sometimes have added substances to make it bind together, and obviously avoid any that may say 'not for use in aquariums'; some do.

If you can't find any suitable sand from hardware type stores, you can always use that marketed just for aquariums, I like Caribsea Super Naturals line.

That is the bulb that Byron often recommends, if it is the 6700K one, which it looks like it is.
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Old 07-17-2013, 11:55 AM   #20
 
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Originally Posted by Quantum View Post
As for sand substrate, any sand will do, look for pure quartz sand, quartz is inert and will not alter water chemistry, Sakcrete is another brand. Pool filter sand is another alternative, as long as it meets the above criteria. Avoid any calcium carbonate based sand or anything with additives like some 'paver' sands, which sometimes have added substances to make it bind together, and obviously avoid any that may say 'not for use in aquariums'; some do.

If you can't find any suitable sand from hardware type stores, you can always use that marketed just for aquariums, I like Caribsea Super Naturals line.
Thanks! Might be able to get pool filter sand at the pool shops around... but these substrates would need fertilizer in either tabs or liquid, right?

Amazon carries Caribsea Eco Complete, but it's the black version. They don't have the red one available ATM. I think I'm going with the caribsea eco complete, going to see if I can get the red version...

It is ok to mix in two substrate, like the Eco Complete black on the bottom for the plants and rooting and Caribsea Natural Rio Grande on top?



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Originally Posted by Quantum View Post
That is the bulb that Byron often recommends, if it is the 6700K one, which it looks like it is.
thanks, wanted to be sure. Its the 6700K one.
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