aquarium terminology
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aquarium terminology

This is a discussion on aquarium terminology within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ok ive heard a couple things i dont really know what they, are so i was just kind of wondering what they were. when ...

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Old 12-23-2007, 10:12 PM   #1
 
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aquarium terminology

ok ive heard a couple things i dont really know what they, are so i was just kind of wondering what they were. when someone says RO water what does that mean? what does it mean when someone says inline heater? whats a UV sterilizer? where can i tell kelvins on a light? whats the term "outgas" mean when were talking about C02? and finally what is a drip system on an aquarium? i guess that was more then a couple but any help would be awesome, thanks.
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Old 12-24-2007, 01:17 AM   #2
 
Let's take this one item at a time.

1.) RO water is Reverse Osmosis water. This water has been run through a series of filters to remove all chemicals, salts and contaminates. When using this water for your tanks you need to add salts, chemicals, and conditioners to get the water to the correct make up for your fish to survive and prosper.

2.)An inline heater is a heater that is installed inline with the tubes to, usually, a canister filter. They can also be used with a sump system. They are usually installed on the return side of the filter.

3.) A UV sterilizer, quite simply put, is a piece of equipment that utilizes ultra-violet light to sterilize the water. It, again, is usually placed on the return side of a filter system. It works by forcing water to run around an ultra-violet light bulb, which is usually around 5-7 watts. The ultra-violet light destroy any living organism which could adversely affect the health of your fish.

4.) Kelvins is a thermo-dynamic term that uses absolute zero as a starting point. Absolute zero is a theoretical term where a temperature is reached that a body neither radiates nor absorbs energy. A light bulb is sometimes rated in kelvins which denotes the operating temperature of a bulb. In theory, the higher the kelvins, the more closely the light emitted by the bulb resembles the natural light ofthe sun.

As for items 5 and 6, I am not real familiar with the use of either CO2 or with drip systems. CO2 is used in heavily planted tanks to promote healthy plant growth. I'm sure one of our plant gurus will reply here. Drip systems are most generally used in saltwater applications. Hopefully, one of our "salties" can answer that question better than I. Of course, you can always Google it.
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Old 12-24-2007, 08:38 AM   #3
 
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Drip systems consist of a single (or more) compartment which has a tray, or some piece of equipment on top, covering the compartment dotted with holes. This is meant to disperse the incoming water so it 'drips' onto the media below. This allows for _maximum_ contact time with the media below it, usually bio-balls and sponges. With all-in-one tanks, this is generally frowned upon since the bio-balls are detritus factories that are harmful to the saltwater system. I'm not sure how efficient drip systems are with other setups. I'd imagine a larger setup that has a drip system would have a stage or two or filtration before the water reaches the drip compartment to reduce any potential of detritus storage.

Convert your drip compartment into a fuge, I say. :D :D
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Old 12-24-2007, 11:32 AM   #4
 
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Aha ok RO is reverse osmosis. thanks for the help you guys. still wondering about that C02 dealy
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Old 12-24-2007, 12:27 PM   #5
 
Yeah, I have to admit was a clueless on a few of those things myself.

Also, could someone explain this tank to me:

http://stlouis.craigslist.org/for/518249989.html

It has a 30 gallon filter under the tank?? Would that be an overflow tank? And I was curious how overflow tanks work are they just for saltwater?? I dont really understand the filtration for these huge tanks like this. I just assumed you would get a couple of powerful canisters for a tank this size.
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Old 12-24-2007, 01:22 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brother
Yeah, I have to admit was a clueless on a few of those things myself.

Also, could someone explain this tank to me:

http://stlouis.craigslist.org/for/518249989.html

It has a 30 gallon filter under the tank?? Would that be an overflow tank? And I was curious how overflow tanks work are they just for saltwater?? I dont really understand the filtration for these huge tanks like this. I just assumed you would get a couple of powerful canisters for a tank this size.
yeah im kinda clueless on the whole overflow/sump thingy, can it only be hooked up to a canister filter? does the water go through the sump before or after the canister filter?
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